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The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -
The Water Project: Muraka Community -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Program: Kenyan Spring Protection

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Aug 2015

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/05/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water and Sanitation Forum. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

This unprotected spring is located in Muraka village, Muraka sub-location, Ilesi location, Isukha west ward, Kakamega-East sub-county, Kakamega County. The spring is serving a total population of 1027 individuals comprising of community members and pupils from Muraka primary school which does not have access to safe drinking water at the school. It serves 610 community members of which 285 males and 325 females and 417 pupils of which 210 are girls and 207 are boys.

(Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people.  This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

The community uses water for drinking, cooking, watering animals, and irrigation on the farms especially during the dry period. The spring is a good candidate for protection because it has a continuous supply of water even during dry season when other sources are completely dry. The community members and pupils of nearby school congest at the spring.

JUSTIFICATION

This unprotected water spring is located in a low area and is also surrounded by bushes, thus susceptible to contamination. Many people who lack latrines use the bushes for privacy and defecate close to the water point. During the rainy season the surface run off carries the waste into the water.

The community members reported that they have suffered from water borne diseases such as typhoid. This is a result of drinking water from the unprotected spring. Since the spring is unprotected, it is open to contamination by surface run off, people stepping into the water as they fetch, passersby drinking the water directly from the source, and animals also drinking from it.

A lot of time is also wasted by the women, children and also pupils from Muraka primary school queuing in order to fetch water.

Sanitation is also a big problem as many people do not have good latrines and others even use bushes. During the rainy seasons, the waste is washed into the spring leading to contamination of the water.

The community members are in dire need of support and are urging WEWASAFO and The Water Project to consider them and protect the spring so that they can reduce cases of water borne diseases and also reduce time wasted in order to engage in other economic activities.

Results of the Project: spring protection

Protection of Aliuba spring is now complete and in use.

The water is used for drinking, cooking, watering animals and irrigation on the farms especially during the dry period. The discharge from the spring is good and does not dry during dry seasons when other sources around the area are completely dry.

Cases of water borne diseases like typhoid which the community members reported to have suffered initially as a result of drinking unsafe water are expected to reduce because of the protection of the spring. Again, cases of contamination by surface run off, people stepping into the water as they fetch, passersby drinking the water directly from the source and animals drinking from it are all now a thing of the past after protection. The trained water Sanitation and management committees around the spring came up with the rules and regulation to govern the use of the spring so as to ensure its sustainability.

The community members around Aliuba spring are happy with the project and urged Wewasafo to protect other unprotected springs in the area so as to increase access to safe, adequate, clean drinking water.

Household sanitation platforms

The sanitation platforms (cement slabs for latrine construction) for the beneficiaries around Aliuba spring have been cast, installed and are now in use serving a total number of 46 people of which 21 are male and 25 are female. The community members admitted that it is comfortable using the slab because the floor is safe, easy to clean and maintain. They added that there are more community members who are in need of the slabs.

Project Updates


09/23/2015: Aliuba Sanplat Pictures

Just a quick note to let you know we just posted a couple pictures of a sanplat latrine. In the pictures you can see the cement floor of the latrine, making it safer for people to use and more protected from flies and odor. One more step toward unlocked potential!


The Water Project : kenya4372-58-sanplat-latrine


09/17/2015: Alibi Spring Protection Project Complete

We are excited to report that the project to bring clean water and sanitation to the community surrounding Aliuba spring is complete. The spring has been protected, the community has received training in sanitation and hygiene, and five households have received sanitation platforms (sanplats) which are foundation slabs for clean, safe latrines. We just added the latest information from our partner to the project page. We hope to have a few more pictures, particularly of the sanplats, soon. We’ll let you know as soon as we do!

Thank You for helping us bring clean water and healthy living to this community!


The Water Project : kenya4372-43-clean-water-flowing


08/19/2015: Aliuba Spring Protection Project Underway

We are excited to report that, thanks to your willingness to help, the school and community near Aliuba Spring in Kenya will soon have a source of safe, clean water. The spring is being protected from contamination, and the community will receive training in sanitation and hygiene. We just posted a report from our partner in the field including information about the community, GPS coordinates, and pictures.

The construction on the spring is nearly finished. We’ll keep you posted as the project continues. Thank You for your help!


The Water Project : kenya4372-36-clean-water-flowing


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!