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The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Mercy And Field Officer Wilson Kipchoge
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Tabitha Sunguti At The Spring
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Tabitha Sunguti
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Mercy Anyango With Her Baby And Tabitha
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Backfilling
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Backfilling
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Backfilling
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Building The Foundation
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Building The Foundation
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Mixing Concrete
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Delivering Sand
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Getting Sand For Construction
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Getting Bricks For The Spring
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Getting Bricks For The Spring
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Getting Bricks For The Spring
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Spring Care Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  A Lady Washes Utensils Outside Her Home
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Bathroom
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Children Stand Near Dish Drying Rack
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Cleaning Dishes Outside
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Clothes Drying On The Ground
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Clothes Line And Clothes Drying On The Ground
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Dish Drying Rack
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Homestead With Clothesline
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Latrine And Improvized Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Latrine Floor
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Mrs Alice Family
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Sample Bathroom
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Fetching Water At The Spring
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Homestead
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Inside The Bathroom
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Latrine Floor State
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Sample Latrine
The Water Project: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring -  Inside The Bathroom

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 322 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Oct 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/06/2020

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



A group of field officers was moving around in Malava Constituency looking for viable springs for protection when they came across Timona Spring. The discharge of the spring was very impressive, serving approximately 322 people.

The current water source is contaminated because community members farm close to the spring. The community members say that they get recurrent cases of typhoid. The children in the community often complain of stomachache and are prone to diarrhea.

“Most people in our community complain about stomach aches and do not go for check-ups, whereby they do not know whether it is typhoid affecting them,” Mrs. Lilian Sunguti said.

Women like Mrs. Sunguti go to the river with a jug which they use to fill their 20-liter jerrycans and buckets. They scoop water from a pool made by the spring. The water is stored at home in the same containers which are used to fetch it.

The community tried to reach the local government to help them protect their spring but was only given false hope. They were a little bit skeptical about how genuine our organization is but after assuring them through examples of the springs we had protected before, they agreed to start sourcing for locally available materials immediately.

Being subsistence farmers, the community members wake up early to attend to their small farms. They use crops from their farms like vegetables, maize, and beans to feed their families.

The surplus is taken to the nearby shopping center for sale. Most people are poor and there is a high rate of primary school dropouts who lack school fees to go to high school.

Fewer than half of households in the community have latrines. Most of those that exist do not have a washable slab and some of the holes are so small that the children have a hard time using the facilities.

Most people dispose of their garbage in the kitchen gardens. Some throw nylon papers in the pit latrines.

They were very curious about the sanitation and hygiene training we provide and promised to spread the message far and wide so that everyone in the community will benefit from it.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed. Hand-washing will also be a big topic.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.


This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

Project Updates


05/29/2020: COVID-19 Prevention Training Update at Luvambo Community, Timona Spring

Our teams are working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Join us in our fight against the virus while maintaining access to clean, reliable water.

We are carrying out awareness and prevention trainings on the virus in every community we serve. Very often, our teams are the first (and only) to bring news and information of the virus to rural communities like Luvambo, Kenya.

We trained more than 19 people on the symptoms, transmission routes, and prevention of COVID-19. Before there were any reported cases in the area, we worked with trusted community leaders and the Water User Committee to gather community members for the training.

We covered essential hygiene lessons:

– Demonstrations on how to build a simple handwashing station

– Proper handwashing technique

– The importance of using soap and clean water for handwashing

– Cleaning and disinfecting commonly touched surfaces including at the water point.

We covered COVID-19-specific guidance in line with national and international standards:

– Information on the symptoms and transmission routes of COVID-19

– What social distancing is and how to practice it

– How to cough into an elbow

– Alternative ways to greet people without handshakes, fist bumps, etc.

– How to make and properly wear a facemask.

During training, we installed a new handwashing station with soap near the community’s water point, along with a sign with reminders of what we covered.

Due to the rampant spread of misinformation about COVID-19, we also dedicated time to a question and answer session to help debunk rumors about the disease and provide extra information where needed.

We continue to stay in touch with this community as the pandemic progresses. We want to ensure their water point remains functional and their community stays informed about the virus.

Water access, sanitation, and hygiene are at the crux of disease prevention. You can directly support our work on the frontlines of COVID-19 prevention in all of the communities we serve while maintaining their access to safe, clean, and reliable water.


The Water Project : covid19-kenya18135-an-installed-handwashing-station


10/16/2019: Giving Update: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring

A year ago, your generous donation helped Luvambo Community in Kenya access clean water.

There’s an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water at Timona Spring in Luvambo. Month after month, their giving supports ongoing sustainability programs that help this community maintain access to safe, reliable water. Read more…


The Water Project : 1-kenya18135-tabitha-sunguti-at-the-spring


10/18/2018: Luvambo Community Project Complete

Luvambo Community is celebrating their new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Timona Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

Spring Protection

Water is at the base of the economic growth pyramid. This statement couldn’t be truer for Luvambo Community.

When we visited the spring to check on construction, we used a route different than our normal one. As we approached Mrs. Eunice Mdogo’s homestead, we were welcomed with the sweet aroma of “African shortcake.” These are snacks similar to our famous ‘maandazi’ (a food similar to fried dough in the U.S.), but they are denser.

