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She Did What for Water?

Stacey’s dream; to raise enough money to help The Water Project build a well to provide clean, safe water to a community in Africa.

She’s committed to seeing it happen.

Really committed… like… shave her head committed.

Stacey’s put all her hair on the line on the floor.  She promised to chop off her “blonde locks” in return for donations to her water well fundraising campaign, and even before she’s hit her goal, Stacey has kept that promise!!

Stacey says she’s “trading something that is very valuable to me, to give others a chance at life!”

In addition to inspiring her friends to give, all that beautiful blonde hair is now on its way to creating a wig for a cancer patient – doubling the good!

Now it’s your turn.

Help Stacey Fund a Well like This!

Stacey’s close friends worked really hard to raise over $1,800.  But there’s still a ways to go to reach the goal.

You can join in by donating to her fundraising page.  Together, you’ll fund a water well in Kenya, helping unlock potential in a developing community. You’ll help Stacey achieve her goal and you’ll change the lives of hundreds of people.

…and you don’t even need to harm a hair on your own head (unless you want to, which would be cool, so send a video).

 

Charting Impact Report

Charting ImpactThe Water Project just completed our Charting Impact Report as a demonstration of our commitment to ongoing transparency and accountability in support of our mission. The report contains answers to five questions that encouraged reflection and learning about strategies and results in our work.

Charting Impact is a collaboratively developed, extensively tested framework that focuses on making an organization more effective. At the heart of Charting Impact are five simple questions that require reflection and encourage communication about what really matters – results.

Responding to these questions encourages strategic thinking about how an organization will achieve its intended impact, and shares concise information about organization’s plans and progress with key stakeholders and the public.

Charting Impact is a nationwide initiative of BBB Wise Giving Alliance, GuideStar USA, and Independent Sector, three organizations that have been leaders in the nonprofit and philanthropic sector for decades. This common framework was developed with input from nearly 200 members of the nonprofit community, including 39 organizations that participated in a pilot test in 2010.

We hope you will check out our report and tell us what you think: Read our Charting Impact Report »

Well by Well – We Can Do That

We all know how much our military men and women give in service to our country, but LT Jared N. Smith, Command Chaplain in the Naval Air Facility El Centro, also encourages his congregation to give generously to important causes like The Water Project.


The Navy must donate the congregation’s weekly collection to non- profit organizations, and Jared makes sure that they give to local, national, and global causes.  After hearing about The Water Project from a donation his brother made and learning more about water scarcity, Jared decided to give some of the congregation’s funds to fight water scarcity.

Jared says that the water crisis is something that some Navy men and women have experienced firsthand. Before entering the military, he had such an experience. Jared spent three weeks in the Democratic Republic of Congo where he saw people walk miles for dirty water with no clean water available. “The most motivating factor for me to give is that I have seen the people who are impacted by this work, and I encourage those who have had these experiences to tell our stories of the people affected.”

LT Jared N. Smith, Command Chaplain in the Naval Air Facility El Centro

The money that Jared’s congregation donates is given to be used wherever it is needed.  He says it’s important to support the effort however necessary because addressing water scarcity is one of the most effective ways to fight poverty.

His humility and the generosity of his congregation just add to the admiration we hold for our service men and women who give so selflessly in so many ways. Jared believes that we can all work to end the water crisis.

Knowing how tirelessly our men and women of the military work can inspire us all to do our part in ending this crisis. As Jared says, it will happen if we continue our hard work. “There’s no reason we cannot provide clean water to everyone in the world who needs it. . . well by well, town by town, village by village, country by country, we can do that.”

A school in Uganda is receiving clean water in part from the donations from Jared’s congregation. Check it out here. And give a salute in honor of Jared and our friends at the Chapel in El Centro.

“Do a good job, and work hard.”

Children can inspire us in so many ways; they have energy, enthusiasm, and an optimism for life that seems unquenchable.  At just five years old, Tayler is setting himself as an example for all of us. Read how this boy raised $500 but knew that he wanted to do more, showing  all of us how big dreams can grow from small beginnings, and how far hard work can take us.

Tayler collected donations for his Water Project.

Tayler has always loved Africa. He is fascinated with the animals and wants to visit one day. While he was eating a watermelon one day, he told his mother he wanted to send the seeds to Africa so they could have watermelon for food. When his mother, Kerry, explained that Africa does not have a lot of water and watermelon might not be able to grow, Tayler  wasn’t satisfied. “They couldn’t grow watermelons without water, so I wanted to send them water,” he said. Together, he and his mother looked online to see how they might be able to do that, and they found The Water Project.

Tayler’s first $500 for his water project came from asking family and friends to contribute to his water jug when they came to the house. He then put jugs in public places – a local store, the gym his mother goes to, and the secondary school where she teaches.

Still wanting to do more, Tayler and his Mom approached the school, LaSalle Secondary School, to make a presentation. He did a slide show for approximately 200 students, and even  put a jug on his head to demonstrate how they carry water in Africa. The students were so motivated they did a Walk for Water, walking the streets with jugs on their heads to raise money for the project. Tayler’s influence multiplied as he and the students collected money for the well, going to houses and telling about the project. Together, they added another $3,400 to the project!

LaSalle Secondary School students join Tayler on his Walk for Water.

Determined to earn enough to complete a project, Tayler is still working to reach his goal and as of this writing has raised almost $4,000!  Check it out! Tayler says he was surprised at how much money he raised and to learn about how so many people do not have clean water in Africa.

His advice to other people who might want to help with their own water project?  ”Do a good job, and work hard.”

Do a good job, and work hard. Simple advice, but so very wise. Tayler’s project can remind us of the infinite possibilities created when we do just that.

Want to help Taylor reach his goal? Donate to his fundraising page. Together, it can happen.

TWP demonstrates commitment to Turkana as Public Health Campaign gets under way

 

Back in January I wrote a blog piece detailing the beginnings of our Public Health Campaign in Turkana, Northern Kenya. You can read that piece here. A couple of months later, and things are really starting to move. James Lobokan is coordinating the campaign from Lodwar Town, and his latest report really gives an insight into the potential impact of the initiative. TWP is committed to this part of Kenya for the long term, and the 18 month programme is broad based and varied in it’s content. Here’s a summary of what’s happening on the ground:

The three main areas that we are focusing on are Kakiring Village, Lolupe Village, and House of Hope Orphanage. James is responsible for running hygiene promotion programmes with the people at these three centres, as well as ensuring that the water management committees are functioning well and that maintenance issues are being dealt with properly and efficiently.

One of the main things he’s been helping community members do is register their committees as self help groups with the government and, thereafter, open bank accounts. Households are required to contribute a small monthly fee for maintenance of the facility, which ensures against future breakdown. This is often a weakness of water and sanitation systems, as communities fail to maintain their contributions over time. We’re hopeful that with official registration and the regular visits James is undertaking, contributions will be consistent.

At this early stage in the campaign, James is also working to establish the main areas of concern regarding community health. For both Lolupe and Kakiring heath facilities are as far as 20km away. James is a trained physician, and is able to treat minor ailments in the field, but moreover he is working hard to educate the people about personal health issues, and is focused on helping people access facilities where ever possible. We see collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health as vital in these efforts, and again James is working to ensure the community are aware of how best to access services.

Clearly a key aspect of health is nutrition. Therefore, alongside the hygiene and public health focus, James is also training local people on agricultural practices. At House of Hope there are already two greenhouses in operation, as our partner SERV International works hard on food security. Using the orphanage as a model, James is currently identifying individuals to be trained in greenhouse management at the village level. In the future we dream that these recently settled communities will be able to improve their access to nutritious food though growing their own tomatoes, kale and  other vegetables.

So it’s a great start. Hygiene, community management of water supply, public health education and agricultural training wrapped up in a complete package. We’re delighted at how well things have started, and look forward to sharing future aspects of this innovative programme.

Thanks for reading!

Overture: An Evening at Classen HS Wish Week

Last Monday, around 8pm I walked into a small coffee shop in Oklahoma City. Most nights “The Bean and Leaf” is a sleepy restaurant tucked between a liquor store and a closed down burger joint, but that night it was positively humming with activity.

The place was packed from wall to wall for Classen High School’s “Wish Week” Open Mic Night. “Wish Week” is five beautiful days where the students of Classen come together and put on a variety of amazing events and crazy fundraisers to raise money for clean water.

Throughout the night there were songs, poems, and some really impressive art work all created by the students at Classen. To be honest, not all of it was “American Idol” perfect. It didn’t have to be. There were plenty of wrong notes, miffed lyrics, and shaky hands delivering poems in public that were written in private. But the night was so much bigger than that, the things that brought us together more grand. Out of tune guitars were soon fixed and there was never an awkward silence that didn’t receive a reassuring laugh and cheer from the crowd.

Last Monday, for about 3 hours, we were a family. What mattered was a cause that brought us together. Every piece of art, every stanza, every song (good and bad) was our way of dreaming up a new world together. A world where every one has access to something as simple, beautiful, and powerful as clean water. Our open mic night had become the overture for a symphony about to play out across the world.

