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The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Evelyne Nyangai By Her New Sanplat
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Finished Sanplat
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Casting The Sanplat
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Preparing The Pit For New Latrine
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Spring Protection
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Spring Protection
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Mixing Cement
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Spring Excavation
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  People Delivering Bricks To The Artisan
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  People Delivering Bricks To The Artisan
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Trainer Emma
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Protus Training On Spring Care
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Trainer Jacky
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Teaching Illustrations
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Presentation
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Group Discussions
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Group Discussions
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Trainer Betty
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Training Participants
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Training
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Julius Shamalla
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Mud Latrine
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Violet Ayuma
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  In The Quarry
The Water Project: Bukhanga Community -  Working On The Farm

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 140 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Dec 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/09/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Bukhanga Village is located between the Kabras and Shinyalu area. It is quite rural, surrounded by three churches and the community is peaceful. It has a rocky landscape, wherein we find young men working in quarries to harvest rocks for sale. The buildings are semipermanent structures, some with iron roofs and others with grass-thatched roofs.

People living in Bukhanga Village drink water from Indangasi Spring. This spring pools up to the surface and is completely open to contamination. Activities like washing, cleaning and even bathing are done right around the spring. Animals graze here, too. Untreated waterborne diseases like typhoid are a leading cause of death due to drinking from this source.

Villagers spend a lot of their time drawing water and miss out on other more productive activities. The diseases they get are very expensive to treat. Feeling sick is a part of daily life for people here.

“We are sick all the time and our children are the most affected since they are not keen on drinking clean water,” said Violet Ayuma.

As a result, they rarely go for treatment – a habit that can turn deadly if it is a more serious infection.

It was cold and rainy during our first visit, making it hard to navigate the dirt paths that quickly changed to mud. We visited several community members at their homesteads to learn about what living in Bukhanga is like.

The most common livelihood is sugarcane farming since farmers are able to sell their sugarcane to a local sugar factory. Harvesting stone is also popular among the men, with some younger boys even dropping out of school to help get extra stones for sale. Other men find that saving up for a motorbike to taxi people around, called ‘boda boda,’ is an easy way to make money.

People wake up early at 6am to go fetch water that will be used for drinking, washing and watering the dairy animals. The morning tea is mostly prepared at night so that people can drink it quickly in the morning. The children prepare for school as the adults go to the farm. They come back at around midday and prepare lunch and after lunch they either shower and nap, and those who need firewood for cooking dinner look for it. Bedtime is always around 8pm when the sun sets since there isn’t any electricity here.

Other facilities are lacking, for at least 30% of households don’t have a pit latrine for using the bathroom. These are made of mud and are practically unusable during rainy weather. Hands are not washed after using the bathroom because people prefer to limit their trips to the spring.

“If you construct latrines here without cement, they collapse. We can’t afford cement, and there is a huge risk, especially to children,” shared local pastor Julius Shamalla.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Indangasi Spring has been in existence since the 1950’s, and it has served many people from generation to generation. With the current climate changes and human activities around the spring, it will be good to protect the spring so that it can continue serving the community members into the future. Construction will protect it from contamination so that it becomes a safer water source for everyone.

Sanitation Platforms

Community members will vote on five families who would benefit most from cement latrine floors. As the artisans construct these, the rest of the community will be trained on ways they can make their own latrines safer.

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed. Handwashing will also be a big topic.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Project Updates


12/21/2018: Bukhanga Community Project Complete

Bukhanga Community is celebrating their new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Indangasi Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

New Training

Hygiene and sanitation training was done in consultation with a community leader, the pastor at Love and Truth Church. Some 90% of the church attendees use Indangasi Spring, so it was a good place to hold sessions. The pastor made an announcement in the church and called us and put us on speaker phone for us to hear the community members welcoming the project and inviting us to come and conduct the training.

The weather was sunny and hot, though there were indications from the clouds that it would rain later in the day. That didn’t matter, though, since training took place inside the church building.

The training was very interactive. Mrs. Ingangasi, an older woman than most, was conversant in the local dialect and a little Swahili. She was one of the most eager to learn. Those in leadership like the pastor and Mr. Stephen, the village elder, were very active too.

Several topics were covered during the training, such as personal and environmental hygiene, common local diseases and their prevention, and care of the water point. The ten steps of handwashing were demonstrated, along with demonstrations for dental hygiene and water treatment.

Handwashing demonstration out by the spring.

Environmental hygiene information was especially important for this community. The community members were encouraged to dig garbage pits since none had any; they were throwing rubbish on their farms, and they were not recycling plastics.

Some people didn’t have latrines to use and were instead going in the bushes outside. Mrs. Violet said that her neighbors were doing open defecation and that they had been talked to – but they were not heeding any of their neighbors’ concerns. Since the village elder was there, he promised to take up the challenge of getting all of his community to construct latrines.

Participants have joined a water committee that will oversee the spring protection and ensure that it’s cared for.

Trainer Protus teaching about how the spring protection works.

“I have treated typhoid forever and it has never left me. I thought I was observing hygiene but with the training, I know that I will be able to keep typhoid and amoeba away,” said Mr. James Kutoto.

“Thank you for the training. I have acquired more knowledge about water pollution.”

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

A sanitation platform drying at the back of a family’s homestead.

Spring Protection

Construction at Indangasi Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

The community members gathered around Indangasi Spring to offer prayers of thanksgiving. The community was especially grateful about how easy it is to access the water. They promised to maintain the spring so that it can serve them for many more years. They said they are the envy of their neighbors because Indangasi Spring is the first one to be protected in the area.

“Out of persistance, this spring has been protected. My friends are on my case because they want their springs protected too! It’s beautiful and safe,” said Mr. Julius Shiamala.

The Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, and gravel. Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

Community members shuttling bricks to the artisan at the spring protection site.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

The concrete dried over the course of five days. With this spring now handed over to the community, we will continue to follow up with the water committee to make sure everything runs smoothly. They have already fenced in the spring area and planted grass to prevent erosion.


The Water Project : 24-kenya18312-flowing-water


11/28/2018: Bukhanga Community Project Underway

Dirty water from Indangasi Spring is making people in Bukhanga Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 5-kenya18312-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

Portola Panda Water Fund
3 individual donor(s)