We followed the aroma like hound dogs and found two smoking, mud-walled kitchens filled with young men. They had large basins full of dough and a hot fireplace filled with lava-hot cooking oil. These young men make a living preparing shortcake.  They pack them in crates and supply them wholesale to the entire county, using their motorbikes.

They expressed to their delight and appreciation for protecting Timona Spring because it will keep their business stable throughout the year. They went further to inform us that all the water from the nearby hand-dug wells would dry up when the rain would subside. As a result, then they would have to travel a long distance to access clean water to use for making their dough. This clean water shortage used to waste their time and negatively affect their business.

With the newly protected spring, these young and industrious men will keep their business running throughout the year!

They are also happy to have plenty of clean drinking water, since they need to avoid dehydration in such a hot kitchen.

Construction Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, fencing poles and gravel. Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

Building the brick headwall

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

Working on the stairs

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

The concrete dried over the course of five days. With this spring now handed over to the community, we will continue to follow up with the water user committee to make sure everything runs smoothly.

“I’m truly witnessing a miracle. We have been having safe water shortage for decades. Most of the people invested in hand-dug wells that dry up due to the low water table,” said Gladys Tembo.

“We are now happy and settled in our minds knowing that water is the least of our problems.”

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

New Knowledge

Mrs. Lilian Akoth was very instrumental in passing our important message about hygiene and sanitation training to every household. She deliberately visited each homestead to inform them, as well as encourage and motivate them to attend.

Attendance was not as expected because many community members were preparing to hold a funeral. The Luhya tribe really values such events, and a few people feared to attend training lest rumors start about them having had something to do with this person’s death.

13 participants sat in the shade of mango trees, ready to learn new things.

We covered several topics including but not limited to leadership and governance (participants started a water and sanitation committee); operation and maintenance of the spring; healthcare; family planning; immunizations; the spread of disease and prevention. We also covered water treatment methods, personal care like handwashing, environmental hygiene, and hygiene promotion. These participants will become ambassadors of healthy living among their own families and their greater community.

When the facilitator was talking about handwashing, she asked participants if any of them had a place to wash their hands back home. One of them responded that she indeed owned one, which she had cleverly made for herself. We tasked her with the responsibility of demonstrating to the rest of the participants how to make one. She immediately regretted piping up since everyone was then looking to her to teach them, but our team stepped up and worked alongside her to demonstrate how to build a handwashing station.

Our brave volunteer explaining how she constructed a handwashing station for her family.

When everyone saw how easy it was to fix a container so that it works well for handwashing, they all promised to have one by our next visit.

“This training will help our entire community to lead healthier lives. We are very willing and able to disseminate all that we have learned because we now know that one person can compromise the health of the entire community,” Rhoda Makokha said.


The Water Project : 28-kenya18135-flowing-water


08/07/2018: Luvambo Community Project Underway

Dirty water from Timona Spring is making people in Luvambo Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : kenya18135-fetching-water-at-the-spring


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Giving Update: Luvambo Community, Timona Spring

October, 2019

A year ago, your generous donation helped Luvambo Community in Kenya access clean water – creating a life-changing moment for Tabitha Sunguti. Thank you!

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Luvambo Community, Timona Spring.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Luvambo Community, Timona Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

Stepping into the Luvambo community near Timona Spring, you are welcomed by a clean environment. The area is very green, in part due to the fields of sugarcane and maize blanketing the area. Sanitation in the area has improved as evidenced by the dishracks, clotheslines, and tippy taps for handwashing placed next to families’ pit latrines that we observed as we walked through the village and visited different households.

Ever since its protection last year, drawing water from Timona Spring for community members in Luvambo has been made easy as they need only place their containers under the discharge pipe and within no time the container is full Before the spring was protected, every time people went to fetch water from Timona Spring, they had to carry smaller container for filling the bigger one by scooping water from the open source. This was a time-consuming process that easily dirtied the water while collecting it.

Madam Mercy Anyango, a water user we interviewed at Timona Spring on our most recent visit, could not hide her joy about the project. Mercy explained how happy she was because she no longer has to wake up early in the morning just to go and collect water. Initially, water collected early in the morning was considered safest for drinking because it was less muddied and disturbed than later in the day. But now, safe water is drawn at one’s convenience without compromising its quality.

Madam Anyango with her baby and Field Officer Wilson Kipchoge at the spring

“Drawing water from this water source after implementation is very enjoyable to us and we are so happy because we no longer dirty [the] water in [the] process. More so, the waterborne diseases reported earlier and the tortoise which had invaded the spring together with frogs have been curbed through the construction of this spring. We are very thankful for…our spring for protection,” added Mercy.

12-year-old Tabitha Sunguti also shared her thoughts on how this project has impacted her life as a young girl often responsible for fetching water for her and her family’s needs.

“The spring has really helped us get access to safe, clean water. The firewood we fetch is now only for cooking, unlike before where a lot of firewood could be used in boiling water for drinking keeping in mind that firewood is currently a precious thing. Besides that, we do save time when fetching water from this water source which has enabled us [to] help our parents in other household chores.”

Tabitha smiles at the spring


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Luvambo Community, Timona Spring maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Luvambo Community, Timona Spring – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

St. Therese Foundation