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The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  A Child Fetching Water At The Unprotected Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  A Family Carrying Water From The Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  A Latrine With Mud Walls
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  At The Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Bathing Shelter Next To Latrine
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Bathroom
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Goats
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Clothes Drying
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Coooking Stove
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Cow
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Filling Containers With Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Firewood
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Goats
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Kitchen Structure
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Lifting Bucket Filled With Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Mulutondo Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Temporary Pipe Afixed To The Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Walking Through Fields With Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Walking With Water
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Water Loaded On Her Head
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Water Pools Behind Spring
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Woman And Goat
The Water Project: Mubinga Community, Mulutondo Spring -  Young Girl Carries Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/31/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

Mubinga Community is a very peaceful and rural setting. The people here practice maize farming as the major cash crop, so it is a common sight to see the growing stalks across the landscape. While most people make a living selling their crops, some work as motorcycle or bike taxi drivers to make an income.

The buildings here are mixed. Many of the homes are mud-walled houses, but there are also some permanent cement buildings and homes scattered about the village.

An average day for a family in Mubinga begins at 6:00 am. They go to the farm after the children are off to school. The women will leave the farms at 1:00 pm to go and prepare lunch for the children and men. After resting a bit, the women go to the market at around 3:00 pm to sell and buy goods. People begin coming back home at 7:00 pm to prepare dinner and do other small house chores before they retire to bed at 9:00 pm.

For the 200 people here, Mulutondo Spring is the main water source. It is located near most of the homes since people here do not live too far from each other. The spring is located in an area with plenty of natural trees, but no eucalyptus that will threaten the water supply from the spring. People here report that this spring has been used by community members for more than 20 years.

While getting to the spring is easy, fetching water from it is not. The improvised discharge pipe is often swept away by water. And the water itself is not safe for drinking. It pools behind the discharge pipe before flowing out – leaving it open to contamination. As a result, people here are often sick due to waterborne infections caused by drinking this water.

“This is dangerous for us,” said Anastacia Khasungu, a 75-year-old farmer who uses the spring.

“We get sick most of the time because the water is not safe and we have no money for treatment. Life here is really hard.”

The lack of money has prevented people from addressing the problems caused by the spring. Ms. Khasungu explained that there has long been a desire to protect the spring, but the community is unable to come up with the money to pay for it. Some community members saw a nearby spring that we protected and they reached out to our teams to consider their spring.

The spring does not face issues during the dry season, meaning it is a good candidate for protection. Ms. Khasungu owns the land where the spring is located and agreed to continue to allow community members to access the spring after we are done with its protection.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will help provide access to cleaner and safer water. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a task carried by women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by freeing up more of their time and energy to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least 2 days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance.

The facilitator plans to use Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST), Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it is consumed. We will also emphasize the importance of handwashing.

Training will result in the formation of a committee that will oversee the operations and maintenance of the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage channels. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select 5 families that should benefit from new concrete latrine floors. Training will inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, including bricks, clean sand, and gravel. The 5 families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

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Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors