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The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -
The Water Project: IFC Church Makunga -

Project Status



Project Type:  Well Rehab

Program: Well Rehab in Kenya

Impact: 350 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Feb 2013

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/09/2020

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is part of Bridge Water Project’s program in Western Kenya. What follows is direct from them, edited for clarity:

PROPOSED PROJECT

The proposed International fellowship of the clergy church was started in the year 1988 with an aim of transforming people’s lives through ministry of a priest characterized by love, holiness and sub-mission to authority. The church has a small piece of land which is used for growing maize, beans and vegetables. When harvested they are used on feeding the less fortunate in the society and orphans among the faithful church members .However, above all water is a major challenge since had a well which was drilled several years ago but have never succeeded in getting a full pump to be installed. Only a pump stand was fitted in the hope of getting a full hand pump in future. Therefore the church management committee has loudly blown out their trumpet appealing for intervention from well wishers to step in and provide a solution for the problem to enable them access water from the well.

 CURRENT WATER SOURCE

The church gets water from a stream located 1Km away. The water from the stream is contaminated and not safe for human consumption. The stream dries up during dry seasons. The turbidity value of the water from the stream is 50. 

 POPULATION

The church has a population of 300 Christians 50 nursery kids from the nursery school.

HYGIENE AND SANITATION

The hygiene and sanitation of the church is good despite lack of quality water. The toilets are washed twice a week as well as the church hall. A composite pit is available where all litter is thrown.

 PROJECT BENEFICIARIES

When the pump will be installed, the well will greatly benefit the I.F.C church, the surrounding community and the nursery school.

 ASSESSING THE NEED

There is need to install an Affridev pump on the borehole for the church which will provide consistent quality water supply that will meet the church’s domestic needs and that can be relied on throughout the year and improving health standards of the Christians  and their neighboring community members.

WATER COMMITTEE

The church management board is organized that there is already a water committee.

Project Updates


08/05/2020: Through Their Eyes: COVID-19 Chronicles with James Odindo Oyula

This post is part of a new series by The Water Project meant to highlight the perspectives and experiences of the people we serve and how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting them. We invite you to read more of their stories here.

Our team recently visited Makunga to conduct a COVID-19 prevention training (read more about it below!) and monitor their water point. Shortly after, we returned to check in on the community, offer a COVID-19 refresher training, and ask how the pandemic is affecting their lives.

It was during this most recent visit that James Odindo Oyula shared his story of how the coronavirus has impacted her his life.

Field Officer William Muruli met James outside his home to conduct the interview. Both William and James observed social distancing and other precautions throughout the visit to ensure their health and safety. The following is James’s story, in his own words.


What is one thing that has changed in your community since the construction of the well?

“Reduction in waterborne diseases due to the availability of clean driving water.”

How has having a clean water point helped you through the pandemic so far?

“We have constant reliable water for frequent washing of hands and cleaning houses.”

Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Kenya, has fetching water changed for you because of restrictions, new rules, or your concerns about the virus?

“Yes, we have changed our behavior at the pump. We don’t encourage overcrowding and ask parents not to send children to the water point.”

How has COVID-19 impacted your family?

“I have grandchildren whom I have to closely monitor even at the playground within the home to ensure they are not mingling haphazardly.”

What other challenges are you experiencing due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

“Some Visitors are hard to control. I have a handwashing station just outside the house yet some don’t want to wash there hands and when you insist they say you are looking down upon them.”

What hygiene and sanitation steps have you and your community taken to stop the spread of the virus?

“I have procured a hand washing station, we use masks, avoiding crowds as much as possible and sensitizing my family members every now and then.”

What restriction were you most excited to see lifted already?

“The restriction on Church worship.”

What restriction are you still looking forward to being lifted?

“Opening of schools.”

When asked where he receives information about COVID-19, James listed the radio, television, newspaper, word of mouth, and our team’s sensitization training.

What has been the most valuable part of the COVID-19 sensitization training you received from our team?

“Symptoms for COVID-19 I was not aware and making of our on face masks.”


The Water Project : covid19-kenya4151-odundo-james-wearing-a-face-mask


Project Photos


Project Type

Well rehabilitation is one of the most cost effective ways to bring clean, safe water to a community.  Sometimes it involves fixing a broken hand pump, other times it means sealing a hand dug well to prevent it from being contaminated.  These repairs, and often time total replacements, coupled with sanitation and hygiene training make a huge impact in communities.