Loading images...
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Community Members
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Excavation Begins To Divert The Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Laying The Springs Foundation
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Mixing Concrete
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Brick Setting
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Community Members Help Lay Bricks
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Wall Construction
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Rub Wall Construction
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Staircase Construction
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Plaster Works
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Pipe Measurements
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Tile Setting
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Children Bring Materials To Site
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Backfilling With Stones
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Backfilling Continues With Help From Community Members
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Backfilling With Plastic Tarp And Dirt
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Soil Backfilling
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Grass Planting
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Fence Construction
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Spring Cleaning
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Sanitation Platform Construction
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Site Management Training
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Understanding The Construction Process
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Taking Notes Fetching Water Demonstration
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Training Continues
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Participants
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Handwashing Demonstration
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Community Member Leads A Discussion
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Training Complete
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Thank You Ericks Hope
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Thumbs Up For Clean Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Thank You Ericks Hope
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Thank You Ericks Hope
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  A Wave From The Little Ones
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Fetching Clean Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Celebrating The New Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Mounting Clean Water To Go Home
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Ready To Walk Home
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Kids At The Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Enjoying The Spring Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Happy Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Smiles And Waves From The Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Clean Water From Shihungu Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Shihungu Spring Site
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Happy Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  A Few Drops Escape
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Happy With Fresh Spring Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Hello From Shihungu Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  An Overgrown Latrine
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Showing Us The Family Latrine
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Clothes Drying
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Storage In Home
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Washing Clothes By The Spring
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Community Animals
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Backyard
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Mr And Mrs Shihungu
The Water Project: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring -  Lubao Market By Community

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 200 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Oct 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



It takes about 40 minutes to get to Shihungu Community from our Kakamega County office. The journey isn’t bad because the roads on the way are in good condition. It was hot and sunny when we arrived in Shihungu, which is a quickly developing rural area.

Some 200 people living here do not have clean water. Their water source is an open spring that pools to the surface just off the main road leading into the community. To make it easier to fetch water, community members fixed a pipe so that water will funnel right into their containers.

There’s lots of water here, but it’s dirty. It’s also a very bushy spot that only allows two people to stand by the spring at a time. All of the time it takes to fetch water severely limits people’s other important educational and economic endeavors.

And without access to clean water, this vulnerable population is exposed to deadly waterborne illnesses.

“It is difficult to have a thriving economy when fresh water is not easily accessible for domestic use, farming, and individual use. A lack of fresh water also affects workers’ productivity by causing illnesses where people will use a lot of money visiting hospitals – which affects them economically,” said Mr. George Nyongesa.

Community members need good health to provide for their families. Most are farmers who specialize in maize and sugarcane. Many young adults have invested in motorbikes that they use for taxi businesses.

This community neighbors Shikusa GK Prison, where inmates farm the crops that are sent to all the other prisons in Kenya. It is by St. Anne’s Academy, which produces the best primary students in Kenya. It is also right by Lubao Market, which is known for selling dogs and cats. If anybody is in need of a pet dog or cat, they will go there.

What we can do:

Training

“The matter of having toilets is crucial to creating a strong economy as well as improving health, and protecting people’s safety and dignity, particularly for women and girls,” said Mrs. Sarah Shihungu.

“We need to be educated on the importance of sanitation and hygiene because we do not know much of why we should have toilets and bathrooms, so your presence and help in our community will be of great achievement in our community.”

Only one Shihungu household has a place to wash hands by their bathroom. According to the majority, hands should only be washed before and after eating.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed. Handwashing will also be a big topic.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

Fewer than 10% of families using Shihungu Spring have a private place to use the bathroom. The few latrines we saw are in poor condition.

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new concrete latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Project Updates


10/31/2019: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring Project Complete!

Shihungu Community now has access to clean water! Shihungu Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. We protected the spring, provided 5 sanitation platforms to different households in the community, and we trained the community on improved sanitation and hygiene practices.

(To hear them give thanks, check out the video on the Photos tab of this project page!)

Team Leader Catherine Chepkemoi (center) with Shihungu community members

Shihungu Spring being the only source of water for this community, the participants were so happy for the newly protected spring that will help to provide clean and safe drinking water. According to people here, Shihungu Spring is a natural source of water that is second to none, even bottled water.

They believe that bottled water is not safe for consumption because no one knows the source. As for Shihungu Spring, the source is natural and they have been using it since they were young. The community members encouraged even our staff members to pass by when they go to the field and fetch the spring’s water to drink.

Spring Protection

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, including bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, stones, and fencing poles. Accommodations and meals were provided for the artisan, too.

The Process

Women and men lent their strength to the artisan to help him with manual labor.

