Loading images...
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Kamburu Spring Catchment Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Program: IcFEM Water Projects

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase: 
Community Managed
Implementing Partner Monitoring Data Unavailable
Initial Installation: Jan 2013

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is part of IcFEM’s WaSH program, which includes multiple water source schemes as well as substantial community level hygiene promotion, and training on project operation and maintenance. 

What follows is a brief project outline direct from our partner: 

Kamburu Spring is a water source found in Ranje sub-location, East Bukusu location of Bungoma County. Most of the area has a rich arable land and the residents specialise in maize, sweet potatoes and millet farming.  Others are traders in the nearby Bungoma town.

Whereas the area receives sufficient quantities of rainfall like the rest of the county, water remains a major hurdle to the development of the area. Apart from the broken Kamburu spring, the nearest water source is 2 kilometres away. Kamburu Spring was previously protected but its walls are now dangerously broken down with a soft ground surrounding the spring exposing the people community to the risk of falling down and sustaining injuries.

Protecting the spring will therefore mean protecting lives and reducing the distances covered in search of water     

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Sponsors