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The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -
The Water Project: Esiandumba Secondary School -

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 292 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Mar 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 09/21/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the School

Esiandumba Secondary School began in 1974, but continuously encountered challenges that forced it to shut down. It picked back up in 2002, but has continued to struggle because families in the area don’t emphasize education. Many fathers are alcoholics, and women are left to eke out enough to provide for their child’s school fees. Most students who attend Esiandumba Secondary School come from impoverished families, most of which are led by either a single parent or grandparent.

The majority of enrolled students owe a huge number of fees. The principal, Madam Susan, has decided to limit the number of times she sends children back home to fetch fees, since many of them never come back. The principal talked about how there’s one girl in form three who is an orphan and has to take care of a younger sibling. She visits her maternal grandparents every weekend to beg for food, missing her Saturday lessons. Teachers understand her situation and do not punish her for this absence.

Students report to school by 6:30AM to do daily cleaning of grounds and classrooms, latrines and offices. Students that report late are given punishments like clearing brush by slashing. Morning studies go from 7AM to 7:50, with normal classes beginning at 8AM. Students take a break to drink black tea at 11AM, going back to class until their lunch break.

Students are served ‘githeri,’ a mixture of maize and beans every lunch. Those with allergies are given rice and greens. Afternoon classes go until 4PM when students play sports and games until they are sent home. Certain afternoons, boys are sent to fetch water for girls to mop the classrooms and offices.

Water Situation

This school has a 1,000-liter plastic tank for catching rainwater. This tank’s water is not nearly enough for the school’s needs. There are two different springs over one kilometer away. These springs were protected many years ago by a different organization, but are now in poor condition. Even if water was clean at the spring, contamination is likely during the long trip back to the school.

Esiandumba Secondary School administration often hires women to make the long trip to the spring, but cannot afford to keep up with this expenditure. Thus, the water scarcity issue at school is severe. Students don’t even have enough water to wash their hands after using the latrine or before eating.

When students fetch water, it is stored in their containers in the back of classrooms. When water is delivered by local women, it is stored in the kitchen.

Sanitation Situation

This school has received a notice from the Ministry of Education saying that if they don’t build more latrines soon, they risk closure. This is because the eight latrines they have are all very close to each other. Both genders using the bathroom this close to each other is against rules made by the Ministry of Education.

There are three hand-washing stations, but as was mentioned there isn’t nearly enough water to keep them supplied. Garbage is disposed of on the ground in between the boys and girls pit latrines.

The principal is very excited about hygiene and sanitation training. “Our boys and girls have suffered diseases caused by poor hygiene. We have tried to help them but it seems there is an area where we are not doing it well, and I strongly believe that hearing it from you will help them understand matters of health better,” she said.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training and Hand-Washing Stations

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school. This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as hand-washing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two hand-washing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 30,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will be constructed on school grounds. Teachers, students, and parents will gather the materials needed for this project, including sand, ballast, bricks, and hardcore. This contribution will fuel a sense of responsibility for the school and community to take care of their new facilities. Once materials are mobilized, the WEWASAFO team will arrive to lead the construction effort.

With adequate clean water, the school will have water for drinking, cooking, cleaning, hand-washing, and irrigation!

This water source will only be open to students and staff. Outsiders will not be allowed to carry water from the school. By enforcing this rule, the tank will have water and be able to serve the school for a long time.

Plans: VIP Latrines

These six new VIP (ventilation improved pit latrine) latrines will be split into three doors for each gender. Latrine materials will be mobilized the same way as the tank, ensuring the school feels these facilities are truly theirs.

School administration and parents are positive that with these new facilities and training, their students’ academic performance will improve. Students will be healthy and empowered to focus on what’s important!

Thank You for unlocking potential at Esiandumba Secondary School!

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Esiandumba Secondary School

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and latrines for Esiandumba Secondary School in Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.


The Water Project : yar_4633_1


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


Thank you for this good knowledge you have shared with us. Many times people perish due to lack of it, and I believe our lives are going to change for the better because we are now informed.

Principal Susan Okwemba

A Year Later: Esiandumba Secondary School

December, 2017

I can now confidently concentrate more on my studies without the fear of being told to go to the river to fetch water and thus improve on my academic performance.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Esiandumba Secondary School.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Esiandumba Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and latrines for Esiandumba Secondary School in Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.

The availability of abundant water in the school has helped the students to now have access to safe, clean water within their reach. Many of the students have been able to improve their academic performance. The witnessed changes are attributed to the availability of the 30,000 liters water tank done now completed at the school.

“As a school, we have been able to cut down on the expenses previously used to purchase water and use the same money on other school needs,” explains Dean of Studies Edwin Barasa. “Through the ministry of education, the government has allocated us some funds to expand our school compound for future expansion of projects. Students have registered very promising results in their academic performance as they spend more time in their studies. We are now comfortable unlike previous times where we had to buy water or hire people to bring them for us.”

“I can now confidently concentrate more on my studies without the fear of being told to go to the river to fetch water and thus improve on my academic performance,” shares 17-year-old Sharon Nyandoko. “The water available at the school is so safe and enough that I just drink as many glasses as possible not scared of becoming sick. Latrines that were installed has reduced congestion and also brought separation from sharing latrines from by both boys and girls which was really very embarrassing.”

This institution now has safe and clean water near to them which will greatly meet all their water needs. The environment looks good and clean because of the trees that always provide shades and act as a live fence for the school. Regular treatment is recommended so as to avert cases of water related diseases. Our staff will always be carrying out monitoring and evaluation of the project and coming up with suggestions on any intervention required in case there is need.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Esiandumba Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Esiandumba Secondary School – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

David J. Tsiang Foundation
1 individual donor(s)