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The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Roselida Siole
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Storing Water From The Spring
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Carrying Water Back To School
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Community Spring
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Going To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  A Classroom Split In Two
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  A Classroom Split In Two
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  School Cook Washing Containers
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  School Cook Carrying A Meal Across The Road
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Students Cleaning Their Classroom
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Girls Playing During Break
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Jemmimah Talking To The Deputy Headteacher
The Water Project: Magaka Primary School -  Students And Staff Posing In Front Of Classrooms

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Funded - Project Initiated
Estimated Install Date (?):  10/31/2019

Project Features


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Magaka Primary School is still new and under development; it is very needy and lacks many facilities. It doesn’t have enough classrooms for 193 pupils, so some classes need to share the same room. These classes are partitioned with reeds and these teachers constantly contend with the noise from the other half of the room. Teachers do not have a staffroom and instead sit under the trees for shade.

If it’s too sunny or rainy, they sit in the classrooms with pupils. The kitchen that is used to prepare meals for staff is across the road at a church. It is risky for the cook as she has to cross the busy road with meals.

Most importantly, the school does not have its own source of water. Students must leave class and get water for drinking, cleaning, and other purposes when they need it. These students most often walk to a spring in the community. The distance is not too far, but it is down a steep slope where pupils have to use a lot of energy to keep from tripping. This is very tiresome for the pupils who need to get right back to studying upon their return from the spring. The pupils also have to cross a very busy road with racing motorcycles and cars.

When students return with their containers full of water, they pour some in plastic filters and bring the rest to the kitchen. The water in these three filters is used up quickly, and students need to find more water to fill them again.

Whether from dirty water or poor sanitation, there were 50 students registered absent during our visit.

“We are suffering in this school in getting clean water for drinking,” shared Teacher Roselida Siole.

“Teachers share with the pupils the little containers which only hold a little amount of water and thus makes us to carry [more] from home. The efforts that are put to ensure the pupils get to the spring safe and back wastes a lot of time which could be converted into preps that will add more impact in the pupils’ performance.”

What we can do:

Training

Training on good hygiene habits will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as handwashing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

The school is in crisis when it comes to bathroom facilities. It only has one latrine door for boys and it is built adjacent to the teachers’ doors. And on the other side, there’s the boys’ urinal. It is very chaotic for the teachers to get to the toilets while the boys are there too.

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

Project Underwriter - Cornivinus Trading ltd
The Tiny Pebbles Foundation