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The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Abraham Were
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Abraham Were
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Abraham With Field Officer Jonathan Mutai
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Head Teacher Aggrey Maloha With Abraham
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Mr Maloha Takes A Drink From The Rain Tank
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Mr Maloha Abraham And Jonathan
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Finished Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Finished Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Finished Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  New Latrines
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  New Latrines
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Tank Foundation
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Digging Latrine Pits
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Group Picture
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Making A Leaky Tin
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Making A Leaky Tin
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  School Cook At The Kitchen
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Carrying Water Back To School
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Students Walking To The Spring
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Students
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  Headteacher And Senior Teachers
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  School Compound
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  School Compound
The Water Project: Jidereri Primary School -  School Sign

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 411 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Oct 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/31/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Jidereri Primary School was started by the community in 2006 as nursery school. The local government took over in 2008, adding grades one and three. After ten more years of development, the school has a total population of 395 students. There are 14 teachers and two support staff who help the day to day activities run smoothly.

Water

The school does not have a water source. Instead, pupils must leave to fetch water from a protected spring that is two kilometers away! This is the closest clean water source, but it’s hard to believe that the water is still clean after it makes the long dusty journey back in open containers.

Students are also having to sacrifice precious study time to find this water. During our initial visit to the school, we managed to travel to the current water source and found that the two kilometer’s walk to fetch water is tiresome – not to mention the grueling return trip with the heavy water that was gathered.

Sanitation

Most of the pit latrines students use are made of brick and iron. However, they’re getting very old and the pits are almost full. Students are using these despite the horrendous smell and poor conditions – they are rarely cleaned, since that would mean more water needs to be gathered. It’s the same with the hand-washing bucket they have; if students were to wash their hands throughout the day, they’d need to make extra trips for water. Headteacher Mulira Musonere said, “Due to the poor hygiene in the school, some students have been infected with jiggers. Currently, we have 15 students who are absent because they cannot walk to school and are embarrassed due to the jiggers stigma. The teachers sometimes get sick too, from drinking contaminated water which students carry from home.”

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Hand-Washing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as hand-washing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two hand-washing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!


This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (formatted and edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

Project Updates


09/27/2019: Giving Update: Jidereri Primary School

A year ago, your generous donation helped Jidereri Primary School in Kenya access clean water.

There’s an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water at Jidereri Primary School. Month after month, their giving supports ongoing sustainability programs that help this school maintain access to safe, reliable water. Read more…


The Water Project : 4-kenya18049-head-teacher-aggrey-maloha-with-abraham


11/08/2018: Jidereri Primary School Project Complete

A new rainwater catchment system was built! Jidereri Primary School in Kenya now has a new source of safe, clean water thanks to your support. Handwashing stations were installed so that students can clean up after using their new latrines, and students and staff have received training in sanitation and hygiene.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

Construction for this 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank was successful!

“We are so grateful to have facilities like this in our school. The water tank will reduce the time that our pupils used to waste going to fetch water from the spring – which is quite a distance from the school,” shared Teacher Maxwell Asirigwa.

“More so, water from this one source will be much safer to drink than the water we got from different water sources. We lack words to express our sincere thanks for these great facilities in our school.”

The Process:

Our staff and the school administration started by looking around the school to determine the best location for their new rainwater catchment tank. This needed to be the best site with good, clean roofing to catch the rainwater. Then, we cleared the site: excavating the soil within the required measurements to make level ground for the tank foundation. The foundation was cast by laying stones on a level ground and then reinforcing it using steel, concrete and waterproof cement.

Both the drawing pipe as well as the washout pipe were affixed as the foundation was lain. The wall was built with ferro-cement techniques through six layers. The inner wall was plastered while rough casting was done on the outer part.

The catchment area was dug, plastered, and a staircase installed so students can easily get water from the tap.

Dome construction could begin after the superstructure had been given enough time to settle. The manhole cover was fitted, inlet pipes were connected to the roof gutters, inlet screens, ventilation pipes (breathers) and overflow pipes were all done to standard.

Once finished, the tank was given three weeks to undergo complete curing before it was cleaned and handed over to Jidereri Primary School, though we will continue to offer them unmatchable support as a part of our monitoring and maintenance program.

VIP Latrines

This project funded the installation of six new ventilated improved pit latrines. All of these new latrines have cement floors that are easy to use and clean. And with a rainwater catchment tank, there should be enough water to keep them clean all the time.

