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The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 450 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Apr 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 09/17/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Safe Water and Sustainable Hygiene Initiative (SAWASHI). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Background Information

Like people of many other communities, Ikoli people are peasant farmers who grow sugarcane as their main cash crop. Some of the community members are employed by the nearby sugar factory known as the West Kenya Sugar Company. Most of the young people are jobless, which has negatively affected the overall economic value of this community. According to the women with whom we spoke, most husbands neglect their responsibilities, forcing their wives to carry them out.

Most children cannot complete their studies due to the high poverty level, and young girls and boys are prone to early marriages.

The Current Source

She has been married and living in this community for over 27 years; blessed with four children and six grandchildren, Mama Agnes Kinyambu does not hide her joy while receiving us in her home.

“I came from the eastern part of Kenya where water is an issue. When I first came to this place, I could spent the whole day just watching and wondering how water can flow from a stream without drying up for many years and nobody seems to be amazed like me,” Mama Agnes describes. “In Eastern Kenya, to have rain is a historic thing… With this mind in me, I did not mind drinking any water until when I was diagnosed with typhoid.” Mrs. Agnes tells of how she used to go fetch water from an unprotected stream until she and other women began complaining of chest pain.

Mrs. Agnes says that she spent a lot of time in a hospital bed for chest treatment. And finally, a well was dug by the Kenya Finland Company in 1990. “I was excited when a pump was installed on the well. At least the distance covered and time spent was reduced. Because we did not have knowledge on how to repair the well once it fails and where to access the spare parts, the pump was dumped and people went back to access water from the old spring. Knowing that I have health problems, I decided to mobilize a few community members and contributed towards the reconstruction of the well pad after the pump was vandalized.”

Even though she appreciates the fact that she no longer has to walk so far to the spring, she also worries about the quality of the well’s water because there is continued recontamination happening as a result of using a bucket tied on a rope. With a bucket and rope instead of a working pump, the well is now open to surface runoff and other contaminants. “I pray that the good Samaritans will come in very soon so as to have a new pump. This will be of help to me and other old women in this area. With safe water, I am assured of having a bonus of living long,” said Mrs. Agnes, tears rolling down her cheeks.

Sanitation Situation

About 75% of homes have pit latrines, and everyone in the community has access to one. These latrines are semi-permanent structures that have doors, but the holes are not covered. This allows bad odor and flies to leave the facility and contaminate the surrounding environment. No hand-washing stations or tippy taps were seen in the area. The majority of families dispose of their garbage in large, open spaces such as the banana plantations. During the initial visit, it was obvious that only a few people have any knowledge about good hygiene and sanitation practices.

Two more hand-washing stations will be installed in the form of “tippy taps.” Tippy taps are containers tied to ropes, which tip to pour water for hand-washing. Community members will learn how and when to use these stations during hygiene and sanitation training.

Training Sessions

Hygiene and sanitation training will inform Ikoli community members of the practical ways they can take care of themselves and their environment. Participants will be trained for three days on various topics. Some of these topics are:

– Hand-washing

– Proper water storage and effective treatment

– Food preparation, handling, and storage

– Forming an effective water user committee

The water user committee will fund repairs, maintain, and keep the well site secure.

The training facilitator plans to use the PHAST (Participatory Health and Sanitation Training) method to teach the above topics and more, and will return in July to hold a refresher training, check the new well, and assess if the community has made any progress.

Project Results: Training

Hygiene and sanitation training was held in the community for three hours, three days in a row. When it started earlier in the morning, attendance was low because many members prioritized working on their farms. By around 10am, at least 20 people arrived for the training, giving each household in the community at least one representative. The training was interactive as both men and women were able to discuss issues of poor hygiene and sanitation affect them on a daily basis. The trainer covered the planned topics, and the community members appeared to greatly appreciate what they learned. They realized all of these things are very important to their health and should be put in practice immediately.

After training, housewife and mother Silvia Khati Ashiono said, “I have been ignoring the aspect of water treatment thinking that it’s more expensive. Only to realize that at 20 Kenyan shillings, I have chlorine that can help me for one and a half months. I choose to treat my water before drinking!”

Well Rehabilitation

Repairs began on April 18th. The team started by removing the old cracked well pad with chisels and mallets. When demolition was complete, they could mix concrete, sand, water, and cement to plaster a new well pad. This was then left to cure for three days before installing a new Afridev pump.

There were no challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. All the while, the community provided meals for the construction team and made sure they were well-taken care of. Farmer Agness Kinyambu said that “the construction work is done well. I love the cooperation the team has, and more so the endurance of the conditions in our community. We really appreciate their good efforts!”

By the end of training, the community had also formed a water user committee in charge of security, management, and maintenance of the rehabilitated well.

On conclusion of the rehabilitation project, the community came together full of joy to receive their new water system. The women could not hide their happiness, since they now have the assurance of accessing clean and safe water for their families. This water well has helped lift some of this huge burden from their shoulders.

(Editor’s Note: GPS coordinates for this project are approximate.)

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Ikoli Community

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well with the Ikoli Community in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Paul Weringa, with you.


The Water Project : ikoli-community-jackline-paul-wuc-member-1


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


"The women could not hide their happiness, since they now have the assurance of accessing clean and safe water for their families."

A Year Later: Ikoli Community

December, 2017

…we knew that our children were at risk of falling in the hole. Now, we do not have to worry anymore since the place is covered. Life in general is good to us especially women and children since the pump was installed on our well.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well with the Ikoli Community in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Paul Weringa, with you.


There is much less waterborne disease here, thanks to the rehabilitation of this well. Before the pump was installed on the well, the community members used to fetch water by using a bucket and rope.

Now, the community finally drinks clean water that has no negative effects to their health. Without spending much on hospital bills, the beneficiaries are now strong enough to do other activities on their farms, and now they have enough food in their homes. As they would always say, “a sick person cannot work on the farm” and therefore this affected the level of food production.

We met with Jackline Paul to talk about what’s been happening in Ikoli since last year. She said, “As a woman representing the views of other women, it’s true to say that accessing the water from the well by use of a pump is a big achievement. This is because anytime we would pull the heavy bucket loaded with water from the hole, our backs and chests would be pain all through. But now all we have to do is pump the water out. By using the rope and the bucket we knew that we were consuming dirty water. This could be felt when all our household members would complain of stomachache which when diagnosed, diarrhea and typhoid were the prevalent issues. Before the pump was installed, dead bodies of frogs and other small creatures could be found in the water already decomposing. This was a threat to our health.

Jackline Paul

Sometimes women would send their children to the open hole and every time we thought about this, we knew that our children were at risk of falling in the hole. Now, we do not have to worry anymore since the place is covered. Life in general is good to us especially women and children since the pump was installed on our well.”


Little Bilha Mukonyole, pumping water in the video above, agreed with Jackline. She said, “Fetching water has become easier for me and whenever my mother sends me to fetch water, I don’t complain.”


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Ikoli Community Well Rehabilitation Project – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

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Contributors

Project Underwriter - Sunbridge Foundation - Jim and Catherine Allchin
1 individual donor(s)