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The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Staff Latrines
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Cooking Area
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Boys Latrines
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Students Waving Hi
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Students Playing
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Student Schedule
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Mbuva Matheka
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Water Tanks
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Solar Powered Borehole
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  Broken Water Tanks
The Water Project: Kyaani Primary School -  School Sign

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/04/2018

Project Features


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Kyaani Primary School lies in a peaceful and calm rural setting. The beauty of the green vegetative canopy captures one’s eye as soon as you step into the school. Most of the buildings are built of bricks and are well-roofed with strong iron sheets.

The school was started in 1977 by the community members in a bid to educate the children from Kyaani Village. The school is sponsored by Africa Inland Church but has grown over time, through the support of the parents and the government.

There is a community borehole that is pumped by a solar pump to the school’s tank in order to supply water throughout the school. However, this borehole is overly depended on by the members of the community. The water that is pumped into the school is totally reliable on the solar pump and the amount of solar that has been harnessed, which is not 100% dependable.

As a result, the students must turn to alternative sources of water. Many must carry containers of water from home to make up for the shortage. That water is of unknown origins and is often collected from open or unsafe sources.

Despite the challenge, the latrines at the school are well-kept and generally clean. However, there is no soap for students to wash their hands with afterward.

“Our state of hygiene is average, we are trying our level best to create a conducive environment for our students, one that will not disrupt their studies at any cost. If we had enough water storage facilities, we could go very far, we would really develop this place,” Headteacher David Matheka said.

What we can do:

Training

Students and staff will be trained for one day. Those in attendance will form a school health club that will promote good hygiene and sanitation practices both at school and at home. They will learn all of the steps to proper handwashing, how to treat water, and how to keep their environment clean. The school will also be taught how to best oversee and maintain their new rainwater catchment tank and handwashing stations.

Handwashing Stations

Three handwashing stations will be delivered at the project’s completion. These are 1,000-liter plastic tanks fitted with four taps. The health club and school management will be responsible for making sure tanks are filled with water and that a cleaning agent such as soap or ash is available.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

We will build a 104,000-liter rainwater catchment tank for this school. This water will benefit the students, teachers, and supplementary staff. Parents will mobilize the materials needed for construction, such as sand and stone. They will also lend some strong arms to help with the actual construction.

The huge capacity of this tank makes the others look tiny in comparison; 104,000 liters should be enough water to carry students and staff through the entire dry season. As soon as the tank has time to cure, it can begin to collect rainwater for drinking, cooking, and cleaning!

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.



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