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The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Students Relax During Break At The Schools Grounds
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Students Outside Classrooms
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Students In The Schools Compound
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Students Heading To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Students Fetching Water At The River
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Section Of Mud Built Classrooms
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Schools Compound
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  School Staff
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Plastic Water Tank At The School
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Latrines And Trash Pit
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Inside The Latrine Floor
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Improvised Dishrack Behind Schools Kitchen
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Female Student Standing With Jerrycan Filled With Water
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Campus Building
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  Boys Urinal State
The Water Project: Irukose Primary School -  A River Flowing Nearby The School

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  02/28/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

A group of field officers were randomly visiting schools within Vihiga County and had to brave the rugged terrain towards Irukose Primary School. They were shocked to learn that 710 students attending the school get their water from river Yala – a very risky activity. They also assessed the toilets and found out that there were not enough for the large population of the school.

On a typical day, the students report to school at 8am for morning preparations. They then go for a 20-minute break and thereafter, the teachers start the morning lessons. The students sweep their classes every evening before heading home. A thorough cleaning of the classrooms is done at the end of every Friday.

Water

The students fetch water from river Yala, which was flooded at the time of our visit due to the heavy rains. The students use buckets which they dip into the river.

There is also a very large hippopotamus at River Yala which scares the students, so many opt to carry water from home.

In one case, a student fetching water from the river fell in and almost died from drowning. Luckily, the student was rescued by villagers who were near the river.

The water problem in the school is so severe and the community members sell water from a local unprotected spring to the school. They do this so that they can discourage the students from passing through their homes as they go to the spring.

The students suffer from typhoid and diarrhea because of the contaminated water sources.

Sanitation

Some latrines for the boys are now full and the girls had to spare two of their toilets so that they can be used by the boys.

The teachers have an improvised hand washing station with a 20-liter jerrycan. They drilled a hole at the bottom and they close it using a stick. The school had handwashing stations, but they are worn out and leaking.

“The students suffer from typhoid and diarrhea because of the contaminated water sources,” headteacher Mr. Paul Amalemba Imbwanga said.

“They also do not get the privilege of washing their hands after visiting the toilets because they are afraid of going to the river to fill the improvised hand washing stations.”

The sanitation teacher is very active and concerned about the health of the students. The school has a program of giving girls a packet of sanitary towels every month. When they are about to close, the girls are usually given enough packs to last them through the holidays. The teacher encourages the students to wear closed shoes and socks during the cold seasons so that they can keep warm.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as handwashing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!


This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.



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