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The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Excavation
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Excavation
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Only Clean Water Source In The Area
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Only Clean Water Source In The Area
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Only Clean Water Source In The Area
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  In The Kitchen
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Rose Wambua
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Rose Wambua
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Garbage Pit
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Kavinya Household
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Magret Kavinya
The Water Project: Kithumba Community A -  Community Members Ready With Their Tools

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Feb 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/05/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Africa Sand Dam Foundation. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Kakwa Self-Help Group was formed in the year 2016 by 10 members. Over the course of one year, total membership shot up to 26.

The group members come from Kithatu and Kithumba villages, which are in Makueni County, Kenya, and have several hundred of residents. The group has also established a leadership committee made up of seven members; three women and four men.

The average age is 46 years, while their mean household membership is five people. 58% of the respondents interviewed said that their average income is below 3,000 shillings a month; 27% reported that they earn an average of between 3,100 and 5,000 shillings, and 15% respondents said that they earn income between 5,100 and 10,000 a month, regardless of the income source. None of the respondents earn above 10,000 shillings.

Water Situation

The main sources of drinking water for the respondents are; open springs, a hand-dug well, and water piped to a kiosk. Only 4% of the respondents get their drinking water from the kiosk – each container of water must be paid for there. The other 96% get their drinking water from either surface water or the well. The distance covered to the water source depends on the nearness of the respondent to the water source. The longest distance covered is four to five kilometers, with the shortest distance being less than a kilometer.

Because of the long distances traveled to the well, donkeys are especially helpful to bring along. A typical donkey can shoulder four 20-liter jerrycans full of water. But if a household can’t afford a donkey, an adult must hoist a 20-liter jerrycan upon their backs and haul it all the way home.

We talked to Margret Kavinya, who said “We fetch water from a community well dug in our village. It’s the sole source of clean water in our area and this therefore places a lot of pressure on this single point as it attracts people from Kithumba and the neighboring Kithatu village. I don’t practice any water treatment methods so I drink and use the water straight from the source.”

It’s obvious that many community members either aren’t able to make it to the hand-dug well because they live far away, or find the well overcrowded and the wait unbearable. At the time of our interviews, there were six waterborne diseases reported: two cases of amoeba and four cases of typhoid.

Sanitation Situation

100% of households have a pit latrine. Most of these lack doors and instead have a curtain. After touring the environment, it also seems that community members are using these latrines. Open defecation is not an issue here.

However, there are no hand-washing stations to prevent he spread of bacteria via hands. A little over half of households have a dish rack and clotheslines, and some have even dug a pit to throw their garbage. There is a general appreciation for sanitation and hygiene, but the community has also acknowledged room for improvement.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

To address gaps in hygiene and sanitation practices in Kithangaini Kithuluni Community, training will be offered to self-help group members on three consecutive days. The members will learn about useful practices and tools to improve health, and then will be able to share those with their families and neighbors. Water transport, storage, and treatment methods will be taught, and hand-washing will be a focus. Group members will learn how to make their own hand-washing stations with everyday materials. To motivate participants, we must show the links between these activities and their people’s health.

Plans: Hand-Dug Well

This particular hand-dug well is being built adjacent to this group’s ongoing sand dam project (click here to see), which will supply clean drinking water once it rains. We have supplied the group with the tools needed for excavation. With the guidance of our artisans and mechanics, the excavated well will be cased, sealed with a well pad, and then finished with a new AfriDev pump.

Excavation takes a month or more on average, depending on the nature of the rock beneath. Construction of the well lining and installation of the pump takes 12 days maximum. The well will be lined with a concrete wall including perforations so that once it rains, water will filter in from the sand dam.

This well will be located in Kithumba Village, and will bring clean water closer to families having to walk long distances for their water.

Project Updates


02/19/2018: Kithumba Community Hand-Dug Well Complete

Kithumba Community, Kenya now has a new source of water thanks to your donation. A new hand-dug well has been constructed adjacent to a sand dam on a local river. The dam will build up sand to raise the water table and naturally filter water. Community members have also attended hygiene and sanitation training, and plan to share what they learned with their families and neighbors. You made it happen, now help keep the water flowing! Join our team of monthly donors and help us maintain this hand-dug well and hundreds of other projects.

Project Result: New Knowledge

The field officers worked closely with the self-help group chairman to arrange for hygiene and sanitation training. They wanted the best dates to ensure the attendance of all group members. Even community members who weren’t a part of the self-help group were invited to attend. We all met at Justine Daudi’s homestead, where group members constructed an awning for shade.

In the first session, we had the participants share their expectations. What was it that they wanted to learn about most? Participants shared that they wanted to learn how to prevent waterborne disease, more about personal hygiene, and how to work better with their group.

Two ladies take part in a role play that teaches the importance of working together

We also taught about hand-washing; when to wash, how to wash, and how to build a hand-washing station.

We compared and contrasted different daily habits and how they impact health. Many people were participating in the spread of germs and didn’t even know it. The participants were active in their learning, and were dedicated to putting together an action plan to implement everything they learned.

To cap it all off, we taught group members how to make soap. This will not only help each household to stay clean, but will give them an opportunity to earn money by selling the soap.

Mr. Nzunga said, “The training was very good. I have learned a lot of new things. I learned about latrine hygiene and I will build a better pit latrine at home. My family doesn’t know how to wash hands. Once I get home I will teach them on the method I learned here. I wish my wife attended the training too, but I will try to train her on the details of this training. I also learned about diseases and how I can prevent them.”

Project Result: Hand-Dug Well

We delivered the experts and materials, but the community helped get an extraordinary amount of work done. They collected local materials to supplement the project, including sand and water.

A hole seven feet in diameter is excavated up to a recommended depth of 25 feet. (Most hand-dug wells don’t reach that depth due to the existence of hard rocks between 10-18 ft.).

The diameter then shrinks to five feet when construction of the hand-dug well lining is completed. This lining is made of brick and mortar with perforations to allow for water to seep through. As sand builds up around the well walls, it will naturally filter the rainwater that’s stored behind the dam.

Once the construction of the lining reaches ground level, a precast concrete slab is laid on top and joined to the wall using mortar. Four bolts for the hand-pump are fixed on the slab during casting. The mechanics arrive to install the pump as community members watch, learning how to manage and maintain the pump for themselves. The well is then given a few days after installing the pump, allowing the joints to completely dry. After it rains, communities are advised to pump out the first water that seeps into the well because it often has a foul smell and a bad taste. After pumping that for a while, the water becomes clean and clear.

Mr. Nzunga said, “We had a big water problem in our area. I used to have to walk for two kilometers in search of water, but after we constructed the sand dam and well I just have to walk for 200 meters to fetch water. We are happy and grateful for the new source. We have plans to plant fruits and vegetables using the water in the dam.” This hand-dug well was built simultaneously with its adjacent sand dam (to see the sand dam, click here). The sand dam will collect sand that stores and filters huge amounts of water, water that will then be accessed safely through the pump.


The Water Project : 9-kenya4867-clean-water


11/14/2017: Kithumba Community Hand-Dug Well Underway

Kithumba Community in Kenya will have a clean source of water, thanks to your generous donation. A new well is being constructed adjacent to a new sand dam, and the community will attend a review on important sanitation and hygiene practices. Together, these resources will go a long way in stopping disease, hunger, and thirst in the area! We just posted a report including community details, maps, and pictures. We will keep you posted as the work continues!


The Water Project : 1-kenya4862-community-members-ready-with-their-tools


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - The Lifeplus Foundation