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The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Sibanga Spring Catchment Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Program: IcFEM Water Projects

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase: 
Community Managed
Implementing Partner Monitoring Data Unavailable
Initial Installation: Jan 2013

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is part of IcFEM’s WaSH program, which includes multiple water source schemes as well as substantial community level hygiene promotion, and training on project operation and maintenance. 

What follows is a brief project outline direct from our partner: 

Sibanga Spring is in Sibanga village, Kimilili Rural Sub-location, Kimilili Location of Bungoma County. The area is mainly populated with small scale farmers focusing in maize and beans production. 

Though the area receives sufficient rainfall, water still remains a big issue in the rural areas like Sibanga. The villagers have to walk long distances to collect water for use from available natural sources that are usually susceptible to water-borne diseases.

The community has made several attempts to protect the spring in the past without much success mainly due to lack of technical expertise and resources. The project will therefore involve doing an overhaul construction so as to realise maximum benefits for the locals. 

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Sponsors


19 individual donors
execorehosting
Collen Krashesky
The Zitzman Family
Brownie Troop 501/ Gina Stelluti
Sahale's Bday donations
Christ United Methodist Church - Weirton
Finley Ivey's Fundraising Page