Giving Update: Kigbal Community

June, 2019

A year ago, you funded a well at Kigbal Community in Sierra Leone– creating a life-changing moment for M’balu Turay. Thank you!

Giving Update: Kigbal Community

People in Kigbal have been truly blessed since the well project was completed last year.

For M’balu Turay, this well means that he can spend more time at school and concentrating on school. And when he is not in school, he can play with his friends rather than spend large portions of his day collecting water.

“My life changed from the time this project was completed. I used to go to the stream to fetch water. It took a lot of time due to the distance from the village to the stream,” he said.

“As a result, I arrived at school late. Now, it is very easy to fetch clean, pure, and safe water for drinking and even go to school on time.”

M’balu Turay and Mohamed Kamara

The lives of these people have improved through the hygiene and environmental sanitation training conducted by our teams, too. Their lives have further improved because they are now using handwashing stations at critical moments such as after using the bathroom and before eating a meal.  This new knowledge coupled with clean water has driven away many diseases and sicknesses like diarrhea and dysentery that were previously contracted.

“We are extremely happy about this great help that you have brought in our community by providing a protected borehole with clean and safe water,” said Mohamed Kamara, the community caretaker of the well.

Our Field Officer with M’balu Turay and Mohamed Kamara

“This is the biggest change that has ever happened in our lives.  We have been in this village for many years without safe drinking water, but this borehole water brings us good health.”



See The Water Project in M’balu Turay's Community »

When you invest in The Water Project, you're investing in people like M’balu Turay. Your gifts help us reach more communities with the gift of clean, safe water. And every drop helps unlock potential.

Read More Stories From the Field »