Students of Classen SAS Wish Week Fundraising Crew

By this Friday, the students of this small inner city high school are going to have raised their goal of $10,000. I won’t be surprised if they beat it. Their power comes from a community who are beginning to realize their creative potential to do good in the world around them.

My hope is that you would join us in doing the same.

To support the students of Classen SAS Wish Week donate here » 

You can start your own Wish Week or other campaign too…

Learn about Wishing Well


Ryan Groves
Wishing Well

From Brownie Points to Well Wishes — Rylie’s Story

Rylie’s Girl Scout troop worked together to learn about the water crisis and contribute to a well project.

Have you ever felt like you can’t possibly make a difference? Oftentimes we feel powerless to make any lasting impact in the world we live in, but 4th grader Rylie refused to believe that.  She educated others and brought people together with the common goal of raising money to build a well.  Rylie proves that together we can do great things and shows that the power of determination can be stronger than any perceived obstacle.

Rylie first became involved with the Water Project in 2011 while her Brownie troop was working on a badge.  The girls learned about the scarcity of clean water in much of the world, and they contributed funds from their cookies sales to the project.  Their contribution in and of itself is wonderful, but what is most impressive is the knowledge that Rylie carried forward from that experience.

Last year her 4th grade class studied the global impact of clean water, and the children were overwhelmed by the problem.  They wanted to do something to help, but they felt there was no way they could make an impact.  That is, until Rylie stepped forward and told her story.

Continue Reading »

A Look Ahead to 2013

The TWP Team

Our team, serving locally this Christmas at a food bank here in Concord.

We have big plans for 2013 and we need your help to make them happen.

Would you take a moment to read this important letter from our founder and consider how you’ll join us?

Read: Growing Deeper in 2013
A Letter from our Founder »

 


TWP embarks on Public Health Campaign in Northern Kenya

TWP has been slowly working towards establishing a presence in Northern Kenya for a couple of years. During this time we’ve brought clean water to both the House of Hope Orphanage as well as Kakiring Community.  Working in

Community members at Kakiring use the TWP funded water source.

Northern Kenya is a challenge, conditions are tough and success is not guaranteed. Mobilising equipment from Nairobi is time consuming and expensive, and the road north is slow and dangerous. But despite the challenges we’ve had great success. The children at House of Hope are able to focus on their learning, the people of Kakiring no longer need walk for hours everyday to collect water from the river.

So what’s new? Well, over the past few months we’ve been talking with our partner SERV International about maximising the benefit that clean water brings. We want to build upon the hygiene and sanitation training that comes as standard in our work, and develop a public health agenda that demonstrates a long term commitment to the welfare of the people with whom we work.

To that end, TWP is committed to developing, funding and  supporting an 18 month Public Heath campaign in Northern Kenya, with a focus on the children of House of Hope, the people of Kakiring, and those of a neighbouring community, Lolupe.  The campaign will focus on regular community level visits, reinforcing health and hygiene messages and empowering communities to engage with local government and the health care provision in and around Lodwar Town.

During the programme, staff will be focusing on the following issues:

  • Hand washing
  • Disease transmission routes and how to block them
  • Household sanitation
  • Human waste management
  • Menstrual health
  • Accessing local services
  • Managing a water point – Operation and Maintenance of project hardware
  • Nutritional understanding
  • Agricultural knowledge and skills

It’s a broad focus, but one we feel confident about. Once the programme is up and running we’ll be able to report of specific programme activities and experiences from the field. It’s an exciting programme, with a demonstrable long term focus on developing local knowledge and skills, and we feel it will impact greatly on the lives of those we are committed to.

It all kicks off in January 2013. Watch out for more updates as things get moving!

Can you Walk on Water?

We can’t help but smile when we see these amazing women from Delta Sigma Theta! Over 100 people participated at the Harford County Alumnae Chapter’s (DST-HCAC) annual Walk On Water 5K this past July, and the pictures tell the story. They know how to have fun while raising money for clean water!

Delta Sigma Theta is “A Sisterhood Called to Serve”. Four core principles of the sorority are Courage, Hope, Wisdom, and Strength. To-date, over ten Delta Sigma Theta chapters have donated to the clean water projects we do, raising over $15,000 when combined. For the Harford County Alumnae chapter, by hosting this community-based event, the 100 participants in Maryland are unlocking the potential of over 350 people in a community 4500 miles away in Sierra Leone.

But one event wouldn’t do for DST-HCAC. They already have their 2013 event scheduled for June 22nd, and are beginning the planning. Are you in the Maryland area? Mark your calendar and join the team as they walk, run, and laugh to the finish-line of this fabulous 5K. Can’t join them? Support their efforts by giving to their 2013 fundraising page, here. Together we are better; and serving together we are a force.