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The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Program: The Water Promise - Kenya

Impact: 120 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Jan 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/04/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Safe Water and Sustainable Hygiene Initiative (SAWASHI). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Background Information

Kimanget Village is located in Kimanget Location, East Kabras Division, Malava Sub-County of Kakamega North County. There are approximately 20 different households with five to eight family members each. These families rely on small scale farming of maize and sugarcane.

As in most communities, the woman’s responsibilities are domestic chores and child-rearing, while the man’s responsibility is to provide food. One of the most important daily chores of a mother or girl child is to fetch water regardless of time taken, distance traveled, or water quality.

In 1999, a hand-dug well was built by the Kenya Finland Company in order to reduce the distance walked for water, and to reduce the cases of waterborne diseases in the village. Unfortunately the well’s hand pump was vandalized in 2006.

The community members were forced to break the well pad to access water with a rope and bucket. Since the well is now open, it is contaminated both by natural and human activities. After drinking the well’s dirtied water, disease has been on the rise. The community is asking for help with installing a new hand pump.

Current Water Source

The community uses this contaminated borehole as their only water source. This water is used for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and farming.

Hygiene and Sanitation

A large percentage of the population has been suffering from waterborne disease, with children and the elderly especially susceptible to typhoid and diarrhea.

Only a few compounds have installed sanitation facilities like dish racks, clotheslines, and compost pits.

There is a need for training to change ignorance and negative attitudes about good hygiene. Training will deal with proper hand-washing, food preparation and handling, water storage, and personal hygiene.

Water Committee

The community has come together and elected a group of strong people to act as a Water Committee. This committee will oversee the rehabilitated well’s management and maintenance.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

The implementation of this project included the local government administration who supported fully on the ground.

Training was organized through the help of local government administration, who ensured that at least one member of every household attended. Participants gathered at the old well for on site, interactive training sessions. These sessions were held over the course of three days: two days for hygiene and sanitation topics, and one day to form and educate a water user committee. It was observed that a total of nine men and eight women attended each day. The facilitator was also impressed with their enthusiasm participating with each other during activities and discussions. Sometimes women tend to be more engaged than men, for communities are often influenced by the belief that women are the only ones responsible for their family’s health and water situation. However, the training facilitator was pleasantly surprised that both men and women participated in the sessions and plan to practice what they learned.

Posters functioned as the main teaching tool, illustrating both good and bad behaviors related to personal and environmental hygiene. The facilitator lectured on these and also passed them out to participants, letting them identify and discuss what the observed.

Topics covered during training were:

– Proper food preparation and storage

– Developing positive attitudes and hygiene and sanitation

– Waterborne diseases and their prevention

– General environmental health

– Hand-washing techniques

After training, community members were optimistic, promising to change their behavior and begin practicing good hygiene and sanitation. Men as well as the women will be responsible for checking the current hygiene status in their households. They will then make needed improvements together. “In my home we have been washing hands without soap in one basin, since we now know the risks of not washing hands with soap, we will wash our hands with soap and running water,” says the caretaker of the water well, Mr. Mandila Kofia.

A visit will be made after a period of three months to assess hygiene and sanitation practices. The water user committee was formed and strengthened so that it can oversee the management and maintenance of this water project. Every member agrees to pay a fee that will be saved in an emergency fund used for well repairs. If the community encounters any more issues, it will be this committee that contacts the water, hygiene and sanitation organization for help.

Project Result: Rehabilitated Hand-Dug Well

A team of four men began construction on January 25. The men started by removing the old well pad in order to prepare it for new plastering. The well cap was put aside to draw water for construction, and was then fixed back on carefully. Workers made sure the cap was reinstalled properly, ensuring there was no gaps that allow for re-contamintation. Sand, water and cement was mixed to make a smooth plaster. After plastering the new well pad, it was left to cure for some days. Workers are prepared to return on February 5 for water quality testing.

During the two construction days, community members helped whenever necessary. They provided constant, day and night security for construction tools and materials. At the end of the project, Mr. Kofia added that he plans to move closer to the well to ensure its constant upkeep and safety: “We have suffered a lot on issue about water, for security purpose of our new pump, one of my sons will build a home near the well.”

The Water Project and the people of Kimanget Village Thank You for unlocking potential!

 

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Kimanget Community

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well with the Kimanget Community in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Paul Weringa, with you.


The Water Project : kimanget-community-1


02/03/2016: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project Complete

We are excited to inform you that the well in Kimanget Village is now protected and in working condition! A sustainable project doesn’t result from rushing into an area, drilling a hole and leaving it; wells don’t last forever! That’s why rehabilitation projects are so important, and why monitoring this well is a priority. The community also formed a water user committee that will manage and maintain the water well. This committee, along with others from their community, also participated in a comprehensive hygiene and sanitation training. You can find updated training and construction details in the online project report, including new pictures. Please take a moment to enjoy all the work you made possible.

The Water Project and people of Kimanget Village Thank You for unlocking potential!


The Water Project : 18-kenya4401-water-flowing


12/09/2015: Update from the Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project

We wanted to give you the latest news from the Kimanget village well rehabilitation project in Kenya. Community education and training is currently happening. Most businesses in Kenya stop working from December 20th through the beginning of the New Year. We know our partners will be hard at work on this rehab early in January.

Thank you for your patience. We’ll let you know as soon as we receive anything new.


The Water Project : kenya4401-08-farming


12/02/2015: Kimanget Well Rehabilitation Project Underway

We are excited to announce that, thanks to your willingness to help, Kimanget Village will soon have a new source of safe, clean water. A broken well is being rehabilitated so it will be a reliable resource, and the community will receive training in sanitation and hygiene. Together these resources will help stop the spread of disease in the area. We just posted a report including information about the community, GPS coordinates and pictures. We’ll keep you posted as the work continues.

Take a look, and Thank You for your help!


The Water Project : kenya4401-04-broken-well


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - Yakima Foursquare Church

A Year Later: Kimanget Community

December, 2017

As a healthy people in a healthy community, we no longer spend most of our time in the hospitals. Instead, we spend time on our small farms planting and harvesting our crops. We can put food on the table for our families.

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well with the Kimanget Community in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Paul Weringa, with you.


Kimanget was like dozens of other Kenyan communities, facing waterborne diseases on a daily basis. They were drawing dirty water from an open well, and the community members did not know of treating water before drinking.

Rehabilitating the well by building a well pad and installing an AfriDev pump, and training the community members on good hygiene and sanitation has really improved health here.

Without having to face waterborne diseases, much has been achieved in terms of food production on their farms.


We met well caretaker Beatrice Naliaka to talk about how life has changed for her and her community over the past year. “As a healthy people in a healthy community, we no longer spend most of our time in the hospitals. Instead, we spend time on our small farms planting and harvesting our crops. We can put food on the table for our families.

When we used to pull a bucket from the well to get water, we used to experience chest and back pains. This problem has been solved by the installation of the pump, and now fetching water has become easier.”

Paul stands with Eglay at her clean water source.

We also met 9-year-old Eglay Meshack, a young girl who came to fetch water for her mother. She agreed with Mrs. Naliaka, saying “Since the project was brought to our community, it has become easier to help my parents fetch water for construction of our house, bathing, washing utensils, washing clothes and cooking.”

The only challenge here is that many people are still not willing to contribute fees for their well, which would be used for maintenance. They have the idea that water should be free, but the well is really providing a service that needs to be maintained to ensure sustainability. Our team continues to engage with them on this through our quarterly monitoring visits and other trainings.


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.