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The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Alhasan Kamara
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Animal House
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Clothes Line
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Clothes Line
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Inside Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Isata Kamara
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Motobike Transportation
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Small Boy Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Small Boy Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Solar Touch Light Set Under Sunlight For Recharging
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Breaking Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Woman From The Stream After Finished Laundering
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Young Man Carrying Cassava Leaves Stems To Farm House
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Young Men Making Garden Bed For Planting
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kennenday Village -  Water Source

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  08/31/2020

Project Features


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Community Profile

Just after completing the prayers at around 6:00 AM, all of the 226 people in Kennenday village are awake. Everybody will then start their daily routine—first, the rush to fetch water. The main water source is located in the swamp. From the last house to the swamp is about fifteen minutes walk each way.

The water is full of impurities. One can see little fishes, frogs, and it is open for contamination from nearby farming and people as they go to get water each day.

In particular, young people in this community go through a lot.

“We always wake up around 6:00 in the morning to rush down the swamp to fetch water. Before reaching the site, one will meet a queue waiting to fetch water,” said Alhassan, a 14-year-old student we met.

After making more than 4 trips to fetch water in the morning, young people like ALhassan then prepare for school. Many will miss breakfast because they are running late. This cycle and the fact that students miss school due to waterborne illnesses caused by drinking the water contributes to a high dropout rate in this community, say parents.

Alhassan told us that he is late to school most days and punished for it. It is because he has to make so many trips to get water. Because the swamp is open, the water gets dirty fast. That means that people must wait for the water to settle after they dip in a container. This causes the process to take even longer.

“We have suffered too much for us to secure a clean and pure water for our community but to no avail. I have personally lost my son, and the cause of his death was dysentery,” said Mohammed Kamara, a farmer who lives in the community.

“I know he died as a result of the present water we drink.”

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling this well at Kennenday Village. This project will relieve the people here of the their water challenges

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to open contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Kennenday Village will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep latrines clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors