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The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Water From The Well
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Complete Well And Path
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Complete Well
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Celebrating The Well
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Celebrating The Well
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Bags Of Cement
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Construction
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Dam And Well Progress
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Hauling Rocks
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Lifting Boards
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Mixing Cement
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Building The Well Walls
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Carrying Rocks For The Well
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Cement Work On Dam Walls
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Close Up Of Well Construction
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Complete Well Foundation
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Dam Boards
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Dam Walls Cure
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Dam Wing Wall Progress
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Preparing For Dam Construction
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Trenching
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Trenching
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Well Foundation Nearly Complete
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Carrying Container Filled With Water
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Collecting Water At The River
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Filling Up Container With Water From The Scoop Hole
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Bramwel Mwenzwa Muu
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Filling Up Container With Water
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Rebecca Kamanthe Nzuki
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Scooping Water
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Chicken Coop
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Filling Up Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Homestead
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Latrine
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Latrine
The Water Project: Nduumoni Community A -  Water Storage Containers And Their Guard Dog

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jun 2020

Functionality Status:  Project Monitoring Data Delayed

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Nduumoni is a rural, fairly vegetated and peaceful community in Kenya. It is sparsely populated with most houses made of bricks that are home to some 335 people.

An average day for the community members starts at the crack of dawn with women walking while carrying containers of water on their backs. All roads here lead to the Nduumoni River where the women go to fetch water for the day. The water level is usually higher in the morning compared to later in the day, hence their early arrival.

The community members suffer a lot during the dry seasons because the Nduumoni River dries up very fast and people have to dig deep scoop holes to access water. The scoop holes are usually overcrowded because the water table is so low that typically only 1 scoop hole has water at any given time.

“I am an old woman now and water scarcity affects me a lot,” shared 76-year-old Rebecca Kama.

“During the dry seasons, I have to dig very deep scoop holes in order to fetch water. Often times, the water source is crowded.”

Depending on the queues, the women might decide to stay and wait for their turn, or they might try leaving and coming back. If they do not return home with water early enough, however, their children go to school hungry. If they get home in time, then they can prepare their children for school and feed them breakfast.

By 7:00 am the men are up and ready to go to their farms or their other work. By around 10:00 am, the water that was fetched in the morning has ended and the women are expected to make a trip back to the river. A lot of time is expended on this duty. Once they fetch water, they perform other household duties. By evening, when everyone returns home, the women prepare supper for the family and sleep.

The next morning, the cycle continues.

“Insufficient supply of water has contributed highly to the poverty levels in the region because we are unable to farm well. We spend a lot of our finances on [medical] treatment and fetching water at times,” said Bramwell Mwenzwa Muu.

“Life is hard without water.”

The most common livelihood in this region is farming. Most members rely on subsistence agriculture to earn income, but these practices are highly affected by unreliable rainfall patterns and climate change. Other common jobs here include the operation of small businesses such as driving a motorcycle taxi or running a small shop. Casual labor jobs such as house construction and farm work are also typical among young adults.

Reliable Water for Nduumoni

Our main entry point into Nduumoni Community has been the Wathanaa Self-Help Group, which is comprised of households that are working together to address water and food scarcity in their region. These members will be our hands and feet in both constructing water projects and spreading the message of good hygiene and sanitation to everyone.

Hand-Dug Well

This particular hand-dug well will be built adjacent to a sand dam project, which will supply clean drinking water once it rains. We have supplied the group with the tools needed for excavation. With the guidance of our artisans and mechanics, the excavated well will be cased, sealed with a well pad, and then finished with a new AfriDev pump.

Excavation takes a month or more on average, depending on the nature of the rock beneath. Construction of the well lining and installation of the pump takes 12 days maximum. The well will be lined with a concrete wall including perforations so that once it rains, water will filter in from the sand dam.

This well will be located in Nduumoni Village and will bring clean water closer to families.

New Knowledge

These community members currently do their best to practice good hygiene and sanitation, but their severe lack of water has been a big hindrance to reaching their fullest potential.

We will hold hygiene and sanitation training sessions with the Wathanaa Self-Help Group and other community members to teach about important hygiene practices and daily habits to establish at the personal, household, and community levels. This training will help to ensure that participants have the knowledge they need to make the most out of their new water point as soon as the water is flowing.

One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it is consumed. We will also emphasize the importance of handwashing.

We and the community strongly believe that all of these components will work together to improve living standards here, which will help to unlock the potential for these community members to live better, healthier lives.

We typically work with self-help groups for 3 to 5 years on multiple water projects. We will conduct follow-up visits and refresher trainings during this period and remain in contact with the group after all of the projects are completed to support their efforts to improve sanitation and hygiene.

Project Updates


06/26/2020: Nduumoni Community hand-dug well complete!

Please note, all photos in this report were taken before social distancing recommendations went into effect.

Nduumoni Community, Kenya now has a new source of water thanks to your donation. A hand-dug well was constructed adjacent to a sand dam (go here to check it out). The dam was constructed on the riverbed, which will build up sand to raise the water table and naturally filter water. Recent rains have helped the dam begin to build up sand and store water.

It could take up to 3 years of rain (because sometimes it only rains once a year!) for this sand dam to reach maximum capacity. As the sand dam matures and stores more sand, a supply of water will be available for drinking from the well. With this water, the surrounding landscape will become lush and fertile.

Hand-Dug Well

Construction for this well was a success!

We worked with the Wathanaa Self-Help Group for this project. The members and their families contributed materials and physical labor to complete the project.

Once it is safe to hold gatherings with the members, we will schedule a training session with community members. This 3-day intensive will cover a wide range of topics including personal and environmental hygiene and the operation and maintenance of the rain tank, latrines, and handwashing stations. There will be a special emphasis on handwashing.

(To see more of our work on the frontlines of COVID-19 prevention in all of the communities we serve, click here).

We will be sure to reach back out to you with more news and photos from the training!

Hand-Dug Well Construction Process

We delivered the experts, materials, and tools, but the community helped get an extraordinary amount of work done too. They collected local materials to supplement the project, including sand, stones, and water.

A hole 7 feet in diameter is excavated up to a recommended depth of 25 feet. (Most hand-dug wells do not reach that depth due to the existence of hard rocks between 10-18 ft.).

The diameter shrinks to 5 feet when construction of the hand-dug well lining is completed. This lining is made of brick and mortar with perforations to allow for water to seep through. Sand builds up around the well walls, which will naturally filter the rainwater that is stored behind the dam.

Once the construction of the lining reaches ground level, a precast concrete slab is laid on top and joined to the wall using mortar. 4 bolts for the hand-pump are fixed on the slab during casting. The concrete needs to dry for 2 weeks before the pump is installed.

The mechanics arrive to install the pump as community members watch, learning how to manage simple maintenance tasks for themselves.

The well is then given another few days after installing the pump to allow the joints to completely dry. The pump was installed level with the top of the sand dam. As the dam matures, sand will build-up to the top of the wall. Until then, people will climb the concrete steps to get their water.


The Water Project : kenya20317-celebrating-the-well-2


05/27/2020: Nduumoni Community hand-dug well underway

A severe clean water shortage at Nduumoni Community drains community members’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : kenya20316-20317-scooping-water-2


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Lifeplus Foundation