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The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Chief Happyily Splashing Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Principal Celebrating With Students For Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Principal Madam Melvina E Sumanna Happy Drinking Clean And Pure Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Principal Madam Mevinal E Sumanna
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Teacher And Student Celebrating For Safe Drinking Water Provide Forthe At Their School
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Celebrating Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Happy Collecting Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Happy Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Happy Splashing Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Teachers Celebrating And Splashing Clean Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Chlorination
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Clean Water Flowing
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Mohamed Bangura Teacher
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Bailing
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Participants Displaying And Explaining Disease Transmission Story Posters
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Participants Constructing Tippy Tap
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Hygiene Facilitator Teaching How To Take Care Of The Teeth
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Hygiene Facilitator Teaching How Disease Transfer Through Hand Shaking
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Hygiene Facilitator Teaching About Good Hygiene Practices
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Sarafina Student
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Headboy Daniel
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Principal Demonstrating Handwashing Method
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Using Training Materials
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Waiting To Use Latrine
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Playing Ground
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Girls Latrine Block
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Latrine For School Staff
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Mohamed Bangura Teacher
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Principal Melvina E Sumana
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Sarafina Fatmata Kamara
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Landscape
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Market Place
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Notice Board
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Sign Board
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Surrounding Area
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  School Surrounding Area
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Staff Room
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Stone Mining Around School Area
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Student Studing
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Students Playing
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Vice Principal Moris C Lewis
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School -  Boys Latrine Block

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jun 2020

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



St. Mary’s Junior Secondary School was established in 2003 based on a public cry for a secondary school within this locality to ease the burden of paying transport for kids to go afar for their education. The local Lewis family was instrumental in pleading and persuading the Reverend Father Albert Mengon, a Salesian Priest, to build this school. The school started at what is now St. Monica Primary School in Tardi and classes were later transferred to the current location. Over the years, the growth of the school has rapidly increased based on the students’ success on public exams.

Today, there are 386 students and 16 teachers and staff at this school.

The school is located some meters off the airport ferry highway in a village of Madina. The school grounds are flat. The buildings are painted in blue and white, depicting the school uniform. The school is made up of 2 long buildings consisting of 6 classrooms, a staff room, and offices for the Principal and Vice-Principal. Surrounded by mango trees, the school is well-ventilated and ideal for the teaching and learning process.

Across the street from the school is a church, and on the church grounds is the hand-dug well where students and local community members compete to get their water. We observed that the community-run well is not maintained properly.

Students have a difficult time accessing water from the well because community members prioritize their needs, forcing the students to wait in long lines while the adults collect water first. This means the students are missing a lot of valuable class time in their effort to collect water, and community members are frustrated having to compete with the pupils, often their own children. The scramble for water is causing disharmony within the community.

In addition, cases of waterborne illnesses such as dysentery, typhoid, skin rash, and diarrhea are common for students and community members due to drinking from the unsafe well water. For students, getting sick means more missed class time and lower academic performance. For their parents and the community members, water-related illnesses are costly in both effort and financial resources as they seek medical treatment.

“I have to fetch almost 4 containers of water before going to school. This is the reason why most of the time I am late for school,” said Sarafinan, a student at the school.

“The place is also very hard to travel to, especially when you have water on your head. I am forced at times to fetch water from the stream because there is such a long line at the hand pump.”

Sarafinan is not alone. Other community members will turn to the nearest stream to get water as well. But while it may be more convenient for some, it is even less safe than the community well. Waterborne diseases are rampant for those who drink this water.

“The last time my kid went to fetch water, she fell down and injured herself. I had to spend over 40,000 Leones ($4) for medication. All of this trouble to fetch contaminated water. Most of our sicknesses are related to drinking the bad water we need,” said Mohammed Bangura, a local farmer.

Their options are to either risk their personal health or go without water. The choice is hardly a fair one.

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling this at St. Mary’s Junior Secondary School. This project will relieve the people here of their water challenges. A borehole is best because presently the school shares an overcrowded water point with the community. Having the well restricted during the day will help students access to water whenever they need it without waiting in line and they will be able to focus without a lot of noise and distractions around the well.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to an open, contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Tholmossor Community will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for 3 days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dishracks and the importance of properly penning in animals to keep them away from human food and water. We will highlight the need to keep latrines clean, among many other topics.

These trainings will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Project Updates


06/26/2020: Lungi, Madina, St. Mary's Junior Secondary School Project Complete!

Please note, all photos in this report were taken before social distancing recommendations went into effect.

