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The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Training Complete
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Children Enjoying Delicious Termites After Training
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Training At The Spring Site
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Discussion Around New Dishrack
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  How To Build A Dishrack Activity
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Handwashing Practice
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Washing Hands Using The Leaky Tin
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Handwashing Practice
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Demonstrating The Leaky Tin
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Field Officer Jacklyne Chelagat In Action
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Training In Progress
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Leaky Tin Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Demonstration On Grass Planting
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Demonstration On Fencing
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Demonstration On Cleaning The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Site Management Training On Fencing
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Artisan And Laborers Re Energizing After Work
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  New Owners Of A Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Hooray For Spring Protection
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Thumbs Up For Clean Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Kids At The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Smiles At Kenya Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  All Filled Up And Ready To Go
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Thumbs Up At Kenya Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Happy Filling Up
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Thumbs Up For Kenya Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Children At The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Cheering Women At The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Thumbs Up For Clean Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Smiles For Clear Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Thumbs Up For Running Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Kenya Spring Complete
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Slab Setting
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Sanitation Platform Construction
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Community Members Carrying Stones To The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Backfilling With Stones
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Children Carry Stones To The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Opening The Drainage Channel
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Grass Planting
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Women Helping Out At The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Site Clearance After Construction
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Adding In The Plastic Tarp
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Clearing The Area Digging Cut Off Drainage
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Pipe Setting
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Finishing The Rub Wall
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Adding The Discharge Pipe
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Working On The Stairs
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Artisans Enjoying Work
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Kids Look On At Wall Construction
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Brick By Brick
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Foundation Laying
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Bricklaying Begins
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Large Community Turn Out To Help
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Community Fences Off The Area
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Looking Out From The Eye
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Finding The Springs Eye
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Okanga Family Latrine
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Meeting With Community About Project
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Agness Using Spring Water To Wash Dishes
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Water From Spring Is Used On Farms
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Carrying Water Home
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Josephine Lijodi
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Woman By The Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Animals Drink From Spring
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Field Officer Jacky Interviewing
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Community Members
The Water Project: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring -  Bridge Into Community

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 420 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Sep 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



“It is said that love prevails over anything bad. I got married in this community some 20 years ago and when I was sent by my mother-in-law to fetch water, I was shocked and felt so sick to see the water source. I almost ran away but due to the love for my husband, I persevered,” shared Mrs. Khamasi.

“In truth, we have suffered in terms of getting dirty and unsafe water from the spring for quite a long time.”

Some 420 people in Mutao use the water from Kenya Spring for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and bathing. It is saddening to see the kind of dirty water that people are consuming every day.

Especially when thinking of the children, whose immunity is not strong enough to fight many of the germs found in this dirty water. The spring is found deep in a valley, where the hills allow rainwater to carry even more contaminants into the water.

The community reports that for as long as they can remember, they have been dealing with water-related diseases such as typhoid and diarrhea. They have been using a lot of resources to treat these illnesses.

An average day begins at 5:30am in the morning and ends at 8pm in the evening. In the morning, women wake up to prepare their children for school. After the children leave, women are responsible for house chores before they join husbands on the farm. Most people in this community depend on the farming of sugarcane plantations. They plant maize, beans, and plantains at the household level.

This region is known for bullfighting, where local cows are trained and brought together to fight. Local alcohol is brewed and consumed at high levels. The brew is referred to as “malwa.”

The majority of people survive on less than a dollar per day. Most of the young people are unemployed, and it’s out of this frustration that they turn to excessive malwa consumption. The living standards in Mutao Village are low, and life expectancy is also low.

What we can do:

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed. Handwashing will also be a big topic.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new concrete latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Project Updates


09/27/2019: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring Project Completed!

Mutao Community now has access to clean water! Kenya Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of water thanks to your donation. We protected the spring, provided 5 sanitation platforms to different households in the community, and we trained the community on improved sanitation and hygiene practices.

Women celebrate at the spring

Spring Protection

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, including bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, stones, and fencing poles. Accommodations and meals were provided for the artisan, too. The artisan enjoyed a lot of support from the community here, with women, children, and men ferrying materials to the site and all helping with the manual labor too.

Children carry stones to the spring’s construction site

The Process

The spring area was excavated to create space for setting the foundation of thick plastic tarp, wire mesh, and concrete. After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

Community members of all ages came to help with construction

As the wing walls and headwall were curing, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This protects the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

Artisans enjoying their work

The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a thick plastic tarp to prevent potential sources of contamination. Though we ran out of stones during the initial stages of this process, when the community could not mobilize anymore from the surrounding landscape the local representative from their county assembly came in and donated the rest of the needed gravel and stones. There were no other challenges during construction after that. It took about 2 weeks of patience for the concrete to dry.