Handwashing Stations

Pupils can now enjoy washing their hands with soap thanks to the two handwashing stations that were delivered to their school.  These new handwashing opportunities will help reduce cases of hygiene-related illness. The training on hygiene has motivated these students to share what they’ve learned with their peers at school and families at home.

New Knowledge

We planned a hygiene and sanitation training by working closely with Headteacher Musonere. We asked that he recruit at least 16 student participants who will serve as ambassadors for good health among their peers. We were surprised to find 23 participants waiting in a classroom and eager to learn. The classroom was being used as a storeroom at the time, but we were able to find enough space.

The school needed to be equipped with knowledge on how to improve standards of hygiene and to also ensure that the sanitation facilities given to them are maintained to serve the school for years to come. Some of the topics covered include water pollution, personal and environmental hygiene, operations and maintenance of the facilities, group dynamics, and leadership and governance. The group activities equipped the new health club to promote hygiene and sanitation awareness at their school.

Handwashing practicals

Students especially enjoyed learning about dental hygiene. They were not aware of how little toothpaste they needed to brush; they figured that the more you use, the cleaner your mouth will be. of the size of toothpaste to be applied when brushing their teeth. We assured them that a pea-sized amount would be plenty.

The participants were so happy about the training. We could tell they were learning something new just by observing their facial expressions.

“We are so humbled and honored to have people like you today in our school. It is always said that learning is a continuous process. I concur because I have learned a lot today that I didn’t know,” shared Teacher Gladys Aganyanya.

“And I am sure also that our pupils have learned something new. Sanitation and hygiene standards in the school will not remain the same!” Most importantly, there’s now enough water to practice what was taught.


The Water Project : 26-kenya18049-finished-rainwater-tank


08/07/2018: Jidereri Primary School Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Jidereri Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 8-kenya18049-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Giving Update: Jidereri Primary School

September, 2019

A year ago, your generous donation helped Jidereri Primary School in Kenya access clean water – creating a life-changing moment for Abraham Were. Thank you!

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Jidereri Primary School.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Jidereri Primary School maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

Ever since the installation of their rain tank and other WaSH facilities last year, Jidereri Primary School has experienced many changes. The most noticeable of course is how they now have a reliable water source. Initially, pupils had to go quite a distance to an off-campus spring to fetch water, or they had to carry it from home from often unsafe sources. This was tiresome and time-consuming, which sacrificed pupils’ time and energy that they could have utilized on their studies. This is now in the past as they can now walk out of their classrooms and access clean drinking water right from their rain tank. Also, cleaning in the school is now done on a daily basis because of the availability of water.

The staff and students at Jidereri Primary School are all very appreciative of their WaSH facilities. The way Head Teacher Mr. Aggrey Maloha together with the sanitation teacher manage the facilities well indeed shows that they had suffered for a long time. In fact, before our own rain tank design included a drawing point cover for the tank’s tap area, Jidereri Primary School had fabricated their own cover to restrict water wastage and unwanted outside access. This demonstrated their clear desire to provide and maintain the best facilities possible for their students. Further, the hygiene and sanitation in the school have each greatly improved as refuse can no longer be seen around the school compound as it was before.

Abraham Were smiles at the rain tank’s tap

“A lot of changes have been witnessed since [the] implementation of [the] WaSH facilities in our school,” said Head Teacher Mr. Aggrey Maloha.

“To mention a few, we were rarely cleaning our classrooms but now we do it on [a] daily basis because of [the] availability of water. Besides that, our kids no longer have to go quite a distance [to the] spring from here in search of water. Ques in accessing sanitation facilities witnessed earlier have reduced after receiving 6 more doors of VIP latrines from the organization, then all 6 doors were given to girls because their sanitation facilities were limited in number. Also, our kids now do practice handwashing after visiting the toilet, something which was only practiced by teachers [before].”

Mr. Aggrey Moloha and Abraham at the rain tank

One of those pupils is 14-year-old Abraham Were, who was happy to share with us how these projects have impacted his experience as a learner at Jidereri Primary School.

“Since [the] implementation of these facilities, we have gotten enough time for our studies and safe water for drinking. We are no longer having to carry water from home to school or go to the spring to fetch water. More so, we do mop our classrooms on [a] daily basis, something which was rarely done before. This has enabled us [to] study in a more conducive environment. [In] my case, I only have to carry books unlike before when I used to carry water in one hand and books in the other.”

Mr. Maloha, Abraham, and Field Officer Wilson Kipchoge at the rain tank


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Jidereri Primary School maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Jidereri Primary School – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

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Contributors

Project Sponsor - Pineapple Fund