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The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Clearing Land For The Tank
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Materials We Delivered To The School
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Student Health Club Members
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Soap Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Soap Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Soap Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Martin Kioko
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Stove
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Staff Latrines
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Boys Latrines
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Open Water Collection
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Existing Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Girl Walks With Collected Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Girl Carries Jerrycan Of Water
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Students Pose Outside
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  School Buildings
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Kithoni Secondary School -  School Sign

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 96 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2019

Functionality Status:  Low/No Water or Mechanical Breakdown

Last Checkup: 07/11/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Kithoni Secondary School was started in 2013 by parents who felt their area needed a secondary school for their children who would travel long distances to access education. The school was eventually taken up by the Makueni District Education Board to operate as a government learning center. Kithoni Secondary has grown gradually over the past four years through the support of parents and teachers to attain its current status.

It has a plastic water tank to collect rainwater for the students, but it is not big enough. It only lasts for three weeks at a time before running dry – forcing the school to require the students to bring water from home each day. The water collected is not only inadequate but often unsafe. That puts students at risk of waterborne diseases and forces them to sometimes leave class to search for more water. Both situations prevent students from learning in school.

“Our school is young and in the process of establishing itself, lack of enough water supply affects the school community negatively, parents and students are required to bring water to school to sustain water needs. The extra burden placed on students affects their concentration in class and general school activities, the water available is never enough to sustain school water needs,” Mr. Methusela Katiku, Principal at the school, said.

The school has suffered the challenge of inadequate water supply since it was started, and acquiring water for use in school has always been an expensive affair for the students and their parents. Science lab activities have been largely affected by lack of sufficient water supply. It prevents them from undertaking the hands-on activities that could enrich their learning.

The latrines look good since they were recently constructed. However, low water supply in school has contributed to poor levels of cleanliness at the latrines and in the classrooms, making the learning environment unfavorable for good student life.

“The poor supply of water in school has exposed us to below average levels of hygiene and sanitation against our wishes, working on water projects will help us improve our hygiene and sanitation conditions because water access will be greatly boosted,” Mr. Katiku said.

The school’s tree planting program was halted because there wasn’t enough water.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Students and staff will be trained in hygiene and sanitation. Those in attendance will form a school health club that will promote good hygiene and sanitation practices both at school and at home. They will learn all the steps of proper handwashing, how to treat water, and how to keep their environment clean. The school will also be taught how to best oversee and maintain their new rainwater catchment tank and handwashing stations.

Handwashing Stations

Three handwashing stations will be delivered at the project’s completion. These are 1,000-liter plastic tanks fitted with four taps. The health club and school management will be responsible for making sure tanks are filled with water and that a cleaning agent such as soap or ash is available.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

We will build a 104,000-liter rainwater catchment tank for this school. Its clean water will benefit the students, teachers, and supplementary staff. Parents will mobilize the materials needed for construction, such as sand and stone and also lend some strong arms to help with the actual construction.

As soon as the tank has time to cure, it can begin to collect rainwater for drinking, cooking, and cleaning! 104,000 liters of water will keep students and staff in class to focus on learning.


This project is a part of our shared program with Africa Sand Dam Foundation. Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (formatted and edited for clarity) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

Project Updates


01/21/2019: Kithoni Secondary School Project Complete

We are excited to share pictures of the completed rainwater catchment tank and new handwashing stations being used at Kithoni Secondary School. The year is off to a strong start, and students feel much more optimistic about their ability to study now that they have clean water available at school.

Enjoy the new pictures uploaded to the project page. None of this would have been possible without you!

Handwashing Stations

The two large handwashing stations were delivered to the school in time for training. Each of these has three taps so that six students can wash their hands at the same time!

Rainwater Catchment Tank

Kithoni Secondary School is affiliated with the Kwa Voki Self-Help Group, since most of its members’ children attend here. These parents and school administration approached the self-help group committee and requested their help in alleviating the water shortage at the school.

The Process:

A meeting with all of the parents and the headteacher was then held to plan out the project. Parents agreed to collect construction materials like sand, rocks, and water. On the other hand, we delivered the expertise, tools, lumber, metal, cement, and gutter system. The parents also worked hard alongside our artisans.

