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The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Three Rock Open Cooking
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Students Enjoy Class Outside
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Students Carry Desks
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Senior Teacher In The Staffroom
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Schools Kitchen
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Schools Farm
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Schools Dumpsite
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Schools Compound
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  School Latrines
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Improvised Dishrack
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Bricks Being Made At The Schools Compound
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Agriculture Students Projects
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  A Plastic Water Tank At The School
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  A Lesson Taking Place Under A Shade
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Garbage Pile
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Fetching Water From The Well
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Latrine Broken Doors
The Water Project: St. Mary's Namasanda Secondary School -  Section Of Latrine

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  02/28/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

A normal day St. Mary’s Namasanda Secondary School starts very early in the morning. Students report to school at 6am for preps till 7:20am where they collect litter around the school compound under the guide from the teacher on duty.

Thereafter they go to class for normal school lessons. Lesson starts at 8am in the morning and each lesson takes 45 minutes. The morning has a short break for 10 minutes and a long break for a half hour. After the long break, students attend two lessons before going for lunch.

After lunchtime they proceed to class for four lessons before going for games time. They break for home at 5:30pm.

School

St. Mary’s Namasanda Secondary School is situated in Bulimbo Village within Kakamega County. The school began in the year 2014 as one class, that is a form one (freshman) class at Namasanda Primary. During that time they used the primary school facilities until the county government purchased 4 acres piece of land.

Namasanda secondary is a humble school in terms of infrastructure. Most of the classrooms are made of iron sheets walls and roofed with iron sheets.

Stepping into St. Mary’s Namasanda, you are welcomed with brick-making work within the school compound. They started brickwork in the school by sourcing funds from the school account, according to the deputy headteacher.

The school is required to transition on its own next year. Headteacher Mrs. Rosemary Favour worries next year the school will face an acute shortage of water and other facilities if interventions are not taken.

Sanitation

Though the infrastructure in the school is still poor, the school compound looks good, free from liters around and the few available pit latrines are clean. They also have one form of sanitation facility – a dish rack at the school kitchen.

Students collect garbage and dispose it in a compost pit. After some time, they dig up and reuse the waste as organic manure in a vegetable garden within the school.

The pit latrines are made of concrete plastered floors, bricked walls, iron sheet roofs with wooden doors. Some of the pits are not in use due to the bad state of the structure and are almost full.

“Am very thankful for visiting us today and see for yourselves the challenges we have been going through. Today, at least am relieved after seeing you people. I see you as a solution to water and sanitation challenges in St. Mary’s Namasanda Secondary school,” Mrs. Favour said.

Water

Students gather water from the plastic rainwater harvesting tank by placing their containers under the discharged pipe to fetch water till full. It is treated with chlorine to make it safer for drinking. Students said they used plastic tank water almost immediately for drinking, cleaning their utensils and in cooking.

The roof catchment is free from rusting and trees are not around making it safe and clean. The only challenge is that water from the plastic tank is insufficient to the school population.

Most of the plastic containers used for fetching and drinking water do not have lids. The students clean the containers by pouring a little water inside and then shaking them to loosen the dirt that settles at the bottom.

A hand-dug well exists on the property, but the water is of poor quality – especially during the dry season when the water is either entirely gone or muddy.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

There will be two days for teachers and students to meet at the school to learn about hygiene and sanitation practices. They will also attend sessions on the management and maintenance of their new rainwater catchment tank, latrines, and handwashing stations. We will use all of our training topics to empower participants to invest their time in positive behaviors that promote health, prolong life, and enable them to become more self-reliant citizens.

The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

The two handwashing stations are 60-liter plastic barrels on metal stands, and each has a tap to conserve water. These are often delivered by hygiene and sanitation training so they can be used for demonstrations but always arrive by a project’s completion.

The CTC club will be in charge of filling these stations with water and will ensure that there is always a cleaning agent like soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will be set aside for each gender. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff. Students will no longer suffer from drinking dirty water.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance for these young scholars!


This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (formatted and edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.



Contributors