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The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Deliver Water To The Kitchen
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Pose At School Gate
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students And Teachers
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Walk To Class
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Participating In Class
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Walk Back To Class From The Playground
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Dishrack Outside Kitchen
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Kichen
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Water Storage Inside The Kitchen
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Deptuy Head Teacher Joshpat Mahamba
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Administration Office
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Head Teacher Isaac Ambuyu
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Girls At Their Latrines
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Boys Lined Up At Their Latrines
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Student Collecting Water From Home
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  A Home Water Source
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Student Collecting Water From Home
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Student Collecting Water From Home
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Bringing Water To School
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Pupils Carrying Water To School
The Water Project: Gimarakwa Primary School -  Students Carrying Water To School

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 628 Served

Project Phase:  Under Construction
Estimated Install Date (?):  05/28/2021

Project Features


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Established in 1938 by the Pentecostal Assemblies of God Church of Kenya, Gimarakwa Primary School is consistently among the top-performing schools in its geographic zone. Last year, it was ranked as the best school with the highest mean grade. Despite this, there has always been a severe water shortage here.

Every day, the 614 students who attend here must carry water from home to school before their first classes begin at 7:00 am. When they return home for lunch, they must bring back another full container before their afternoon lessons commence. Each trip carrying water is tiresome and time-consuming, and students arrive feeling drained of energy. The 14 teachers and staff wonder how their students have been able to maintain their grades despite this extra burden. They are even more curious to know how much better their pupils could be doing if they removed the daily time and energy currently wasted while fetching water.

The only other source of water for this school is a small plastic rain tank on campus, but standing at just 10,000-liter capacity, it is nowhere near enough for the size of the student population. The tank runs dry quickly and often.

“I get complaints from the parents since accessing water is also a problem at home. Making the students carry the water to school puts more strain on their parents during the day,” said Head Teacher Mr. Isaac Ambuyu.

Because the school staff are not able to monitor the sources students choose at home to fetch water, some teachers do not trust the water’s integrity. Even if the sources offer clean water, the containers students use to carry it are not clean. Since water is combined for use at school, even 1 dirty container or contaminated sources means everyone is at risk of contracting waterborne diseases such as diarrhea and cholera.

“I don’t drink this water since I’m not sure about the main source. I have to spend 50 shillings every day on drinking water,” said Deputy Head Teacher Mr. Josphat Mahamba. But the expense of buying water is not an option for the students, so they are left with no choice but to consume the dirty water.

Water-related illnesses and their associated high rates of absenteeism are common. They also leave both parents and the school with high medical bills for the students’ treatment, forcing them to redirect financial resources that would have been used for other necessities into these bills.

What We Can Do:

Rain Tank

A 75,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will help collect the needed construction materials such as sand, bricks, rocks, and water for mixing cement. We will complement their materials by providing an expert team of artisans, tools, hardware, and the guttering system. Once finished, this tank will begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff for drinking, handwashing, cooking, cleaning, and much more.

We and the school strongly believe that all of these components will work together to improve standards at this school, which will help lead to better student academic performance and will help to unlock the potential for these students to live better, healthier lives.

Handwashing Stations

There is currently nowhere for students to wash their hands after using the latrines or before eating lunch, let alone the water to do so.

The student health club will oversee the 2 new handwashing stations we will provide, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The club leaders will fill the handwashing stations with water daily and make sure they are always supplied with a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

The latrines currently in use here are few in number compared to the student population. Most are without locks, and all of them give off a strong smell since students cannot properly clean them due to the severe water shortage.

2 triple-door latrine blocks will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. 3 doors will serve the girls while the other 3 will serve the boys. All of these new latrines will have cement floors that are designed to be easy to use and to clean. And with a rain tank right on school property, there should be enough water to keep them clean.

Project Updates


04/13/2021: Gimarakwa Primary School Project Underway!

A severe clean water shortage at Gimarakwa Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 19-kenya20135-students-deliver-water-to-the-kitchen


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Hey Dewy