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The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Women Sit On Their Containers Waiting For Their Turn To Fill Them With Water
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Buckets Lined Up Waiting To Be Filled At The Well
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Deputy Principal Winfred Sammy
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Donkeys And Containers At The Riverbed
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Donkeys Loaded Up With Containers Filled With Water To Take Back To The School
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Fetching Water From The Well
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Jacob Sila
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Joyce Kabwere
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Ongoing Class
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Playing Area
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  School Grounds
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  School Sign
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Small Raintwater Tank
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Some Of The People Waiting To Use The Water Source
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Staff Latrines
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Students
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Studying
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Temporary Classroom
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Volleyball Net
The Water Project: Nyanyaa Secondary School -  Boys Latrines

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  02/29/2020

Project Features


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Nyanyaa Secondary School is found in a silent, rural location just outside Nyanyaa shopping center. The extensive rural location is characteristic of low vegetation cover and is sparsely populated. The few homesteads visible were made of mud and roofed with iron sheets, with other homes being more exotic and made of bricks and well covered with iron sheets.

Nyanyaa Secondary School was started in 2011 as an initiative of local parents with support from Mwingi North Constituency Development Fund (CDF). The affirmative action fund supported the school in the construction of its first classes. The school has no official sponsor and has been operating as a District Education Board School, growing through support from the government, parents, and the CDF.

The school is found in a small piece of land shared with Nyanyaa Primary School, where it has only four classrooms, a staff room, playground, and a temporary kitchen. Other facilities, including the latrines, are shared between the secondary and primary school counterparts.

The current water source is a community water point at Mwania River which is accessed by all members of the public within Kalima Mundu Village. It is these same community members who are parents at the school and are working hard to make a water tank project at their school a reality.

On the day of our visit, which was around noon, more than 50 people were queuing to get water with each of them having an average of four 20-liter containers and one donkey. More people were still coming. The scene painted the true picture of how crowded the lone water point was on an average day.

“The state of water affairs in our school is seriously in need,” Deputy Principal Winfred Sammy said.

“Water delays have led to interruptions of school routine and unrest among students.”

The school has contracted donkey vendors who supply them with water at a cost of 10 shillings ($0.10) for every 20-liter container. The school buys about 400 liters of water on a daily basis – a cost of $2 per day.

Buying water has been expensive for the young school, which needs to allocate more resources towards academic-related activities such as lab construction and classroom expansion. Agriculture students are required to walk down to the river and fetch water for watering their own crops; this has led to many students abandoning the subject as well as also poor grades in national exams.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Rainwater Catchment Tank

We will build a 104,000-liter rainwater catchment tank for this school. This water will benefit the students, teachers, and supplementary staff. Parents will mobilize the materials needed for construction, such as sand and stone. They will also lend some strong arms to help with the actual construction.

The huge capacity of this tank makes the others look tiny in comparison; 104,000 liters should be enough water to assist students and staff during the dry season. As soon as the tank has time to cure, it can begin to collect rainwater for drinking, cooking, and cleaning!

Handwashing Stations

Three handwashing stations will be delivered at the project’s completion. These are 1,000-liter plastic tanks fitted with four taps. The health club and school management will be responsible for making sure tanks are filled with water and that a cleaning agent such as soap or ash is available.

Training

Students and staff will be trained for one day. Those in attendance will form a school health club that will promote good hygiene and sanitation practices both at school and at home. They will learn all of the steps to proper handwashing, how to treat water, and how to keep their environment clean. The school will also be taught how to best oversee and maintain their new rainwater catchment tank and handwashing stations.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors