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The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Latrine Floor
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Mud Latrine
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Ebby Mulyango
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Edward Sabwa
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Mosquito Net Fence
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Kisasi Community, Edward Sabwa Spring -  Banana Farm

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/20/2019

Project Features


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It was a cold and rainy day our first visit to Kisasi. Us field officers had to wait for two hours before touring the village because it started to downpour as soon as we got there.

A lot of noise is heard in Kisasi. There are hooting horns and wailing sirens of vehicles and motorbikes moving along the nearby main road. Children make a lot of noise in the evenings when they come from school, especially at the spring where they meet to draw water. There are a lot of trees in this area, and tea, vegetables and maize crops are also planted on numerous farms.

Everyone is awake by 5:30 am. They prepare and eat breakfast, then disperse to different places like the market for those in business or to the farms for those who are farmers. They all plan how to balance making a living with preparing lunch, feeding animals, and fetching water. Most people end the day at 8 pm because there is no electricity here.

Since there isn’t any water at home, fetching water becomes the most disruptive activity of the day. People have to take up their water container and go out into the community to find water. 203 people in this area are reported to rely on Edward Sabwa Spring to get water for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and many other things.

The surrounding environment is filthy, and people step in the muddy and grubby water as they fetch it. The bushes around the spring aren’t clear and could be hiding snakes. A plastic pipe has been inserted where water is flowing and surrounded by rocks to stabilize it. The pipe makes it a little bit easier to fill a container with water, but the water flowing into the pipe is still open to contamination from the surrounding environment.

Most people here have been treated by either native doctors or in the local clinic after drinking this dirty water. They spend money that could have used profitably in another area. If they had access to adequate and safe water, they would save that money and invest it in development. “We suffer from diarrhea because we drink dirty water. Come to our rescue, because it will save us from wasting time and money in search of medical attention,” said Mr. Sabwa.

What we can do:

Spring Protection

We will protect the spring to ensure that the water is safe, adequate, and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. There will be stairs down to the collection point and a pipe that can easily fill water containers. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Training

There are homes at which mosquito nets are used to fence gardens to keep chicken away – as opposed to preventing malaria. Poverty has become the order of the day to the extent that some people have given up hope of ever living good lives free from struggles. “We are used to poverty to the extent that we only struggle to get food to eat, nothing more because the more we try the more we get disappointed,” said Ebby Mulyango.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance (including the use of mosquito nets!). The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

There are many latrines in the village, but they are not in good condition. Latrines are made of mud, which cannot get wet without compromising the latrines’ integrity. Floors are even made of mud that puts the latrine users at risk of falling through to the pit.

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should most benefit from new cement latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

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Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors