Loading images...
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -
The Water Project: Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jul 2016

Functionality Status:  Water Flowing - Needs Attention

Last Checkup: 10/11/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Safe Water and Sustainable Hygiene Initiative (SAWASHI). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Sharambatsa Community is situated in the center of Matsakha Village, and is home to 300 people from 25 different households. The community is surrounded by sugarcane plantations on all sides. Apart from sugarcane, Sharambatsa farmers also plant bananas, maize, beans, and other kinds of vegetables that when sold, provide their daily bread and income. Most houses are thatched with grass. In this community men are most concerned with raising school fees for their children and being there as family leaders.

For a normal day, women wake up early in the morning to till their small farms and then walk to fetch water for domestic use. Due to the high poverty level in this community, most children can’t afford to attend school. Instead they will help their parents earn money, and often get married at a very young age.

Water Situation

Kenya Finland Company installed a hand-dug well for this community in year 1989. However, the well was given with no warranty. Soon after, the pump was vandalized. Locals didn’t know how to source the replacement parts or even repair the pump if they had the means. They felt there was no other option but to remove the pump and access the water inside by another means. Today, women and children use a bucket tied to the end of a rope to fetch their water.

When the rope and bucket contraption isn’t being used, it sits on the ground. During our first visit, we immediately noticed that this plastic container and the rope were very dirty. Each time people use it to fetch water, there’s no doubt they’re rinsing a little of that dirt off in the well water. But even if they regularly cleaned the bucket, the absence of a pump and complete well pad is allowing contamination to wash back into the unprotected well’s water. Water from this source is used for cooking and drinking, though community members often complain of typhoid and diarrhea.

Sanitation Situation

Most households have pit latrines made of mud with cloth or banana leaves for doors. Some families have helpful tools like dish racks and clotheslines, while others do not. No hand-washing stations were observed. Relatively speaking, Sharambatsa community members have some knowledge about good hygiene and sanitation practices. The training facilitator has thus determined that sessions will be helpful in fortifying what some families know, while teaching the others what they didn’t. Unfortunately, even if one person chooses not to use a latrine or wash their hands, it can affect the entire community. Local farmer Ayan Kasiti says that “due to bad practice of hygiene and sanitation in our community, we are affected with waterborne diseases that cost us a lot in treatment.” Training will teach participants about the chain of contamination and how to prevent the spread of germs – to put a kink in the chain!

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Community members will be invited to attend hygiene and sanitation training for three days. The  facilitator will use the PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Training) method to teach the following topics:

  • Disease transmission routes
  • Creating barriers to disease
  • Proper food preparation and storage
  • General household hygiene
  • Forming a strong water user committee

After a tour of Sharambatsa and interviews with community members, the facilitator decided these would be the most important topics on which to focus their time.

Plans: Well Rehabilitation and Hand-Washing Stations

Two hand-washing stations will be delivered before training so that they may be used for demonstrations and practice. The community will also be taught about how to maintain the stations, filling them regularly and cleaning the containers. They will also need to keep an eye on the amount of cleaning agent (soap or ash) that is available.

The well is located on public property central to most in Sharambatsa. Second, the water level has never failed the community through even the dry seasons. Third, local leadership is highly involved in and excited about this water project. Upon our first visit, all of the leadership was present to give us a warm welcome. Leadership has promised to encourage each family to fully participate in both training and project construction. They have also agreed to fill a seat on the water user committee to ensure that the rehabilitated well can serve the community for a long, long time. Upon hearing of these three important factors and after meeting with Sharambatsa families and leadership, we have decided that this well is a wonderful candidate for a rehabilitation project.

Project Updates


11/15/2017: A Year Later: Sharambatsa Community

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well for Sharambatsa Community in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one with you.


The Water Project : 4526-yar-1


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


A Year Later: Sharambatsa Community

October, 2017

“Compared to the previous years where the community used to drink contaminated water, there is a big improvement in health since the rehabilitation was done a year ago.”

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped rehabilitate a well for Sharambatsa Community in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one with you.

We never cease to be amazed by the many ways access to water and sanitation unlocks potential in communities. WASH officer Paul Weringa recently visited Sharambatsa to check on the status of the well and see how life has changed over the past year. “Compared to the previous years where the community used to drink contaminated water, there is a big improvement in health since the rehabilitation was done a year ago.” These are the results we always hope to see: clean water and proper sanitation leading to strong, healthy communities.

4526 YAR 3

Our eyes were opened by the conversation Paul had with community security officer Joyce Halma Wasike. “As a wife of my own family, it’s become easier to ensure that my family is clean and that the house is in order. Doing this by pulling a bucket from the well was difficult. As a result of pulling the bucket loaded with water from the well, back and chest pains were common among women and children. Since we have the Afridev pump on the well, it has saved us from such pains.” Rehabilitating the well a year ago not only protected the water inside from contamination, but also protected those gathering water from painful labor and the danger of falling in!

4526 YAR 2

While we are thrilled with the progress we see at Sharambatsa, there are still challenges to overcome. Ms. Wasike said, “Because of the pre-conceived idea that water is free, some of the community members are having difficulties in giving their monthly contributions towards the sustainability of the water project.” Paul and the SAWASHI team have noticed the same thing and are committed to working with the community to help them understand the importance of maintaining the well so that all of these positive changes continue.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Sharambatsa Well Rehabilitation Project – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Corinthian International Foundation/Mariah Bailey
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. South Middlesex Alumnae Chap
The Swanson Family Charitable Fund
Wynne High School/Interact Club
Faith Chapel
Haircuts for Hope @ UChicago
23 individual donor(s)