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The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  School Entrance
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Surrounding Area
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  School Grounds
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Playground
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Boys Latrines
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Girls Latines
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  School Cook Inside The Kitchen
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Teacher Leads Students In Class
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Acting Dishrack
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Lyevone Lutah
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Principal Bernard
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Current Water Source A Small Rain Tank
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Collecting Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Collecting Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Collecting Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Khwihondwe SA Primary School -  Water Storage

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 382 Served

Project Phase:  Under Construction
Estimated Install Date (?):  03/31/2020

Project Features


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”Sometimes we can arrive at school late and upon arriving, if we find there is no water in the school, the teacher on duty will send us back to go and fetch water either from a spring or at home – something that makes us tired and consequently unfocused the whole day,” said Yvonne, a 13-year-old student at Khwihondwe Salvation Army (SA) Primary School.

The only source of water at Yvonne’s school is a small 5,000-liter plastic rain tank, which students access through 6 taps that are piped underground and come up beside the tank. With 370 students and 12 teachers and staff on campus each day, the tank runs dry quickly and the school still depends on students bringing water from home for their daily water needs.

It is hard to know how safe the water is that students bring, yet because it is their only option, the pupils and teachers drink it. They mostly suffer from typhoid, diarrhea, and even cases of flu, but they keep silent because they cannot pinpoint which water source out of the combined water is the problem.

Khwihondwe SA Primary is a young school founded in 2012 by the Salvation Army Church, students and staff at Khwihondwe are still waiting for several things: a school sign, a proper gate, but most importantly: water.

This has forced the administration to make a duty roster to assign a rotating weekly schedule for which pupils will carry water from home. The pupils find it hard and tiresome, they say. When the same class brings water from home and it is not enough for the day, they are forced to go and search for water in a nearby spring where the community members discourage them from fetching water by denying them the chance to fetch it first. This wastes a great deal of time for students and the teachers who accompany them.

”Personally I have a water disease history that makes me not comfortable taking water that I don’t know or am not sure of its source,” said Principal Mr. Bernad Rafimbi.

“I usually carry my water in a bottle to school to avoid drinking the water brought from home by pupils. I also find and see the burden of pupils carrying water from home being too much for them…A majority of the students are vulnerable. Getting something to eat at home is a problem, and then to have the teacher on duty make sure enough water is brought into the school – it is straining for them.”

Another negative consequence of the students bringing water from home is the frequency of conflicts that always break the relationship between the school and the community. Since the pupils are using their parents’ jerrycans, parents come to school and quarrel with either their children, staff, or both. Consequently, there is no peace at this school.

The school’s sanitation and hygiene status is not good since the school does not have enough water to clean their classrooms, latrines, dishes, or food properly. All girls and boys have just 2 doors of latrines each, and they do not wash their hands after visiting them because there is nowhere and not enough water to do so. This is putting themselves and others at risk of contracting many different diseases.

”I have been praying since you came into this school for vetting…that may God do something for our school to at least be considered, and I thank God so much for answering those prayers with immediate effect. I am appreciating so much The Water Project for your intervention. The school has been time and again threatened to be given a closure letter because of sanitation and hygiene. This is a great favor we are going to receive. I can say it is a miracle to this school and I am promising to work in harmony with you,” said Principal Rafimbi.

What we can do:

Rain Tank

A 75,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will help collect the needed construction materials such as sand, bricks, rocks, and water for mixing cement. We will complement their materials by providing an expert team of artisans, tools, hardware, and the guttering system. Once finished, this tank will begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff for drinking, handwashing, cooking, cleaning, and much more.

We and the school strongly believe that all of these components will work together to improve standards at this school, which will help lead to better student academic performance and will help unlock the opportunity for these students to live better, healthier lives.

Handwashing Stations

There is currently nowhere for students to wash their hands after using the latrines or before eating lunch, let alone the water to do so.

The student health club will oversee the 2 new handwashing stations we will provide, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The club leaders will fill the handwashing stations with water daily and make sure they are always supplied with a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

2 triple-door latrine blocks will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. 3 doors will serve the girls while the other 3 will serve the boys. All of these new latrines will have cement floors that are designed to be easy to use and to clean. And with a rain tank right on school property, there should be enough water to keep them clean.

Training

We will hold a 1-day intensive training on improved hygiene, health, and sanitation habits at this school. Our team of facilitators will use a variety of methods to train students and staff, including participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) and asset-based community development (ABCD). We will initiate a child-to-child (CTC) student health club, which will prepare students to lead other pupils into healthy habits at school and at home. We will also lead lectures, group discussions, and provide illustrative handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good hygiene practices within the school. We will then conduct a series of follow-up trainings before transitioning to our regularly scheduled support visits throughout the year.

Project Updates


02/11/2020: Khwihondwe SA Primary School Project Underway!

A severe clean water shortage at Khwihondwe SA Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 20-kenya20002-student-carrying-water-2


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

Project Underwriter - Marcia and Phillip Rothblum Foundation
True Homes Foundation, Inc.
Jade Industries, Inc.
Numined Diamonds
Our Family Holiday Donation
Alpha Mennonite Church
Drink 4 Africa
KPMG Gives c/o Bergen County's United Way
Microsoft Matching Gift
North Dunedin Baptist Church
Prospect United Methodist Church
State Farm Companies Foundation
LinkedIn, Inc
Bounce Treatment Services, LLC
Google, Inc
LinkedIn, Inc.
Sweet Home M. B. Church
Pfizer Foundation
Pfizer Matching Gift Program
Toscas Birthday
The Gene Eye Foundation
The Clorox Group
Henniker Congregational Church
Total Quality Logistics, LLC
Jonny Blockchain
Microsoft Matching Gifts
Morgan Stanley
Liberty Mutual
Liberty Mutual
91 individual donor(s)