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The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -
The Water Project: Emulembwa Community -

Project Status



Project Type:  Well Rehab

Program: Well Rehab in Kenya

Impact: 160 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2014

Functionality Status:  Low/No Water or Mechanical Breakdown

Last Checkup: 09/12/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is part of Bridge Water Project’s program in Western Kenya. What follows is direct from them:

PROPOSED PROJECT

The proposed Emulembwa community water project is a hand dug well that was done by the Kefinco (Kenya Finland Company) in the year 1988. Since there was no proper management committee to oversee the water system, the well did not serve the community for a long period of time. According to the information gathered from the community members, one person, who was an older gentleman, maintained the well and when he passed away, no one was left to oversee the operations of the well.

A section of young ladies organized in a group known as Ababukha self-help group came up with the resolutions of overseeing the well’s operations. The group took up the responsibility until the year 2002 when the pump was completely worn out hence could not help repair it again. At this point, the community went back to fetch water from the unprotected spring which is approximately 3km away.

With the formation of a strong water committee and proper community sensitization, BWP has seen the need to rehabilitate the well by cleaning and installing an afridev pump. This will save the community members from the outbreak of water borne diseases which occur as a result of drinking contaminated water from the spring which is also seasonal.

CURRENT WATER SOURCE

As indicated earlier, the Emulembwa community members access water from a spring which is located 3km away. The spring is seasonal (dries up during dry seasons) and heavy rains and animals who are also watered there contaminate its water.

As a result of drinking this water, the community members have experienced diseases like diarrhea, cholera and typhoid. This has been occurring mainly to children and people of old age.

POPULATION

The EMULEMBWA community has a population of approximately 30 households where as each household has a population of 5 to 6 members.

HYGIENE AND SANITATION

At least every household has a latrine. No hand washing is done as no hand washing points could be seen during our visits. Neither cloth lines nor dish racks in most homes. Water taken from the spring is not treated. 

WATER COMMITTEE

A strong water committee will be formed prior to the implementation of the project. The water committee will be in charge on the water system to ensure good maintenance and sustainability. 

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Project Photos


Project Type

Well rehabilitation is one of the most cost effective ways to bring clean, safe water to a community.  Sometimes it involves fixing a broken hand pump, other times it means sealing a hand dug well to prevent it from being contaminated.  These repairs, and often time total replacements, coupled with sanitation and hygiene training make a huge impact in communities.


Contributors

The Blanke Foundation
The H. Evan Zeiger, Jr. & Margaret Zeiger Charitable Foundation