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The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students Carrying Water
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Student Pulling Water From The Well
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Well Water Source
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Student Pulling Water From The Well
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students Carrying Water
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students Carrying Water
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Spring Water Source
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students Waiting In Line At The Spring
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Student Fetching Water At The Spring
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Student Brian Noah
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Deputy Principal Kenneth Mulongo
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Surrounding Area
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Playground
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Boys Latrines
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Inside The Kitchen
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Kitchen With Firewood Outside
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  School Grounds
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students Bicycles To Get To School
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Administration Block
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Sign
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Sign
The Water Project: ACK St. Peter's Khabakaya Secondary School -  Gate

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  07/15/2020

Project Features


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“We do not wash our hands or even our cups and plates after using them because there is no water for that. We eat knowing that our hands are dirty and that’s why I keep on experiencing diarrhea,” said Brian, a student at ACK St. Peter’s Khabakaya Secondary School.

This school has 2 drinking water points, and yet not enough safe or reliable water for its 239 students and 16 teachers and staff.

In the morning, students fetch water from the protected hand-dug well on their campus, but the water level is very shallow and it becomes dirty after a few draws. Then, it dries up completely. Then there is the protected spring off-campus, which is shared with the community and takes away a great deal of precious school time when students have to walk to it, wait their turn to fill up, and return to school. The pathway to the spring is bushy and some students have reported encountering snakes on their way there.

Students and staff alike report water-related diseases like typhoid, amoeba, and diarrhea. The distance from the school to the spring and back causes body aches in the students. They must also deal with constipation, a consequence of not having enough water to drink. Some students skip school altogether, too deterred by the task of fetching water every day to feel like the time in class would ever pay off.

There are just 2 plastic drums used to store water for kitchen use, but these same drums are shared for construction work and consequently get contaminated. Students must empty the water they collect into these drums, so if they want any personal drinking water they must either fetch it at the source or bring it from home. If the water is running low during the day, students are sent back out to fetch more during a morning break between classes and during the lunch block.

Pupils are asked to bring all of their own cups and dishes to school for their snack and lunch breaks, and they are responsible for cleaning them but they remain dirty since there is no water to wash them. There are no dishracks at the school either which would allow washed dishes to dry without being contaminated from the ground.

The classrooms and latrines suffer a similar fate, going uncleaned for most of the week due to a lack of water. Students’ cases of waterborne diseases are heightened by the lack of any handwashing facilities in the school.

“Hygiene is compromised since the water is not enough to allow daily cleaning. We also don’t have enough drinking water. We had connected a pump to the well but it kept on breaking down. In fact, we are planning to shut down this well because it is not serving us well,” said Deputy Principal Mr. Kenneth Mulongo.

What we can do:

Rain Tank

A 75,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will help collect the needed construction materials such as sand, bricks, rocks, and water for mixing cement. We will complement their materials by providing an expert team of artisans, tools, hardware, and the guttering system. Once finished, this tank will begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff for drinking, handwashing, cooking, cleaning, and much more.

We and the school strongly believe that all of these components will work together to improve standards at this school, which will help lead to better student academic performance and will help unlock the opportunity for these students to live better, healthier lives.

Handwashing Stations

There is currently nowhere for students to wash their hands after using the latrines or before eating lunch, let alone the water to do so.

The student health club will oversee the 2 new handwashing stations we will provide, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The club leaders will fill the handwashing stations with water daily and make sure they are always supplied with a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

2 triple-door latrine blocks will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. 3 doors will serve the girls while the other 3 will serve the boys. All of these new latrines will have cement floors that are designed to be easy to use and to clean. And with a rain tank right on school property, there should be enough water to keep them clean.

Training

We will hold a 1-day intensive training on improved hygiene, health, and sanitation habits at this school. Our team of facilitators will use a variety of methods to train students and staff, including participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) and asset-based community development (ABCD). We will initiate a child-to-child (CTC) student health club, which will prepare students to lead other pupils into healthy habits at school and at home. We will also lead lectures, group discussions, and provide illustrative handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good hygiene practices within the school. We will then conduct a series of follow-up trainings before transitioning to our regularly scheduled support visits throughout the year.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

7 individual donor(s)