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The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kolongolo Spring Catchment Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Program: IcFEM Water Projects

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase: 
Community Managed
Implementing Partner Monitoring Data Unavailable
Initial Installation: May 2013

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is part of IcFEM’s WaSH program, which includes multiple water source schemes as well as substantial community level hygiene promotion, and training on project operation and maintenance. 

What follows is a brief project outline direct from our partner: 

The spring is located in Manyoa village in Bungoma County. The area is largely occupied by farmers who grow maize, beans, small amounts of sugarcane and livestock rearing. 

The area has two rainy seasons with an average rainfall of 1200mm to 1800mm per annum. Despite the huge potential, many villagers struggle in life to make ends meet and over half of the population cannot afford rain water harvesting within their homes. Piped water is also a mirage to this segment of society.

Kolongolo spring therefore comes in handy for these villagers both for domestic use and watering their livestock. It is a permanent source that the community had made an effort to protect but the work was not long lasting. The spring is a major asset to the community-the risk of water-borne diseases like typhoid notwithstanding. The news of the intended work to protect the spring has been received with jubilation by the locals who see the move as the end of their misery.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Sponsors

Erick's Hope Inc.