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The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Latrine
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Clothes Drying On Ground
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Dishes Drying On Ground
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Water Fetching Containers
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Using Spring Water To Do Laundry
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Village Elder Rebecca Ambasa Kutieto
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Samwel Magomere
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Children At Home
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Cow Grazing
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Children At Home
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Ebutindi Community, Esilaba Anjere Spring -  Preparing Land For Tilling

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  01/31/2020

Project Features


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It was partially sunny in the morning when we first visited Ebutindi, with thick clouds covering the sky that warmed the earth below. We really enjoyed doing our baseline survey during this weather.

Ebutindi is a very remote place with a good road network that connects neighboring schools and health centers and also helps farmers to ferry their goods to the markets. The place is very peaceful with just a little noise from motorbikes carrying people to the market as well as other destinations. The place looks very green because of tree plantations and farms. The crops grown here are vegetables of every kind, bananas, arrowroots, and sugarcane. The majority of people live in houses made of mud walls, iron sheet roofs, and wooden doors.

The 360 community members living in the area wake up as early as 6 in the morning, eat their breakfast, and go to their farms for the day’s farming activities. The day normally ends in the evening when community members head back to their homes to eat dinner and rest. Farmers engage in tilling their land, planting, and harvesting ready crops.

All of the day’s activities are made much more difficult without the presence of safe, clean drinking water. People put out pots and barrels when it rains, but the rainwater only lasts them a short time since it’s used for drinking, cooking, cleaning, bathing, watering animals, and irrigating crops. This forces people to leave home and look for water elsewhere, such as at Esilaba Anjere Spring.

The spring needs to be protected as soon as possible so that the community members may be able to access safe, clean drinking water. The water is highly contaminated and you can even see green algae growing inside the water.

Nonetheless, the spring is always busy with people fetching water from morning hours until evening, and sometimes even night time. Water is collected using jugs to fetch, a sieve to trap any solid material that is collected while fetching the water, then pouring the water into a bigger container.

“When there is not enough safe drinking water, it is like there is no life. You will see people trying to at least find something to quench their thirst which if not achieved, makes someone very weak and exhausted and unable to concentrate well while doing other tasks – which really lowers productivity,” said Mr. Magomere, a farmer. With lack of safe water here, people just drink whatever they can get their hands on. This means people regularly suffer from illnesses like typhoid that put them out of commission, unable to provide for their families.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

Protection of this spring will greatly increase access to safe clean drinking water for this community which has been trying up and down to find a solution. Though water from this spring is not safe for human consumption, community members drink before treating it – which has put the lives of innocent children at risk (they are more susceptible to waterborne diseases). Community members narrated to us the kind of sufferings they have been undergoing due to consumption of water from this unprotected source. Some of them have been spending money in hospitals and health centers treating preventable diseases like typhoid and amoeba, all because they get their water from Esilaba Anjere Spring.

We will protect the spring to ensure that the water is safe, adequate, and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. There will be stairs down to the collection point and a pipe that can easily fill water containers. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Training

We met with Village Elder Kutieto during our visit to the spring. “As a leader of community health volunteers, I have been trying to encourage my people of whom I also happen to be their village elder, to improvise a leaky tin (handwashing station) and place it near their latrines, but we still face challenges. People without a sanitation facility are urged to work hard and ensure that they acquire one to avoid open defecation in this village,” she said.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

The latrines are regularly cleaned by sweeping them and applying ash to kill the smell that would build up from the pit. Since these latrines are made of wooden floors, no water is kept nearby. If they are cleaned with water, the floors can rot away quickly and pose a threat to latrine users.

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should most benefit from new cement latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

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Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


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