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The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Young Man Processing Palm Oil
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Young Man Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Headman
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Main Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Mohamed Barrie
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Mohamed Barrie
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Osman Turay
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Osman Turay
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Shop
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Small Boy Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Small Boy Collecting Water At Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Woman Removing Good Palm Karmel Seeds From The Bad Ones
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Young Boy Making Local Bed For Resting
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Young Girl Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Kalahire Junction -  Young Girl Carrying Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  08/31/2021

Project Features


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Kalahire Junction is a quiet village found at the center of the Lokomasama Chiefdom. The community members are seasoned farmers producing varieties of fruits and vegetables. Having vast acres of land has made it possible for community members to embark on different types of farming. The people generally grow cucumbers, pepper, garden eggs, and rice. Most traders looking to buy produce and fish for sale to other parts of the country usually come to Kalehere to wait for the sellers patiently.

Speaking to the oldest person in the village, he shared with our team that water is the attracting quality to any village settlement in the old days. The people in the town used water from the swamp for so many years that it is the source they know best. Half the year, the people spend time fetching water from the stream. The other half of the year is spent fetching water from the only hand-dug well in the village.

Today, the primary water source for the 238 people here is a seasonal well dry at various points each year.

“I spend my spare time hauling water and green grass for the animals. When the well in the village is dry, I have to go all the way to the stream to fetch water regularly just for the animals and the one I use for myself,” said Mohamed B, a boy we met in the community.

There is never enough water for the entire population in the community, which will likely leave the people susceptible to drinking water from less desirable sources. The hand-dug well environment is imperfect and prone to contamination. The well is also seasonal, making it harder and more costly to maintain since it often.

“This particular well had served us for a few years before it started going dry,” said Osman Turay.

“I know that the water from the stream is no longer good for human consumption, but what can we do? We have to keep drinking. Day after day and year after year, we drink and pray that drinking this contaminated water will damage our health. This situation personally affects me in more ways than one. It puts my life at risk, for starters. Also, the role of a leader of a community is to make sure that the best is provided for people.”

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul is dry for a few months every year and needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year-round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column to ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, the casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a handwashing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

This training will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors