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The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Mbone And Mr Kiprotich Are Delighted With The Water Tank
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Celebrating Water In The Tank
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Amos And Brian At The Tank
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Ashley Washing Her Hands
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Agatha Washing Her Hands
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  New Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Children Carrying Wood To The Construction Site
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Delivering Sand
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Mixing Cement
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training On Tank Care
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training On Tank Care
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training On Water Treatment
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training On Water Treatment
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Dental Hygiene
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Dental Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Ruto Joseph
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Trash Disposal
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Deputy Headteacher Biwot Paul
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Delivering Some Water To Kitchen
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Arriving At School With Water Again
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Going To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Going To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Parents Pay Fees With Food
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Teachers Outside Grading
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  Class Break
The Water Project: Kapkemich Primary School -  School Gate

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 11/09/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Kapkemich Primary School was just served a closure notice for not having water or enough latrines on school grounds. If something isn’t done in the next few months, the gate will close to the 838 students attending here.

Students have to leave school in search of water throughout the day. The surrounding community is so rural and peaceful that the only noise heard throughout the day comes from students as they fetch water.

They frequent a spring several hundred meters into the community. The spring is overgrown, and one of the teachers says that the concrete and discharge pipes were built up even before mobile phones came to Kenya. There is a steep slope that leads from the school to the spring, which gets very slippery when it rains. It’s also hard to get back up with heavy containers of water.

That spring is shared with community members, so students sometimes have to wait in line before they’re allowed their turn. Teachers have to accompany students to the spring to help explain their need to the community members. The water discharge speed is low, so students have to wait for a long time before their containers fill with water. This spring dries in the months of January, February, and March. This is when students face a lot of trouble as they have to look for water from other springs that are very far from school. Students waste so much valuable class time out finding enough water.

“The water we have here is little, and also very dirty. That is why we have continued to suffer from diarrhea and stomachaches,” said Teacher Biwot.

“We need to do something before the situation becomes worse.”

What we can do:

“There is an urgent need to improve in the area of sanitation and hygiene,” said Librarian Ruto.

“We don’t even have a compost pit. Our rubbish is just disposed in a secluded, open place. If we do nothing our children may suffer or even die as a result of poor sanitation and hygiene.”

Training

Training on good hygiene habits will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

The school only has one handwashing facility improvised from a 20-liter jerrycan too small to serve the entire school. In addition to that, it is placed out in the field not close to any latrines since it is expected to serve all students, both boys and girls. Unfortunately, not every student takes the time to walk there or to get water to fill the facility when it’s empty. This explains why most students just run back to class straight after using latrines without washing hands.

Two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

There are only eight latrines per gender, meaning the ratio is really one latrine per 100 students. There are so many students using very few latrines, which makes them dirty within a very short time.

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!

Project Updates


05/21/2019: Kapkemich Primary School Project Complete

There is a new rainwater catchment system at Kapkemich Primary School! Students have a source of safe, clean water thanks to your support. Handwashing stations were installed so that students can clean up after using their new latrines, and students and staff received training in sanitation and hygiene.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

Construction of this new rainwater catchment tank was a big success.

“We are very proud that we now have a big water storage tank built for us and within our reach. We look forward to utilizing the convenience brought by this tank by capitalizing on the time saved to engage more in academic-related activities,” said 13-year-old Jebet.

“The tank has also helped in assuring the security of girls. In the previous years it was very unsafe for us to go looking for water in the bushes or in places away from the safe watching eyes of responsible people. We lived in great fear. But now this water point is my pride, my hope and my reason to trust God for better, greater, and more honorable things in life.”

The school was dealing with a closure notice it had been given by the health inspection team, and everyone was very concerned. When the idea about the project was introduced to the school staff by the headteacher, they only thought of him as a daydreamer.

However hard the headteacher, Mr. Wycliffe Isatia, tried to explain to them that he has had firsthand experience with our organization at a previous school he worked at, they hardly believed him. So when the hardware materials were finally delivered to the school, the school fraternity was amazed and so delighted that they could not wait to set their eyes on the construction process.

They supported the project by collecting all of the extra local resources like stones and sand, and ensuring that pupils fetch water for the artisans to mix cement. The deputy headteacher, Mr. Paul Biwot and the librarian, Mr. Joseph Ruto, were so excited about the water tank that they invited us to visit their home villages to help them improve the water infrastructure there. People’s willingness and vigor throughout the whole process was encouraging and gives us high hopes that they will manage the project very well.

The Process:

Our staff and the school administration started by looking around the school to determine the best location for their new rainwater catchment tank. This needed to be the best site with good, clean roofing to catch the rainwater.

Upon the decision of the construction site, the top earth layer is excavated and cleared. Stones are then carefully packed onto the excavated area to create a strong foundation.

The foundation is cast with sand, cement, ballast, and waterproof cement. As this is being done, the wall’s skeleton of wire mesh and rebar is erected and secured into the foundation. Upon completion of the foundation, the walls are cemented and plastered to completion both inside and outside.

The catchment area is dug, plastered, and a staircase installed so students can easily get water from the tap. A metal cover with a lock is placed over the catchment area to avoid water wastage.

A concrete reinforcement pillar is built up to support the dome, which is also made of a strong wire mesh and concrete. A hatch is installed in the dome to allow the tank to be cleaned out before heavy rain, and the gutter system is also installed at this time.

Once finished, the tank was given three weeks to undergo complete curing before it was cleaned and handed over to Kapkemich Primary School, though we will continue to offer them great support as a part of our monitoring and maintenance program.

Handwashing Stations

Pupils can now enjoy washing their hands with soap thanks to the two handwashing stations that were delivered to their school. These new handwashing opportunities will help reduce cases of hygiene-related illness. The training on hygiene has motivated these students to share what they’ve learned with their peers at school and families at home.

VIP Latrines

This project funded the installation of six new ventilated improved pit latrines, three latrine doors for the boys and three latrine doors for the girls. All of these new latrines have cement floors that are easy to use and clean. And with a rainwater catchment tank, there should be enough water to keep them clean all the time.

New Knowledge

The school headteacher helped to plan the schedule for training and to recruit participants. He managed to get representation from community members, local leaders, teachers, staff, the school board of management, students, and from the neighboring church. The students in attendance formed a child to child (CTC) health club that will share what they learned with their peers and families at home. The adults in attendance came together as the water committee, which will oversee the project.

All of the attendees were actively involved in discussions and learning topics. When they were told to view their community as a tree which has parts such as roots (actors/contributors), trunk (representing positive change), branches (influence of change), and fruits (benefits of change), they got excited and wanted to pay more attention during training to learn how to reap the fruits of this project. The participants were also very interested in how to control birds (threats to the fruits) that could derail the gains that came with the efforts that had been put in so far.

We taught students how to improve standards of hygiene and ensure that the sanitation facilities given to them are well-maintained for years to come. Some of the topics we covered included:

– water pollution and ways to treat water for drinking


– handwashing

The concept of making handwashing facilities from locally available resources really motivated the participants to embrace handwashing. They were amazed that leaky tins and tippy-taps require so little to be made. To make a leaky tin, a small hole is created near the bottom of a three-liter jerrycan and then a stick is used to seal it. The container is then filled with clean water and suspended on a tree so that users can simply wash their hands by unblocking the hole.

The demonstration on how to make either of the handwashing facilities only required a little bit of time, use of any container, clean water, and ash as the handwashing agent. Pupils were delighted when they realized how simple the procedure is. They promised to replicate the same idea in their homes.

– dental hygiene


– personal and environmental hygiene
– group dynamics along with leadership and governance for the newly formed CTC health club and water committee

Both the CTC club and the water management committee were formed at this point, and various people were assigned roles of leadership.

– operations and maintenance of the facilities

The school was at the brink of being closed down due to its inability to meet the minimum standard concerning sanitation and other basic facilities an institution should have. Having to constantly leave school and go out to collect dirty water was draining these students and staff. Thus, they were very interested to see to it that every possible strategy is put in place to keep that from ever happening again.

“I promise to go home and make either a leaky tin or a tippy-tap for my personal use, and I will go from home to home checking if these pupils have put into practice what we are learning today. We can no longer fail to wash our hands after visiting the latrine when we have been taught the simplest way to do so,” said parent John Chepkwony.

Thank You for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 35-kenya19022-flowing-water


04/03/2019: Kapkemich Primary School Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Kapkemich Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to build a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out again with news of success!


The Water Project : 9-kenya19022-arriving-at-school-with-water-again


Project Videos


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

YourCause Pfizer Matching Gift
Harrison Family Charity
Mercersburg Elementary Campaign for Water
CRMS's Campaign for Water
Sparkle Naturally Bath
bfree skincare campaign for water

And 2 other fundraising page(s)
7 individual donor(s)