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The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Fence The Community Built To Protect The Area Behind The Pipe
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Fence Protecting The Spring Box
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training Group Picture
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Water Point
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Water Drum At A Community Members Backyard
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  State Of Latrine Floors
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Scooping Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Sample Latrine
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Sample Houses In This Community
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Maize Plantation
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Hoisting Bucket Of Water Onto Head To Carry Home
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  Clothes And Mattress Dry Atop Home
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  An Improvised Dishrack
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  A Sample Kitchen In The Community
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  A Cloth Hangline
The Water Project: Ematetie Community, Chibusia Spring -  A Bathroom Made From Growing Bushes

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 140 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Nov 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 02/12/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Chibusia Spring is a permanent unprotected spring located in Kakamega County.

The community members of Ematetie Village wake up very early in the morning to prepare their children to go to school. Thereafter, the women clean the compound before joining their husbands to work on their farms. At around 3pm the women take the vegetables to sell at the main market in town.

Most community members keep dairy cattle and grow maize, groundnuts, bananas, and vegetables. In addition to farming, the men normally undertake sand harvesting and excavation of stones to earn their living.

Water

This spring serves more than 20 households who use the water for drinking, crop irrigation, and for other household chores.

The people draw water using small jugs and pour it into larger 10- or 20-liter jerrycans, then take it home.

The water source is open and the rate of contamination is high. For example, during rainfall, the overflow of water covers the spring and consequently makes the water dirty. It predisposes its users to waterborne diseases, such as typhoid, diarrhea, amoeba, and malaria.

“The situation in this community is very bad,” Mr. Benson Omwoma explained.

“Getting clean water for the community has been difficult. We are drinking the dirty water. As a result, we suffer from rampant cases of diarrhea and typhoid. ”

The community reached out for support following a baseline survey at a neighboring school and having heard about the good work we are doing among marginalized communities. A visit to the spring showed that it was in need of protection.

Protecting the spring will help empower the female members of the community by creating more time for them to engage and invest in income-generating activities. In addition, protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure.

“This is a God-given opportunity and the idea of protecting the Chibusia Spring will solve our water problems,” one of the residents confided to the field officers.

Sanitation

Fewer than half of all households have latrines. Most of the latrines that do exist are covered by banana leaves and old iron sheets.

A good sign is the fact that most of the people throw their garbage in the farms so that they can use as manure. The sanitation facilities and health promotion campaign, through training, will enable, enlighten and build the capacity of the community to take matters related to community health as a priority.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed. Handwashing will also be a big topic.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Project Updates


11/28/2018: Ematetie Community Project Complete

Ematetie Community is celebrating their new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Chibusia Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

New Knowledge

Mr. Benson Omwoma was our main contact who helped us plan work in Ematetie. He coordinated volunteers to transport local sand and stones to the construction site. He also helped us recruit participants for our hygiene and sanitation training. He told us that it was tough recruiting enough of his neighbors, because most of them responded about how busy they are on their farms. Thankfully, Mr. Omwoma convinced nine of his neighbors to come and represent their own households. These 10 participants have promised to share everything they have learned with their families and the others who were not able to attend.

Group picture with all of the participants

Several topics were covered during the training, such as personal and environmental hygiene, common local diseases and their prevention, and care of the water point. The ten steps of handwashing were demonstrated, and participants were shown how to make their own handwashing stations using five-liter plastic containers.

Participants were surprised to learn that there are ways they need to care for their new spring protection. If they enforce special rules for its use and carry out some weekly chores, the spring protection will serve generations to come. They formed a water committee that will manage and maintain the water point. Learning about ways to care for the protected spring actually made the community more excited about having one nearby in Ematetie.

People were also surprised to learn about how important it is to treat drinking water. They admitted that they never boiled the water from Chibusia Spring because firewood is expensive and the entire process took too much energy. They loved learning about how solar energy can kill germs instead; all they would need is a clear container, time, and sunlight.

“The training will change our lives because we will form a group that will be registered under the name of ‘Chibisia Spring,’ and this group will help us do many activities which will earn income,” said Mrs. Nancy Vugudza.

“We will put in practice what we have learned today. Thank you so much for giving us hope again of accessing clean and safe water.”

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

Spring Protection

Construction at Chibusia Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

“I am personally so happy because we have clean and sufficient water,” said Mr. Mohammed Kweyu. “This community has gotten something precious which they have desired to have for years.”

The only challenge during the process was the location of the spring. It’s at the bottom of a steep hill, so it was difficult to safely shuttle stones and sand down to the construction site. That being the case, the community greatly appreciates the cement stairs that now lead down to the discharge pipe.

The Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, and gravel. Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

The concrete dried over the course of five days. With this spring now handed over to the community, we will continue to follow up with the water user committee to make sure everything runs smoothly. They have already fenced in the spring area and plan to plant grass to prevent erosion.

The community held a meeting to mark the completion and commissioning of the protected spring. The event was full of prayer and thanksgiving. The community leaders thanked God and were categorical that the protected spring will greatly improve the quality of life here.


The Water Project : 17-kenya18155-flowing-water


11/07/2018: Ematetie Community Project Underway

Dirty water from Chibusia Spring is making people in Ematetie Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : kenya18155-scooping-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!



Contributors

Imago Dei Community