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The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  The Community Built Stairs Into The Hill
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Foundation Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Foundation Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Excavation
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Carrying Bricks To The Site
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Community Member Brining Bricks
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Spring Care Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Trainer Protus
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Trainer Jacky
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Where Food Is Cooked
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Garbage At The Edge Of The Property
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Inside The Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Place To Bathe
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Mud Latrine
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Patrick Nyanje
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Jacklie Okhaso At Her Home
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Water Storage In Kitchen
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Jackline Carrying Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Jackline Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring -  Working On A Farm

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 350 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 10/11/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



The leading cause of death in Mungakha is water-related disease. Adults have a better chance at pulling through when stricken with typhoid or cholera, but children under age five are at a high risk of fatality since their parents cannot afford treatment.

This is because dirty water is used for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. Nyanje Spring is an open water source that is subjected to all sorts of contamination. Community members have tried to make the water-fetching process easier by placing an iron sheet that funnels water into their containers.

“I wish we could just have safe drinking water,” said Jackline Okhaso.

“Treating it has always been a challenge for me. Typhoid has stuck in my body and I can’t afford medication.”

Mungakha Village is in a rural area dotted with mud houses. It is quiet as people go about their daily chores and farming. The place is very green and lush, and we noticed many people planting and weeding during our first visit.

The most common crop was sugarcane, but the nearest sugar millers, Mumias Sugar Factory, has gone under. That has forced most of the Mungakha farmers to plant either maize or beans. Women keep vegetable gardens outside their homes, which they harvest mainly to feed the family. There are some other jobs besides farming; Patrick Nyanje is a driver for a local member of parliament, while others work in factories.

People wake up at 6am to prepare their children for school. Most have prepared the morning tea in the evening before going to bed. They clean the compound, tend to the animals, and head to the farm to work up to midday. After eating something they can rest for a few minutes before going to fetch firewood and vegetables to prepare dinner. They have dinner from around 8pm and sleep thereafter.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Nyanje Spring is located at the bottom of a slope, which allows a lot of dirt into the water. During the rainy season, human activity, animal activity, and fertilizers from the farms nearby are deposited into the spring, making the water unsafe for human consumption. The area around the spring is slippery and it needs good stairs for safe access.

A spring protection will address all of this. Construction will protect the source from contamination. Community members will be able to descend cement stairs and place their container under a discharge to easily fetch good water.

Sanitation Platforms

There are many households without a latrine. Those that have latrines make them out of mud, which is very hard to clean.

“Our mud floors are always slippery, and during the rainy season we prefer to use the bushes,” said Patrick Nyanje.

Community members will vote on five families who are in the greatest need of new cement latrine floors. As the artisans construct these, the rest of the community will be trained on ways they can make their own latrines safer.

Training

Most of the community members have clotheslines, although they spread their bedding on the ground. Open defecation is evident, as many latrines here have collapsed. Nobody has a place dug for their garbage, and they just throw their waste in their farms. Handwashing facilities are lacking, so we need to train people on handwashing and its importance.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population low.

Project Updates


01/28/2019: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring Project Complete

Mungakha Community is celebrating their new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Nyanje Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

New Knowledge

We communicated with Mr. Okhaso, who had already shown so much leadership in rallying his neighbors to help our artisan construct the spring protection. He helped us invite community members to attend hygiene and sanitation training. Anyone who draws water from Nyanje Spring was invited.

Training was held under a shade tree near the spring, which fit our total number of 26 participants. Most of the people were women, who are traditionally seen as most responsible for water-related and sanitation-related chores around the household.

The participants were actively involved and the training was so interactive that the community members almost talked more than our trainers.

Several topics were covered during the training, such as personal and environmental hygiene; common local diseases and their prevention; care of the water point. The ten steps of handwashing were demonstrated, along with demonstrations for dental hygiene and water treatment.

Handwashing training

The training has helped community members understand the dangers of open defecation and also understand the importance of handling water carefully. For example, they had been using leaves to stuff in their container openings to avoid water spillage. They had also been storing drinking water for too long.

Water user committee members were voted on and then later trained on spring care, management, and other factors to make this water project sustainable. Mr. Patrick Okhaso, our contact person for this project, was elected as on of the leaders of this committee.

“After forming this water user community management committee, we will ensure we come up with an idea to invest into something that will help us earn some income from the spring. We will also have to be meeting so as to ensure we have unity through this spring protection,” said Mr. Okhaso.

“The training we have received is sufficient enough to make us venture into something that will boost us.”

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

Spring Protection

Construction at Nyanje Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

There were minimal challenges during the during this project. The only short delay was that the sand and stones the community had gathered for the artisan ended up not being enough, so people went back out to find more.

“This water is going to help us reduce the distance that we have been walking looking for clean water. Many people are going to use this water because it serves so many during dry season specifically,” said Mr. Okhaso.

“This will help us come together and work as a team here.”

The Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials (e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, and gravel). Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

Women carrying bricks from the top of the hill down to where the artisan is working.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

The concrete dried over the course of five days. With this spring now handed over to the community, we will continue to follow up with the water committee to make sure everything runs smoothly. They have already fenced in the spring area and planted grass to prevent erosion.

We will be making follow-up visits as we carry out The Water Promise, with the intention of ensuring that the project is sustainable and that the community has changed – not just the clean water and hygiene, but that their quality of life has changed for the better.


The Water Project : 23-kenya18313-flowing-water


01/02/2019: Mungakha Community, Nyanje Spring Project Underway

Dirty water from Nyanje Spring is making people in Mungakha Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 3-kenya18313-jackline-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

2 individual donor(s)