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The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -
The Water Project: Wuluvai Spring -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 270 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Nov 2016

Functionality Status:  Low/No Water or Mechanical Breakdown

Last Checkup: 08/21/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water and Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Wuluvai Spring is located in Minyika Village, Kivagala sub-location, North Maragoli location, Sabatia Ward, Sabatia sub-county of Vihiga County. Wuluvai Spring has been used for drinking water since its discovery by community members in 1924. Now, 270 people from 30 different households rely on this unprotected spring.

The people around Wuluvai Spring are peasant farmers who work the land every day. They grow crops such as sugarcane, potatoes, and other kinds of vegetables for their families, and grow crops to sell such as tea leaves. It is a hilly area that experiences a good level of rainfall.

We found out about Wuluvai Spring and the surrounding community while completing a project at Hedwe Spring. One of the community members who fetches water from Hedwe Spring mentioned the plight of their neighbors. When we heard this, we decided to pay a visit to Wuluvai Spring.

Water Situation

An unprotected spring is one that is open to contamination. Wuluvai Spring is particularly contaminated by nearby farms; when it rains, fertilizers and pesticides are washed into the water. Animal and human waste also joins the mix of contamination.

There is so much activity around the spring, between children playing and animals roaming free. The water is also dirtied during the fetching process. Women and children bring small containers to dunk for filling their larger 20-liter jerrycans. When full, the water container is supported on the head and carried approximately a half kilometer back home. When home, water is separated by use. Drinking water is stored in covered clay pots to keep it cool, and water for cleaning is either poured into 100-liter plastic containers or kept in the fetching container.

Some women boil or treat their water with chemicals before serving it to their families, but there is still a high risk of waterborne disease such as typhoid and cholera. Many people here choose to travel long distances in search of clean water instead of drawing it from their unprotected spring. We met Peter Kakeyi, a farmer who drinks the water from Wuluvai Spring. He said “I suffered a stomachache just a week ago after drinking raw water from this Wuluvai Spring!”

Sanitation Situation

Under half of households in this area have their own pit latrine. These are made with mud walls, grass, and rusty iron sheets. The floors are packed down with cow dung. The biggest challenge is floor upkeep; they get filthy but are near impossible to clean. During our visit, it was obvious that open defecation is an issue because of the lack of latrines.

We were able to find at least one place to wash hands, but more emphasis needs to be put on cleanliness. The community is ready and willing to attend hygiene and sanitation training to learn about the practices they can adopt to lead healthier lives.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

This community requires training on good hygiene and sanitation practices for them to improve the environment they live in. They will learn about how to keep a clean environment and maintain personal hygiene.

Community members will be trained for three days on a variety of health, hygiene and sanitation topics. This training will result in community members donning the roles of health workers and water user committee members. The training facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Training), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), and ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development) methods to teach community members, especially the women and children who feel the burden of household responsibility. Training will equip each person with the knowledge needed to practice viable and effective health solutions in their homes and at the spring.

During training, we will take this community on a transect walk to sensitize them to some of the more serious health threats. The transect walk will teach locals to watch for practices that go on and facilities that are present related to good health and hygiene. Sometimes, a participant feels shame when the group arrives at their household and points out things that are unhealthy or unhygienic; but in Kenya, this affects people to make a positive change. Training participants will also vote on and decide the families that should benefit from the five new sanitation platforms.

Plans: Sanitation Platforms

The five families chosen by the community will receive a sanitation platform, which is a concrete floor that makes a great foundation for a safe and clean latrine. These families will prepare by sinking a pit that the concrete slab can be placed over. These five new latrines will go a long way in reducing the level of open defecation in this community!

Plans: Spring Protection

Locals are eagerly preparing for this spring protection project. They have agreed to gather the local materials needed for construction to begin, which include sand, ballast, hardcore, bricks, fencing poles, and even some helpful hands!

These people are in need of safe and clean water to eliminate waterborne disease and thus save time and money that is spent on treatment. This time and money can be invested in economic activities. Students can stay in school all the time, and academic performance will improve.

Once Wuluvai Spring is protected, locals will have clean water for drinking, domestic chores, and farm irrigation.

Project Updates


12/15/2017: A Year Later: Wuluvai Spring

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection and sanitation platforms with the community near Wuluvai Spring in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.


The Water Project : 4580_yar_1


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


"As a mother, I am very much confident that we shall no longer worry about risks that we used to expose ourselves to by consumption of contaminated water. I have personally witnessed the transformation brought to this community!"

Emmy Agaziva

A Year Later: Wuluvai Spring

November, 2017

“Nowadays we fetch safe, clean water which is free from any contamination, thus, we are not getting sick.”

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Wuluvai Spring.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Wuluvai Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection and sanitation platforms with the community near Wuluvai Spring in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.

The community members are now able to access safe water and sound sanitation because of the protected spring. Before the project was initiated, many people used to consume contaminated water while others shared latrines with their neighbors.  The people of Wuluvai spring work tirelessly in their farms to ensure that they provide food for their families. The environment around the spring looks green and full of fresh air from the surrounding trees.

“I can really say yes my life has been changed by this project,” says community member Tokes Oyara. “Since last year, we are now able to use safe water from this protected spring. Also, some of us did not have our own latrines but since the introduction of sanitation platform, we have seen a very big difference.”

“Nowadays we fetch safe, clean water which is free from any contamination,” explains 9-year-old Joseph Kedemi. “Thus, we are not getting sick every now and then.”

The community could use more information on new techniques of overcoming emerging challenges regarding water and sanitation. The staff will be carrying out regular monitoring and evaluation to make any necessary interventions and will do more trainings when necessary.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Wuluvai Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Wuluvai Spring – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Christopher J Butz