Artisan measures the discharge pipe’s height

Working together to backfill the spring with stones

As soon as it was ready, people got the okay from our field officers to begin fetching clean water. We met them there to celebrate this momentous occasion. Members of the community had gathered at the spring by the time our field officers started arriving. We were welcomed by songs and the local Luhya Isukuti dance.

The local county assembly member who had helped provide the stones was also there, and in her remarks, she appreciated our team for implementing the project in Mutao. Our staff, in turn, thanked the community and the representative for supporting the project. She further urged members of Mutao to take good care of the project so that it serves them for a long time.

Rosa Kadenyi, a farmer in Mutao, spoke for the group when she shared her thoughts on the project:

“We have been [having] a difficult time while fetching water from the [unprotected] spring. Whenever it rains, the path becomes so slippery and inaccessible. We are grateful because the spring is now easily accessible. We came out in large numbers to help in the construction because we were so eager to access water from a new spring. This is the time when we say that God has visited us in person and he did not send his angels.”

Sanitation Platforms

All 5 sanitation platforms have been installed. These 5 families are happy about this milestone of having a private latrine of their own and are optimistic that people will no longer leave waste outdoors. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

A family stands as proud owners of a new sanitation platform

New Knowledge

Obed Khamasi, a leader within the Mutao community, was tasked with organizing the training. He gave us the community’s preferred date for training, for he was very much aware of the community calendar when it comes to planting season and other big events.

Field Officer Jacklyne Chelagat in action, leading training

26 women, men, and children attended training, which was as expected.  We did not start until noon since people in this community had requested to attend to their farms during the morning hours. This helped ensure that everyone was able to focus once they arrived. Because of the mid-day sun, the training was held under a tree for shade in Mr. Jacob Shikhule’s compound. This venue was ideal since his home is adjacent to Kenya Spring and situated along the path that leads to the spring. Mr. Shikule’s homestead served as a central place where each member of this community could access the training and spring with ease.

All participants were interested in and took part actively in the training. The training was organized into 2 levels across 2 days. The first level of training was predominantly practical while the second day was more theory sessions coupled with a few demonstrations. This organization encouraged active involvement and participation throughout both days.

Technical training on fencing at the spring

We covered several topics including leadership and governance; operation and maintenance of the spring; healthcare; family planning; immunizations; and the prevention and spread of disease. We also covered water treatment methods, personal care like handwashing, environmental hygiene, hygiene promotion, and many other things.

The handwashing session was very enjoyable. The facilitator demonstrated how to make and effectively use a tippy tap for handwashing, and then the fun started. Members of this community were so happy and eager to practice making a tippy tap. Each person was working hard to step on the tippy tap and wash their hands using the 10 steps.

Handwashing practice using a tippy tap

During the session on spring maintenance, we all marched to the spring and shared roles and responsibilities based on gender and age. The men were supposed to dig the drainage channel, young men were to do the fencing while women and children were supposed to plant grass. When all the groups were through we were all supposed to team up in cleaning the spring.

Working together to clean the spring

Members of this community appreciated this session’s teamwork, telling us “since the creation of the heavens and the earth they have never come together to perform any task together.” According to the community members who attended training, their village has only ever come together during bereavements and funerals. This training, therefore, marked the beginning of greater things that were to come to this community as a result of their newfound solidarity. At some stages of the maintenance, each group was competing with the other to see who would finish their task first. “It was just wonderful to see members of the community, local leadership, and the facilitators come together and work to achieve a common goal of accessing clean and safe water,” reported our Field Officer Jacklyne Chelagat.

“As a community, we are so grateful, we have learned a lot of new and very important information,” said Jackob Shikhule, a local farmer who depends on Kenya Spring for water. “During this training, we have also discovered the massive potential that lies within us. We were able to work together, share together, and we also managed to start a merry-go-round.”

Training complete!

The merry-go-round Jackob mentions is a financial tool the village decided to take up after their training. It will help community members collect money from each household monthly that will be used to make loans to one household each month to work on a development goal. We heard that a majority of them are planning to use the proceeds from the merry-go-round to buy sheep, goat, poultry, and cows for rearing. We saw strong commitment and zeal in each of the group’s members. Indeed water is life because the coming of this spring protection has also brought about ideas like these that have unleashed a lot of potential in the Mutao community members.

Using the same list of households the community members came up with for the merry-go-round, they also developed a duty rota for cleaning the spring. According to this arrangement, each household is supposed to clean and maintain the spring at least thrice per week.

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 31-kenya19130-thumbs-up-for-clean-water


08/19/2019: Mutao Community, Kenya Spring Underway!

Dirty water from Kenya Spring is making people in Mutao Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with news of success!


The Water Project : 2-kenya19130-community-members


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

Imago Dei Community