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The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Spring Foundation
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Excavation
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Spring Care Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Spring Care Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Dental Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Question About Toothbrushing
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  People Were Not Shy To Ask Questions
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Group Discussion
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Clothes Drying On Ground
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Latrines Are Very Rare In The Community
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Henry Sumba
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Water Storage In Kitchen
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Rose Anzwenu
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring -  Farming

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 280 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 06/18/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Eshiakhulo Community is a rural, peaceful, and vegetated farming community. Farmers living here used to specialize in sugarcane to sell to the Mumias Sugar Company, but the factory has since gone under. Now that there isn’t an easy place to sell sugarcane, farmers plant more diverse crops and their wives have to work just as hard as their husbands to earn enough income. Because of this, the extended family often lives with a nuclear family so that grandparents can take care of grandchildren while the parents are out working.

An average day starts at 6 am as children prepare for school. Children rush to fetch water from an unprotected spring, making several trips to get enough. They hurry back to eat breakfast with the other members of the family. People like to do their farm work in the early morning before the sun is too high in the sky.

The hottest hours are weathered indoors or in the shade, and work starts back up at 3pm as people go to the market to trade for what they need to make dinner.

The unprotected spring children rush to every morning is called Asman Sumba Spring. The water there is unsafe for drinking. It is covered in green algae and the banks are muddy. It gets very hard to fetch water when it rains as the chance of slipping and falling in the mud is high. Community members fixed a pipe in the ground to make water a little easier to fetch, but this isn’t protecting the water from contamination.

Wild animals, cats, dogs, and cattle can come right up to the spring and drink directly from it. Nonetheless, people fill their containers with this water to bring it back for drinking, cooking, and cleaning.

”I found people fetching water from this spring since I got married in 1974. It’s not safe for us but because we have nowhere else to get water we usually drink it,” said Rose Anzwenu.

“Recently my grandchild was admitted to the hospital because of stomachache and diarrhea, which I suspect the cause might be this water.”

What we can do:

Training

”Most of the latrines in this community are in a bad state and not safe for use, especially during raining season when they do collapse… The hygiene on the other hand is not good because some people don’t have latrines which forces some to use sugarcane plantations and bushes,” said Mr. Sumba.

The sanitation and hygiene situation here is not good. A few families have tried to build latrines and have clotheslines and dish racks, but the majority do not have them. Therefore, the community needs improvement in building safe latrines, cleaning them, and covering them regularly. They need dish racks and clotheslines to dry their things safely off the ground.

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should most benefit from new latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Project Updates


06/18/2019: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring Project Complete

Eshiakhulo Community is celebrating its new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Asman Sumba Spring has been transformed into a flowing, safe source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

Spring Protection

Construction at Asman Sumba Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

”For a very long time, ever since I got married, I have been drinking unclean water. I have been suffering – getting sick every now and then because of bad water but now the water project for which you came and protected our water,” said Mrs. Anzwenu.

“I will not fall sick again because of dirty water.”

After visiting this community sometime back last year to assess the need, we were first able to schedule the protection of Asman Sumba Spring for August 2019. But amazingly enough for this community, a slot opened up in March and they were asked if they were willing to host the project early. Community members didn’t hesitate to say yes and were ready for our work team within four days. They had gathered all of the supplementary materials like stones and sand that would be needed.

The Process:

The community worked alongside our artisan to make this spring protection successful, gathering supplementary materials like sand and stones and making meals for the work team.

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete. Cement, waterproof coating, ballast, and sand were mixed together to make a very strong foundation.

Brickwork started whereby the artisan took all of the required measurements of the spring structure before proceeding with the work. Construction of the superstructure continued with discharge pipes fixed in the brick wall. Stairs were built on one side of the spring to allow in and out movement by users.

Stone pitching along the lower part of the spring was done to prevent soil from eroding and blocking the outlet drainage. Finally, the plastering of the walls and the floor was done, and tiles were placed below the discharge pipes to keep the falling water from hitting the cement.

The spring was then left for two days to undergo curing and hardening before being backfilled using stones.

Polythene was stretched across the top and covered with soil to allow clean water to flow from the pipe. Community members promised to dig cut-off drainage at the slope of the spring to divert surface water from entering the spring and to also plant grass over the protected area to prevent erosion. They have already planted a fence that protects the area behind the spring from animals and people who would cross through the area.

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We will continue to encourage them to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors as we visit for monitoring and evaluation.

A couple next to their new sanitation platform and the pit they sunk for their latrine

New Knowledge

As we began building the protection at Asman Sumba Spring, we saw it wise to train all of the beneficiaries who fetch water from this spring. We wanted to provide knowledge and understanding about how they will handle the spring to keep it safe as well as teach them about good hygiene and sanitation. We were able to recruit participants through the contact person and his mother, who are both spring users. They went around and invited other spring users to attend.

During our training sessions, it was hot and sunny, but we were not affected in any way since the training took place at a homestead with a lot of shade trees.

Participants learned about:

– Leadership and governance for the spring committee

During this session, the facilitator grouped the participants into three groups for brainstorming and discussions. It was great to see how involved everyone was and how eager they were to elect water committee users to oversee spring activities.


– Management and maintenance of the spring


– Income-generating activities
– Personal hygiene, highlighting handwashing and dental hygiene

Dental hygiene training

Community members were surprised about there being ten steps of handwashing. They also learned that they should always use running water and a cleaning agent. They promised to practice the steps immediately as they were going to take their lunch.

– Environmental hygiene

The facilitator asked the participants how often they clean their bedding. They should be airing them as well as cleaning their bedrooms. The majority responded by saying they normally wash their bedding once a month, while others would rarely do so. The trainer informed them that they should be airing their bedding outside in direct sunlight by hanging them on a clothesline and cleaning their bedrooms on a daily basis to prevent bedbugs and lice.

– Waterborne and water-related disease, along with water treatment methods

”This training will change our lives so much since almost everything you have taught has really touched us very much. We are seeing that we have been doing things out of ignorance without knowing the consequences,” said Mr. Makokha.

Thank You for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 19-kenya19182-flowing-water


04/17/2019: Eshiakhulo Community, Asman Sumba Spring Project Underway

Dirty water from Asman Sumba Spring is making people in Eshiakhulo Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to solve this issue by building a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out again with news of success!


The Water Project : 3-kenya19182-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


Contributors

Yakima Foursquare Church
Bounce Treatment Services
Greater Kansas City Community Foundation
Catherine's Campaign for Water
6 individual donor(s)