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The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Walking Home With Water Container
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Standing At The Spring
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Standing At Home
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Mutuli Spring
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Maize
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Leonard Bwire
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Latrine
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Homestead
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Firewood
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Firewood In Kitchen
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Father And His Child
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Farm
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Eunice Naliaka
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Elliot Omunanga
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Cooking Area
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Container Fills With Water
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Clothes Laying Out Dry
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Children
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  At The Spring
The Water Project: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring -  At Home

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 238 Served

Project Phase:  Under Construction
Estimated Install Date (?):  03/13/2020

Project Features


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When we were conducting a hygiene and sanitation training for people living near Thomas Spring a young man informed us about a high yielding spring that needed protection. After the training, we carried him on our motorcycle and he directed us to the spring.

Mutuli Spring was impressive to see in person. Our teams agreed that it has a very high yield. It was obvious why the 238 people who live near the spring rely on it to meet their daily water needs. And that is why it is a great candidate for protection.

The community members have installed a pipe at the spring to help dispense the water easily. The low lying plastic pipe is held in place by stones. It sometimes gets carried away by runoff and the community members are forced to scoop water using jugs until a volunteer gets another plastic pipe to fix at the spring.

While the pipe makes it easier to fetch water, the water itself is unsafe for drinking. The community members do not treat the water from the spring. Most of them say that boiling is a waste of time and fuel while others do not like the smell and taste of chlorine. The community members prefer spring water to rainwater because they say its sweeter.

Community members complained about diarrhea and stomachache mostly during the rainy season. Those problems are caused by bacteria and other contaminants in the water.

“My children get very sick often. They end up missing school and my wife has to spend a lot of productive time in the hospital with my children,” said Leonard Bwire, a farmer who lives near the spring.

Musiachi is a typical rural area where one has to walk for more than a kilometer to find a shop. The area is very green and highly vegetated with indigenous trees, grass and various farm plantations. The majority of the buildings are mud-walled and roofed with iron sheets.

This is a rural area where individuals engage in subsistence farming to meet their basic needs. Sometimes back, the people engaged in commercial sugarcane farming but shifted to maize due to the collapse of the sugarcane industry which led to a drop in the price of sugarcane.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will help provide access to cleaner and safer water. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a task carried by women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by freeing up more of their time and energy.

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least 2 days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance.

The facilitator plans to use Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST), Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it is consumed. We will also emphasize the importance of handwashing.

Training will result in the formation of a committee that will oversee the operations and maintenance of the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage channels. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select 5 families that should benefit from new concrete latrine floors. Training will inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, including bricks, clean sand, and gravel. The 5 families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Project Updates


02/11/2020: Musiachi Community, Mutuli Spring Project Underway!

Dirty water from Mutuli Spring is making people in Musiachi sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with news of success!


The Water Project : kenya19129-eunice-naliaka


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

SJR
Truck Pool Charity
2 individual donor(s)