At first, when the construction began, the artisan had a hard time controlling the community members who came to fetch water at the spring. They came in large numbers every day to fetch water. We had to ask them to fetch water very early in the morning before the construction began each day so that the artisan could work well without being disturbed. After this, the compromise in water fetching and construction went well.

The spring area was excavated to create space for setting the foundation of thick plastic tarp, wire mesh, and concrete. After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

Community members help lay bricks

As the wing walls and headwall were curing, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

Plastering the wing walls

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a thick plastic tarp to prevent potential sources of contamination. There was a slight delay during this step because the stones that had been provided were not enough.

Children help deliver stones for backfilling

It took 2 more days for the community members to look for more stones, which delayed the backfilling just a bit. Once the backfilling was complete, it took about 2 weeks of patience for the concrete to dry.

Community members help backfill with stones and soil

As soon as it was ready, people got the okay from our field officers to begin fetching clean water. We met them there to celebrate this momentous occasion.

“I am so happy that Shihungu Spring has finally been protected after a long time,” said 35-year-old farmer Mr. Simon Makutsi.

“We can now fetch water from a clean place. No [more] poor drainage which directed dirty water to the spring because [you] have made us understand why the cut of drainage is needed at the spring. Our water is natural and we thank [you] for helping us access clean water. No more worries of waterborne diseases. Be blessed!”

Sanitation Platforms

All 5 sanitation platforms have been installed. These 5 families are happy about this milestone of having a private latrine of their own and are optimistic that people will no longer leave waste outdoors. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

Sanitation platform construction with help from its new owners

New Knowledge

Together Mr. Anthony Imbayi Shihungu, a respected local leader, and village elder Mr. Francis Matwanga were tasked with organizing the training. Mr. Matwanga gave us the community’s preferred date for training, for he was very much aware of the community calendar when it comes to planting season and other big events.

21 people attended training. The attendance was so impressive and to our expectations. The village elder who is also a government representative at the village level really mobilized the community very well to attend the training, so the community was well represented at the training.

The participants chose the venue near the spring where the training was to take place, but later we changed the venue because there was no shade and the day was sunny and hot. This forced us to look for another venue outside Mr. Shihungu’s homestead where the participants sat comfortably under the shade. This enabled them to be keen and attentive to the training session.

Training participants; facilitator stands in center

We covered several topics including leadership and governance; operation and maintenance of the spring; healthcare; family planning; immunizations; and the prevention and spread of disease. We also covered water treatment methods, personal care like handwashing, environmental hygiene, hygiene promotion, and many other things.

There were no challenges during the training except a small disruption which was caused by a hawk which wrestled with the chicken and got away with its chick! This made most of the participants leave the training session shouting and throwing stones at hawk which had already taken away the chick from her mother.

Mr. Simon Makutsi, one of the participants, was so sad and was forced to take the chicken and her chicks to a safe place to avoid any other interruptions again during the training. After that, all ran smoothly.

Site management training at the spring, still under construction

During the onsite training at the spring, the participants were being shown how well the spring can be taken care of by the community without damaging it. The way the spring will be maintained determines how long it will serve the community. The participants promised to ensure that the spring will be fenced, cut off drainage will be well-placed, and cleanliness will be the order of the day.

The village elder promised to take action at whoever will go against the rules and regulations that govern the spring. Every household will be responsible if their children damage the spring. He promised that whoever will go against the spring will pay some fine to repair and maintain it.

When the participants were asked why we required them to contribute the locally available materials and help the artisan during the construction process, some people still were not so sure of the reasoning. We discussed how it is important to give as a community because working together as a team promotes a spirit of teamwork and togetherness.

Not only that, but it promotes ownership and when the community owns the spring, they will maintain it very well. Then, in case of any challenge, they will feel comfortable contacting our team for help. This session was very special as everyone got on the same page of understanding and reciprocity.

Training complete!

The community members adopted all concepts from the training so well because they had a public health officer who was following up on sanitation and hygiene in the community even before the project began. Having the training was the best thing that helped them to understand that embracing good sanitation and hygiene and supporting household water treatment and safe storage initiatives to improve the quality of drinking water and reduce the transmission of waterborne diseases will improve their way of living in a positive way.

Happy to be taking fresh spring water home

“The training will change our lives and those of our future generations because we have learned a lot about sanitation and hygiene,” said village elder Mr.Matwanga.

“Without proper sanitation and hygiene, I have learned that we will always be sick but now we know how [to] store our drinking water, water treatment, handwashing, environmental and personal hygiene. We will ensure that we improve and change the way we have been doing things before we attended the training today.”

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 29-kenya19113-thank-you-ericks-hope


10/09/2019: Shihungu Community, Shihungu Spring Project Underway!

Dirty water from Shihungu Spring is making people in Shihungu Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with news of success!


The Water Project : 8-kenya19113-fetching-water


Project Videos


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

Erick's Hope Inc.