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable borehole well at St. Mary’s Junior Secondary School. The students and community members no longer have to rely on unsafe water to meet their daily needs. We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

New Well

The drilling of this new borehole was a success, and clean water is flowing!

“I have been working on getting such a project at my school, and God finally has answered my prayers. This is going to have a positive impact on my life because I no longer have to get any excuses from students leaving the school to get water to drink,” said Principal Melvina E. Sumana.

Principal Melvina E. Sumana

“This good deed is going to drastically change and improve our class time and also reduce the chances of students leaving the compound.”

The school is supported by the Catholic Mission. 2 Catholic priests along with community members and all of the members of the community’s teachers association were in attendance for the handing over ceremony after the completion of the project. The group present demonstrated handwashing using a tippy tap placed at the entrance of the well. The Catholic priests also talked about the importance of planting trees to help reverse the effects of climate change in the area.

“I am going to have more time in class without any excuse to go outside. With more class time that will eventually translate to better marks in school,” shared Daniel, a student at the school.

The Process

Here is how we dug a new well:

A pair of pits were dug next to the drill rig, 1 for the drill’s water supply, and another for what was pulled back up out of the borehole. Since the community already struggles with finding enough water, we ordered a private supplier to deliver the water we needed for drilling.

Day 1 of drilling started with filling the 2 pits with water mixed with bentonite. A 4-inch carbide-tipped bit was fixed to the 5-foot-long drill stem. The mud pump was started to supply water to the drill rig, and the drilling begins. During drilling, after every 5-foot length of drill stem put into the hole, the team would take material samples. The bags were labeled 1, 2, 3, and so on. These are to be reviewed later to determine the aquifer locations.

The second day of drilling was meant to expand the hole and clear it of mud. The team reached a total depth of 19 meters.

The team forcefully pumped clean water into the well to clear out any mud and debris from drilling. After, the filter pack was added so that the screened pipe would be protected. The temporary drilling casing was hoisted out so that we could fortify the pipes with cement.

The drilling had to be repeated 2 times before finding a successful site. The first borehole site did not produce any water. The second had water, though not the highest yield. We are going to continue monitoring this well and, if need be, intervene another time. The third site resulted in a successful project.

The Principal was devastated when the first attempt to drill the borehole was not successful, reported our teams. The look of disappointment was written all over her face. She was reassured that we would find another location for the well on the school grounds. Our team worked very hard to make sure that clean and safe water is available at the school and finally succeeded.

The third well was bailed by hand for 3 days before doing a yield test to verify the water quantity at a static water level of 14 meters.

Bailing the well

With these excellent results, a stainless steel India MkII pump was installed. Water quality tests show that this is clean water fit for drinking!

New Knowledge

Before conducting any hygiene training, we made repeated phone calls and visits to the local water user committee to understand better the challenges and lack of sanitation facilities in the community. We brought the findings from our baseline survey to the attention of the committee to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training or drilling could commence. When all the required guidelines were met, only then did our team of hygiene trainers go to conduct the training.

The community’s teachers’ association was also given a reminder to make sure parents and community leaders are all present during the training. Notice of the training was sent to the inspector of schools as well as the local Councilor. The head of the Catholic Church was also invited to participate in the training considering the fact that the school is a school under the leadership of the Catholic Mission.

To make sure every member of the community is aware of the training, phone calls, as well as several visits, were made to the community to make sure the information is passed out to everyone in the community.

More than 400 people attended the 3 days of training. The attendance was more than expected because all members of leadership and parents were present to get the critical news about hygiene and sanitation.

The crowd was too large for the training to be held in a classroom, so everyone moved outside. The training was held under some mango trees at the back and side of the school.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy taps; good and bad hygiene; disease transmission and prevention; worms and parasites; proper care of teeth; adequate care for the pump; keeping the water clean; the cost recovery system; dish racks and clotheslines; the importance of toilets; keeping the latrine clean; balanced diets; the diarrhea doll; and HIV and AIDS.

Disease transmission demonstration

“The training was precious to me. The organization is not only going to provide us with clean water but also have changed and strengthened our knowledge about hygiene and sanitation practices in our school and community,” said teacher Mohamed Bangura.

Tippy tap construction

“I currently have a tippy tap set up at my house to practice further what has been taught to us. As a teacher, I owe it to myself and students to make sure that whatever is taught to us is also shared.”

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : sierraleone20405-students-happy-splashing-water


04/30/2020: St. Mary's Junior Secondary School project underway

A severe clean water shortage at St. Mary’s Junior Secondary School in Sierra Leone drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone20405-student-carrying-water-3


Project Videos


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Hot Springs Community of Christ