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The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  People Helping With Construction
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Delivering Stones To The Artisan
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Trainer Paul
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Responding To Questions
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Trainer Betty
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Clothes Drying
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Latrine
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Garbage Disposal Site
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Community Members
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Josephine Asena
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Josephine Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring -  Rose Amabani Working On Her Farm

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 280 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/09/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



In Mungakha Community, dirty water is used for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. Asena Spring, where the 280 people in this community collect water, is an open water source that is subjected to all sorts of contamination.

After drinking this water, it’s common for someone to fall ill. Unfortunately, most people don’t have the resources to afford the treatment they need to recover safely and quickly. Community members tried to alleviate the problem and fixed a plastic pipe to help them draw water into their containers. But that has not been enough.

“This water has continued being bad for us because nowadays everybody has typhoid and amoeba infection because of using the water here,” said Mrs. Josephine Asena.

To make matters worse, the area around the spring is rocky, and people have to be very careful when they draw water to avoid falling.

Mungakha Village is in a rural area dotted with mud houses. It is quiet as people go about their daily chores and farming. The place is very green and lush, and we noticed many people planting and weeding during our first visit.

It’s a unique area because the village elder, Mr. Asena, has a large family that owns a lot of land. They’ve built separate mud homes for grandparents, aunts and uncles, and other family members. They have a huge farm that they work on together.

The most common crop was sugarcane, but the nearest sugar millers, Mumias Sugar Factory, has gone under. That has forced most of the Mungakha farmers to plant either maize or beans. Women keep vegetable gardens outside their homes, which they harvest mainly to feed the family. There are some other jobs besides farming; young men drive motorbikes around to taxi customers, but they’re renting these motorbikes and thus the income is very low.

Mrs. Josephine Asena told us that she wakes up at 6am every morning to prepare breakfast. She is 60 years old and aged, so she does not have children to prepare for school. She then sweeps her compound and departs to her farm. She comes back around midday to get lunch. She rests a bit and starts to gather the things she needs for supper, like vegetables and flour from the posho mill. She also looks for firewood when she runs out. She prepares dinner at 8pm and sleeps around 10pm. This is similar to all community members apart from a few changes for the homes that have school-going children.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Asena Spring is located at the bottom of a slope, which allows a lot of dirt into the water. During the rainy season, human activity, animal activity, and fertilizers from the farms nearby are deposited into the spring, making the water unsafe for human consumption. The area around the spring is slippery and it needs good stairs for safe access.

A spring protection will address all of this. Construction will protect the source from contamination. Community members will be able to descend cement stairs and place their container under a discharge to easily fetch good water.

Sanitation Platforms

Most households have a pit latrine. However, these latrines are made out of mud, which is very hard to clean. The mud gets slippery and dangerous when it rains, so people often prefer going in the bushes.

Community members will vote on five families who are in the greatest need of new cement latrine floors. As the artisans construct these, the rest of the community will be trained on ways they can make their own latrines safer.

Training

Most of the community members have clotheslines, dish racks, and latrines. However, they don’t observe handwashing as important. They store their water but they don’t clean the containers.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population low.

Project Updates


01/21/2019: Mungakha Community, Asena Spring Project Complete

Mungakha Community is celebrating their new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Asena Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

New Knowledge

After completion of the spring protection, we communicated with our contact person and identified the day and time for hygiene and sanitation training sessions. Attendance was great and everyone was eager to learn. Since the training took place during school holidays we even had children at the training, giving us a total number of 24 participants.

It was a sunny day so the training was conducted just near Asena Spring under a tree with nice shade, with a good breeze and quiet surroundings. All the participants were very interested in training, asking questions and also answering questions whenever they were asked.

Several topics were covered during the training, such as personal and environmental hygiene; common local diseases and their prevention; care of the water point. The ten steps of handwashing were demonstrated, along with demonstrations for dental hygiene and water treatment.

”We have been taking water without precautions, but through this training, it will help us improve on our sanitation and hygiene. Also, you have helped us through training on what we can do to improve on our living,” said Philip.

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

Spring Protection

Construction at Asena Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

”Before the protection of this spring, I was wondering now ‘how can it be protected?’ until when I came here after it was complete and I realized that truly God gave people the knowledge to make things a reality which seems to be impossible,” said Mrs. Josephine Bulima.

“I am very happy that out of impossibility the reality is here with us and now we drink safe and clean water.”

The Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, and gravel. Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

Children who volunteered to help the artisan during school vacation.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

The concrete dried over the course of five days. With this spring now handed over to the community, we will continue to follow up with the water committee to make sure everything runs smoothly.

Community members who attended training have already taken the initiative to plant grass around the area and build a fence around the water point. People are filling their containers easily and quickly. They are positive that this spring protection coupled with their knowledge of water treatment will keep them from typhoid, cholera, and other issues they dealt with on a regular basis. Clean, accessible water will ensure good health, energy, and time spent on education, economic activities, and family.


The Water Project : 20-kenya18314-flowing-water


12/18/2018: Mungakha Community Project Underway

Dirty water from Asena Spring is making people in Mungakha Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 5-kenya18314-carrying-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

St Peter's United Church of Christ