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The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -
The Water Project: Masingo Slum / Pillar Project - Kakamega, Kenya -

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Program: Wells for Kenya

Impact: 400 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - May 2010

Functionality Status:  Needs Some Attention

Last Checkup: 06/11/2018

Project Features


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Community Profile

The Masingo Slum is located in Kakamega, Kenya.  Home to hundreds of the poorest people in this city, the need for clean, safe water and sanitation was immense here.

The former water source was a nearby “river” which carries sewage from the town of Kakamega.  There is also a nearby unprotected spring, pictured below.  The water from the spring flows down through piles of garbage and waste.  Poverty is rampant.  Water borne illness a given.

Our partner, Bridge Water Project, collaborated closely with members of this community to plan and support this well project.  They intend to continue that in the long term.

As you can read in the final update below, the people of Masingo, upon receiving their new well immediately began to develop other means to relieve their own situation.  Small gardens are popping up.  And the water committee has even begun to install public toilets to improve sanitation and hygiene.

Even amidst their own dire need, the people of Masingo realize the value of clean, safe water and have each committed portions of their income to maintain it in the long term.

Masingo is a great example of how community based and community led water projects can quickly begin to transform lives and even restore a small measure of hope.

We're just getting started, check back soon!

Project Updates

Masingo Well Project Completed

Jun.25.2010

A new well has been completed and handed over to the community living in the Masingo slum near Kakamega Kenya.

Our implementing partner reported the following from the handing over ceremony. (unedited)

“It was a happy and joyous moment to people of Masingo slum when the Bridge water staff went for a handing over. We were received with their traditional songs like ‘KANO AMAUA KANDATOLA KHUNJIRA’ meaning the flowers I got on my way.

On reaching the ceremonial place, happy faces of the aged mothers and fathers together with the young men and women and their children were waiting to hear the good news from us. We had no otherwise but to declare and let them take full maintenance and operation costs of the water system.

During the ceremony, everyone from the community wanted to say thank you for what they said was a miracle in their life. A grandmother aged 85 years and who has a swollen stomach for over 10 years said that her stomach was swollen because of drinking water from the sewage. But the interesting part of her story was that for the shortest period she has used the clean water, the swollen stomach is now reducing. The old mother said that was her golden chance to have clean water since she was born. Another lady said, “Since I begun using the clean water, the problems of itching, stomach ache and severe headache have stopped.

One man stood and said that, “We are now clean and we look like other human beings, GOD came inside you people and brought life to us.”

After the testimonies, we went towards the water system and we found that the community had begun growing vegetables as a result of the water system. Also a local bathroom had been built as a source of income for maintenance and operation of the water system. The community members pay 20 shillings per house hold per month.”

WATSAN Training begins at Masingo

Apr.15.2010

Hygiene and sanitation training was recently completed at the Masingo Slum Water Project.  This training is part of the process of mobilizing the community as they prepare for their new well project.

Our team instructs community members using established and proven techniques, sensitive to cultural and educational differences between various sites.

In addition to this training, our local partner established a WATSAN committee made up of men and women who will oversee and help maintain the water project in the long term.  This is phase one of our three phase water project process.  Next, the project will move into the construction phase, and finally on-going monitoring and evaluation.


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.



Sponsors


1 individual donors