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The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -
The Water Project: Simboyi Community -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 06/12/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water and Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Those living in Simboyi Village are all from the Maragoli sub-tribe of the Luyha tribe. Everyone in this area grows avocados and tea leaves, and some of the farms are still dotted with coffee trees. All of these crops are harvested to earn a living. Firing bricks is also an effective way for many men to earn money.

We discovered this spring during a project at Simboyi Primary School. Before the parents, students and teachers had a rainwater catchment tank, they would fetch water from this unprotected spring. When we visited the spring they were using, we realized just how many people were drinking its contaminated water.

Simboyi Village is adjacent to Inyail Village. The total population across this area is 1300 people from approximately 120 households. (Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people.  This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

Water Situation 

Imbiru Spring is located on Mr. Simon Ingweno’s land in Simboyi Village, Kigama of North Maragoli in Sabatia of Vihiga County. This unprotected spring serves approximately 120 households from Simboyi and Inyali villages. According to 75 year-old village elder Mr. Javan Asava, “These users from both villages can add up to at least 1300 people, not to mention pupils of Simboyi Primary School who used to come for water from this spring before they got the tank from TWP through WEWASAFO.”

People have to carefully walk down a steep pathway to the spring. Each person brings a small cup that they can dip in the spring to bail water and fill their water container, which is normally as large as they can carry. Whoever filled the large container will need help to get it back up the steep slope. The water is then brought home and used for drinking, cooking, bathing, and watering animals.

When home, water is separated into different containers by use. Drinking water is kept in covered pots either in the kitchen or living room. The rest of the water is dumped in larger plastic barrels and saved for cleaning and watering animals.

We know that Imbiru Spring is contaminated because of the numerous reports of waterborne disease. Our visit to the spring confirmed this fact; the water is out in the open with no barriers to protect it from erosion, surface runoff, and animals. People even step into the water to fetch it, or dip their hands in while filling the water jugs. The water is very turbid.

Sanitation Situation

Not all homes have their own pit latrine. These are made of mud and logs are suspended across the ground. These are smelly, since the logs used for the floors are near impossible to clean. Open defecation is an issue in this area, and the village elder has already been making a list to hold those people accountable.

We found three hand-washing stations among this entire population, and only one had soap available. Mr. Enos Eboso is one of those who had built his family a hand-washing station outside the latrine. Around half of households had other helpful sanitation facilities like dish racks or clotheslines.

Households are already practicing proper waste disposal. All of them collect leftovers to feed their animals, while even the animal waste is collected for fertilizer. Trash is separated between pits for composting and pits for burning.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least three days. This training will ensure participants are no longer ignorant about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage.

Plans: Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new latrines.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Plans: Spring Protection

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will therefore help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

In addition, protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. We met Alice Bukusa, a local farmer who has been using the spring for years. “There was a time we experienced serious diarrhea as a result of drinking raw water from this source. Protecting the spring will be a big step toward attaining safe and clean water,” she said.

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Simboyi Community

A year ago, generous donors helped protect Imbiru Spring in Simboyi Village, Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Jacqueline K. Shigali with you.


The Water Project : 4-4591-yar


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


A Year Later: Simboyi Community

December, 2017

Since the completion of the spring protection, there have been minimal cases of waterborne diseases among residents. People now know the best ways of treating water and now see the importance of using covers to cover their water containers.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Simboyi Community.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Simboyi Community maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped protect Imbiru Spring in Simboyi Village, Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Jacqueline K. Shigali with you.


Ever since the spring protection, there have been hygiene, sanitation, and health improvements here. Latrines and hand-washing stations that were constructed last year are still well-maintained. Containers that are brought to get clean water are scrubbed out and have covers. People have also learned how to treat water for drinking so there are no stomachaches or diarrhea. Many others are still practicing composting, and everyone has a garbage pit.

Mr. Asava and Michelle fetching clean water from Imbiru Spring.

Jacqueline met Javan Asava at Imbiru Spring to talk about what’s happened over the past year. He told her, “Since the completion of the spring protection, there have been minimal cases of waterborne diseases among residents. People now know the best ways of treating water and now see the importance of using covers to cover their water containers. The spring is well protected and water cannot be easily contaminated. The spring has enabled us to save a lot of money that we initially spent at hospitals treating diseases we could have prevented.”

12-year-old Michelle Adema was at the spring, too. She added that “since this project, there is a lot of improvement in class attendance. We do not get sick like we used to. This spring has helped curb diarrhea cases in the community so that I am always in school and not visiting the hospital.”


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Simboyi Community maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Simboyi Community – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


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