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The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -
The Water Project: Hanington Mulanda Spring -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 250 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/13/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water and Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Hanington Mulanda Spring is located in Garagoli-Galilaya Community of Vihiga County, Kenya. It serves over 250 people from 20 different households, and that number is expected to grow when the spring is protected.

A normal day here starts with people getting up early in the morning to start work on their farms. The farmers grow what will earn them the most money, including sugarcane and bananas. They also grow many types of vegetables and cereals to eat in their own homes, selling the leftovers in the local market.

This community is entirely Christian, and thus named their village “Galilaya” which is inspired by Galilee, a biblical town.

Water Situation

Hanington Mulanda Spring is the closest water source to the village. Local women and children fetch water using plastic containers, as big as they can carry. Each person brings a smaller cup that they can dip in the spring to bail water and fill their container. The water is brought home and used for drinking, cooking, bathing, and watering animals.

Depending on the intended use, water is separated into different containers around the home. Covered clay pots are normally kept in the kitchen for cooking and drinking, a pail is filled next to the bathroom, and a container is left in the living room for drinking.

We know that Hanington Mulanda Spring is contaminated because of the numerous reports of waterborne disease. Our visit to the spring confirmed this fact; there were rotting tree fruits, leaves and garbage floating in the water. There was also a visible mold floating on the surface.

Sanitation Situation

A little over half of households have their own pit latrine. Most of these are made of wood floors, mud walls, and iron sheets for doors. The same number of homes have useful tools like dish racks and clotheslines for safely drying their belongings. However, this means that there is still at least a quarter of families who do not have latrines or other sanitation facilities.

People normally select a spot in the back of their compound to throw garbage. This is separated into piles to burn and to compost. The compost will be used on the farm as a fertilizer.

During our visit to the community, we met with so many people who were excited about training. They want to learn and are eager to adopt new practices to improve their health. When some people heard about the sanitation platforms we plan to build for latrines, they immediately returned home and started digging a pit.

Mr. Mulanda has been directly affected by the shortage of latrines in his village. He said, “Our people have been suffering a lot for lack of knowledge on health and hygiene. People share latrines like mine; I share with my neighbor which makes it fill up quickly. Please come and help us come out of this situation!”

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least three days. This training will ensure participants are no longer ignorant about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage.

Plans: Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new latrines.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Plans: Spring Protection

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will therefore help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

In addition, protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water.

We had the privilege of meeting with Mr. Mulanda, the landowner whom the spring is named after. “We as a community feel like we have been forgotten by our leaders because at times, we only hear of projects done in other parts of our land. This project is a great blessing to us. Our spring has always been there, but no one has ever thought of coming to our rescue by protecting the spring. It this water source is protected, it will help reduce cases of waterborne diseases.”

“Who knew that our spring will be protected at this generation,” he added, looking to his wife. Mrs. Mulanda has lived with her husband by the spring as long as she can remember. She told us, “My daughter and I have always been suffering from the use of this unprotected source of water. Medical records in our nearby health center show that we are in frequent attendance. This is because a month does not pass without one of us being admitted for using unsafe water. I know that soon, we are going to be healthy and no more going to the hospital. I feel a little bit healed now by the hopes that our spring is going to be protected.”

Project Updates


12/15/2017: A Year Later: Hanington Mulanda Spring

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection and sanitation platforms with the community near Hanington Mulanda Spring in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.


The Water Project : 4587_yar_1


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


A Year Later: Hanington Mulanda Spring

November, 2017

Since last year, many people can now access safe, clean drinking water. Previously, we used to consume dirty water which made many of us get sick every now and then

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Hanington Mulanda Spring.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Hanington Mulanda Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection and sanitation platforms with the community near Hanington Mulanda Spring in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Wilson Kipchoge, with you.

As you enter the compounds of many households, you will see a cleaner environment and better sanitation facilities. All these changes are attributed to the community health volunteers training that was held during project implementation and provision of sanitation platforms and the protected spring.

Speaking with chairperson Hanington Mulanda, he explained how things have positively changed in the last year. “Since last year, many people can now access safe, clean drinking water. Previously, we used to consume dirty water which made many of us get sick every now and then. Also, with the help of sanitation platforms, we could put up better sanitation facilities like mine where I was able to construct a permanent, two doors latrine with a bathroom.”

“Life has changed since last year because we spend less time in fetching water,” 9-year-old Ruth Minayo shares. “Unlike previous times where we used to spend a lot of time fetching water. Now that we have a new source of water, we consume very safe clean drinking water free from any contamination.”

People of Hanington Mulanda spring are hard working as they engage themselves in farms to cultivate them. They now have access to safe clean drinking water and a cleaner environment. The community needs to stay informed on the need to maximally secure their water through treating it. Management of their spring also needs to be regularly checked to avert any arising issues. The staff will be carrying out regular monitoring and evaluation to give any required recommendations and actions.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Hanington Mulanda Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Hanington Mulanda Spring – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Maryville High School
LBCS 5th Grade Class
The Solid Rock Community Church-Harvard, IL
6 individual donor(s)