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The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Angel
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Kitchen Where Some Of The Water Is Used
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Outside Classrooms
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  School Staff
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Students Arriving At School With Water
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Students Arriving At School With Water
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Road To The School
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  Students Arriving At School
The Water Project: Elufafwa Community School -  School Sign

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  08/31/2019

Project Features


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There is no water at Elufafwa Primary School – and yet 350 students attend classes there on a daily basis.

In a vote to address water scarcity, the school purchased two plastic water tanks. Unfortunately, these plastic tanks no longer hold water.

Students get through the school day by carrying containers of water from home each morning. They come with water from home and some are tempted to even draw from stagnant water on their way; anything to avoid carrying heavy containers such a long distance.

Since students are dismissed for lunch, they are asked to fill their water containers once again. Still, two 5-liter containers of water each day is barely enough between students’ drinking needs, the lunch program for the graduating class, and cleaning.

Students arrive at school very tired and must ration the little water they have. Since just last year enrollment has dropped significantly from 495 to 350 because of lack of water and good hygiene.

“Lack of water in this school makes it very difficult to attain all the goals we need. Pupils are forced to go look for water at the expense of their learning and studying,” said Mr. Owenga, the deputy headteacher.

“Sometimes the latrines are not cleaned because we don’t carry to school enough water to clean the latrines,” said 12-year-old Angel.

What we can do:

Training

Training on good hygiene habits will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

VIP Latrines

A public health official recently visited the school for inspection and condemned the latrines, asking the school to do something because the latrines do not meet sanitation and hygiene standards.

We will build two triple-door latrines with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Handwashing Stations

We will deliver two handwashing stations to the school, and the CTC club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

St. Gertrude Church
Given in loving memory of Charles Van Der Horst
4 individual donor(s)