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The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  A Smile From Marion Chemutai
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Smile From Dickson Kipruto
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Tito The Artisan Installing The Gutter System
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Dome Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Artisans Taking A Lunch Break
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Catherine Inspecting Work
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Sand Delivering
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Digging Pits For The Latrines
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Pupils Delivering Water To Mix Cement
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Pupils Carrying A Brick From Home To School
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training On Tank Care
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Kipruto Dickson Responding To A Question
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Going To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Line For Latrine
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Small Plastic Storage Tank
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  School Kitchen
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  School Kitchen
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Classroom
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Staff
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Morning Chores
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Students Started Cleaning Upon Our Arrival
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  School Grounds
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Students At The Gate
The Water Project: Bojonge Primary School -  Some Students And Administration

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 385 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Apr 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 05/23/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Bojonge Primary School is located in the outskirts of Shiru Town in Kenyor Village. The entire area is vegetated in the highlands, and a majority of the villagers work on tea and maize plantations.

On arrival at Bojonge, one first spots the playing field. The schools buildings are far from the gate. Bojonge has nine classes including the early education department, with an enrollment of 371 students. The school also has a great kitchen from where teachers’ meals are prepared.

The buildings are in good condition, but the school is still missing something very important: There isn’t enough water on school grounds. This forces students to do the work of finding, fetching, and carrying enough water for drinking, cooking staff lunch, and cleaning.

Students most often go to a spring in the village.

Upon visiting the spring, our first thought was to not only provide water for the students at school but to protect this spring for the community too. But upon talking with the landowner, we learned that this spring has a very low yield which does not make it a good candidate for protection.

Since these students are still young, they carry small plastic containers no larger than 10 liters. These are dunked directly into the spring until full.

Kenyor Village as a whole does not have enough water. People have to walk long distances to nearby villages to fetch this precious commodity when the spring dries up. Due to the lack of clean water, the school has opted not to prepare lunch for the pupils. And any water that the students bring back is used up quickly.

“As you know, water is life and without it our bodies will stop functioning. Unavailability of clean, sufficient water generally affects the smooth running of our institution, and this shows in our general performance as a school,” shared Teacher Rosbella Tirop.

The water from the spring is dirty and causes students to suffer from waterborne illnesses like typhoid.

What we can do:

Training

Training on good hygiene habits will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as handwashing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

“Our school has had a big challenge when it comes to toilets. The number of doors available are not sufficient for our pupils and this has affected our time management as the pupils waste much time going to relieve themselves,” said Deputy Headteacher William Kosgey.

“It is our prayer that you assist us put up extra facilities to curb the situation.”

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!

Project Updates


04/02/2019: Bojonge Primary School Project Complete

There is a new rainwater catchment system at Bojonge Primary School! Students have a source of safe, clean water thanks to your support. Handwashing stations were installed so that students can clean up after using their new latrines, and students and staff have received training in sanitation and hygiene.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

Construction of this new rainwater catchment tank was a big success!

“Since I was posted in this school, I have had a challenge when it comes to availability of water. We at times requested our pupils to go fetch water even during class hours and this has always interrupted learning hours,” said Headteacher Indeche.

“We have had cases of stomach problems and this normally is related to contaminated water but we thank God that we have been considered for the project. From now on, we will no longer walk out of school compound going to fetch water thanks to our partners!”

The Process:

Our staff and the school administration started by looking around the school to determine the best location for their new rainwater catchment tank. This needed to be the best site with good, clean roofing to catch the rainwater.

Students were excited about this project and supported our artisans a lot. They delivered water for the artisans to mix cement and carried a brick each morning from home to help build the brick-walled latrines.

Students were eager to help because they knew that with the tank’s completion, they would no longer have to regularly carry water to school.

Then, we cleared the tank site: excavating the soil within the required measurements to make level ground for the tank foundation. The foundation was cast by laying stones on level ground and then reinforcing it using steel, concrete and waterproof cement.

Placing a metal mesh to reinforce the tank walls as the foundation dries

Both the drawing pipe as well as the washout pipe were affixed as the foundation was lain. The wall was built with ferro-cement techniques through six layers. The inner wall was plastered while rough casting was done on the outer part.

The catchment area was dug, plastered, and a staircase installed so students can easily get water from the tap. A metal cover with a lock was placed over the catchment area to avoid water wastage.

The school cook and parents prepared lunch for the artisans and volunteers each day

Dome construction could begin after the superstructure had been given enough time to settle. The manhole cover was fitted, inlet pipes were connected to the roof gutters, inlet screens, ventilation pipes (breathers) and overflow pipes were all done to standard.

Once finished, the tank was given three weeks to undergo complete curing before it was cleaned and handed over to Majengo Primary School, though we will continue to offer them great support as a part of our monitoring and maintenance program.

Handwashing Stations

Pupils can now enjoy washing their hands with soap thanks to the two handwashing stations that were delivered to their school. These new handwashing opportunities will help reduce cases of hygiene-related illness. The training on hygiene has motivated these students to share what they’ve learned with their peers at school and families at home.

Girls celebrating their new handwashing station

VIP Latrines

This project funded the installation of six new ventilated improved pit latrines. All of these new latrines have cement floors that are easy to use and clean. And with a rainwater catchment tank, there should be enough water to keep them clean all the time.

These latrines were built in pairs because of loose soil on school grounds; four latrine doors are for the boys and two are for the girls.

New Knowledge

We worked with the headteacher to plan a hygiene and sanitation training for both students and staff. Students representatives were selected from classes seven, six, and five. Those who were selected to attend training have formed a child to child (CTC) health club that will promote good health among peers and families back at home.

The training required at least 15 participants, but there were three extra students. The three participants had a strong interest in training and requested if they could join, and of course, the facilitator accepted.

Students listening and taking notes with their new notebooks and pens during training

The students and their teachers needed knowledge on how to improve standards of hygiene and ensure that the sanitation facilities given to them are well-maintained for years to come. Some of the topics we covered included water pollution and treatment methods, handwashing, dental hygiene, operations and maintenance of the facilities, and group dynamics along with leadership and governance for the newly formed CTC health club.

Students mirror the trainer during a handwashing demonstration

Students particularly enjoyed the session on what makes a good leader, which preceded the election for CTC club leadership. Each student was eager to be elected as a leader and believed they had what it takes. They also liked the dental hygiene demonstration on how to brush teeth.

Having learned that one is not supposed to rinse his/her mouth out after brushing, participants were left wondering. Ms. Chemutai asked, “what will be left of the Colgate in the mouth?” The trainer was able to respond that the toothpaste left in the mouth is not dangerous at all, because all they need to use to brush is a pea-sized amount.

“What a day!” said 12-year-old Dickson.

“We have learned new information that will automatically change our hygiene standards and as beneficiaries of today’s training, we promise to disseminate this important information to the rest of the school and the village at large,”

Thank You for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 35-kenya19007-a-smile-from-marion-chemutai


02/06/2019: Bojonge Primary School Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Bojonge Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to build a clean water point on school grounds and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 14-kenya19007-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

Project Underwriter - Romac Industries
Doc Taylors of Virginia Beach
4 individual donor(s)