Cement, wire, lumber, and the many tools delivered for this project!

This tank is a whopping 104,000 liters not because of a large student population, but because of how rarely it rains in Southeastern Kenya. The more water we can store during the seasonal rains, the more water available through the dry months.

Construction for this large rainwater catchment tank is much like the construction of a concrete house. First, the ground is leveled for foundation excavation. Alternating layers of impermeable rocks are laid upon mortar up to seven feet high, with internal and external diameters of 25 and 28 feet respectively.

A reinforced concrete column is built right up to the center of the tank, which holds up the roof and prevents it from caving in. The walls are then plastered both internally and externally with waterproof cement. After that, several feet of guttering is installed and channeled into the tank.

School leadership is armed with the technical skills to ensure that the water tank remains functional, and gaps that exist can be identified through our ongoing monitoring visits.

“We are very pleased to have completed the construction of this high impact water project,” said Principal Methusela Katiku.

“It will go a long way in helping us achieve water security and also saving money which was initially spent on water. Having access to adequate clean water is a goal for everyone in the world, and this project will help us always have clean water throughout the year for the school community.”


The Water Project : 16-kenya18240-flowing-water


12/04/2018: Successful Training at Kithoni Secondary School

We are excited to share news of a successful water project at Kithoni Secondary School. Students will return from holiday vacation with a big reason to celebrate!

The rainwater catchment tank was constructed, but the team could not return to take pictures because the school administration has locked things up for December vacation and asked us to return to take the pictures after the students return in January. Our painter also plans to decorate the tank with hygiene reminders such as “Choose Handwashing, Choose Health.”

We look forward to showing you this in January!

A hygiene and sanitation training was conducted with several students and teachers, and handwashing stations were delivered; we are excited to share an account of training with you today.

New Knowledge

Hygiene and sanitation training was planned by field officer Veronica Matolo in collaboration with the Kathonzweni area field officer, Muendo Ndambuki. He communicated with the school’s deputy headteacher and settled on a suitable date. All teachers and students were invited to attend.

There were 68 students in all. The entire school population wasn’t there because some had to attend a chemistry examination. A majority of students were very active and involved. Girls generally expressed more interest compared to their boy counterparts, possibly because women are traditionally seen as most responsible for hygiene and water-related activities.

Trainer Matolo taught about personal hygiene, the importance of latrines, how germs spread, and how to make soap. Students loved following Ms. Matolo’s recipe to make their first batch of soap together. The students were impressed and happy that the headteacher said that they will continue making soap to have enough for the next semester. They had been buying soap every semester, and will be grateful to decrease this line item on their budget.

Students also appreciated the handwashing demonstrations. Ms. Matolo showed them all of the steps to thorough handwashing out at the new handwashing taps we delivered to the school. The students had just discussed how germs spread, and learned that handwashing is the cheapest and most effective way to keep from getting sick. They watched closely and then got to practice handwashing for themselves.

Don’t forget to use the soap!

After all of this new knowledge, the students voted on members for a student health club. These students will work with one of their teachers to promote good hygiene practices and healthy lifestyles among their peers.

Student health club leaders

“The training has been good to us as students,” said 16-year-old Martin Kioko.

Martin Kioko

“The knowledge acquired will help us improve our personal hygiene practices, and the content on soap-making will be applied to making soap for use here in school. The soap will be used in handwashing and other activities such as washing our plates after lunch.”


The Water Project : 11-kenya18240-soap-training


11/27/2018: Good News from Kithoni Secondary School

A severe clean water shortage at Kithoni Secondary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, that will soon be a problem of the past. In fact, we just heard that construction on a new rainwater catchment tank is almost finished.

Students completed their national examinations this week and have already been dismissed for December vacation. We were able to hold hygiene and sanitation training before break, but the tank was still under construction.

We will reach out again soon with pictures of training and the completed tank, but ultimately look forward to sending you another update in January once students are in school and benefiting from clean water!


The Water Project : asdf_kithoni-sec-wt_wash-training-5


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Da Bomb Bath Fizzers
Project Sponsor - Da Bomb Bath Fizzers