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The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Smiles All Around
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Celebration
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Dignitaries At Well
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Everyone Smiling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Laughing
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Community Watches
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Driilling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling Begins
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling In Progress
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling Underway
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Chlorination
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  All Done
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Bad Hygiene Practices
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Balanced Diet
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Bathing Importance
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Constructing Tippy Tap
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Dental Hygiene
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Disease Transfer
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Disease Transmission
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Handwashing Demo
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Handwashing Demo
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Handwashing Lesson
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Healthy Vs Unhealthy Community
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Hygiene Practices
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Latrines
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Mosquito Net
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Pandemic Protection
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Participant Handwashing
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Tippy Tap Demo
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Training In Progress
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Worms And Parasites
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Santigie At The Well
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Abubakarr Celebrating
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Celebration
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  District Council Member
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drinking
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Drinking
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Happy Ladies
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Happy People
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Hooray
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Mamusu At Well
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Mamusu Drinking
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Mamusu With Kids
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Ministry Of Water Resources Rep
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Music
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Smiling
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  So Much Easier
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Family Members Removing Rice Seed From The Stem
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Garbage
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Abu Bakarr Kamara Village Headman
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Kamaras Son
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Kid Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Kid Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Laundrying
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Main Well
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Rice Seed Set For Processing
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Ricemeel Machine
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Sierra Leone Young Man Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Small Boy Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Village Surrounding
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Woman Boiling Rice Seeds
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Woman Drying Rice Seed Under Sunlight
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Young Man Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Young Man Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Young Man Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village -  Young Man Collecting Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Sep 2021

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 11/30/2021

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

The most common livelihood in Lumpa Wallah Village is farming; rice farming in the swamp, and dryland farming. A village with close to 800 people come together to work as one unit. Working to empower and develop all members of the community. They take turns working for one person, and the next day another person is helped to till and cultivate the land. Swamp farming takes a lot of time and hard work, making it nearly impossible for men to age without having intense back and hip pain.

One thing holding this community back is the lack of access to safe water. The current hand-dug that most people use for water is open contamination and located in the village’s upper part. The person fetching water stands with feet spread shoulder-width using a bucket tied to a rope. The environment is dirty, with mud clinging to the sides and bottom of the bucket.

“I am always late for school because I have to do a lot of work before going to school in the morning,” said the son of Abu Bakarr Kamara, the village Headman.

“I get up very early in the morning to stand in the long lines for water, and if I get up late, which happens often, I usually go to the swamp. I hate standing in line and wasting time.”

According to the community’s people, the quality of water over the years has greatly depreciated, causing a muddy and mildew smell to the water. The reported health issues are staggering. With long term use of contaminated water, the people are susceptible to waterborne illnesses such as diarrhea, dysentery, cholera, typhoid, worms, and other parasites.

The people on the far end of the village have to walk a long distance to fetch water that is unsafe for drinking and unreliable – the well runs dry often because it is not deep enough. Some people prefer going to the swamp to fetch water instead of walking and waiting for the long lines.

“Over the years, the population has more than doubled, and our need for clean water has also doubled,” explained Abu Bakarr Kamara.

He described how he spends most of his time settling disputes that arise at the well. This community is extensive and requires clean and safe water. With a borehole in the community, it will greatly help to alleviate the seasonal well. The effects of global warming are fast deteriorating our way supply this, making hand-dug wells obsolete. A borehole is going to provide water to the community all year round.

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling this well at Lumpa Wallah village. This project will relieve the people here of their water challenges.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to open contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Lumpa Wallah village will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep latrines clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Project Updates


09/28/2021: Lokomsama, Lumpa Wallah Village Well Project Complete!

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable borehole well at Lumpa Wallah Village. As a result, the students and community members no longer have to rely on unsafe water to meet their daily needs. We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

Abubakarr Kamara, the village headman, expressed his thanks for the new well, and said it will solve many of the community's problems. The reliable source of water will help the community members with fish and palm oil processing, construction, farming, and it will also aid the Muslims in the community in performing the ablutions associated with their daily prayers.

Abubakarr is the man wearing the hat in the foreground.

"But having this newly constructed borehole with hand pump has solved our constraints in terms of shortage of water," Abubakarr said.

"We now have safe water to drink, cook, bathe, and do other household activities," said Mamusu Conteh, an 18-year-old food vendor. "We will no longer have skin rashes and other diseases that affect us through drinking contaminated water. We thank God for giving us this good opportunity."

Mamusu at the well.

The new well will affect Mamusu's daily life. "I used to find it very difficult to get water in the morning to prepare the food [that I sell]." Because it took Mamusu so long to fetch the water, cook the food, and find a spot in which to sell, she often missed out on customers.

"By the time I could reach them, they could have already eaten, and they [would not] buy my food," Mamusu explained. "At times, I returned home with a large portion of food. But with the safe water source, [I will be able] to prepare my food on time to sell and make money to solve my school affairs."

New Well

The drilling of this new borehole was a success, and clean water is flowing!

When the well was done, we held a dedication ceremony to officially hand over the well to the people of Lumpa Wallah, who prepared refreshments for the visitors - members of Ward 244 Council, the Port Loko District Council, and the Ministry of Water Resources. Lumpa Wallah really knows how to celebrate! They even involved some of the visiting dignitaries in their singing and dancing. The festivities were a sight to behold.

The Process

The drill team arrived the day before beginning work. They set up camp and unpacked all their tools and supplies to prepare for drilling the next day. The community provided space for the team to store their belongings, along with meals for the duration of their stay. The following day, the work began.

Our team dug two pits next to the drill rig, one for the drill’s water supply and another for what the drill pulls out of the borehole. In some cases, we order a private supplier to deliver the water for drilling since water access is already a challenge.

Day one of drilling began with the team filling the two pits with water mixed with bentonite, an absorbing, swelling clay. Next, the team fixed a four-inch carbide-tipped bit to the five-foot-long drill stem. They started the mud pump to supply water to the drill rig so that drilling could begin!

The team took material samples after putting each five-foot length of drill stem into the hole. We labeled the bags so we could review them later to determine the aquifer locations.

On the second day of drilling, the team expanded the hole and cleared it of mud. After reaching a total depth of 23 meters, the team forcefully pumped clean water into the well to clear any mud and debris from the drilling process. We then protected the screened pipe by adding a filter pack. The team hoisted the temporary drilling casing to fortify the pipes with cement.

Next, we bailed the well by hand for three days before conducting a yield test to verify the water quantity.

Yield test preparation.

The yield of this well was 20 liters per minute, with a static water level of 6 meters. With these excellent results, we installed a stainless steel India MkII pump. Water quality test results showed that this is clean water fit for drinking!

New Knowledge

Before conducting any hygiene training, we made repeated phone calls and visits to the local water user committee to understand better the community’s challenges and lack of sanitation facilities. We shared the findings from our discussions with the committee members to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training began. For example, we identified households without handwashing stations or ones that may need to repair their latrines. With this information, community members worked together to improve hygiene and sanitation at home.

After this preparatory period, we scheduled a time when members from each household using the water point could attend a multi-day hygiene and sanitation training. We then dispatched our teams to the agreed-upon location to hold the meeting.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy taps, good and bad hygiene habits, disease transmission and prevention, worms and parasites, dental hygiene, proper care of the well's pump, keeping the water clean, the cost recovery system, dish racks and clotheslines, the importance of toilets, keeping latrines clean, balanced diets, the diarrhea doll, and HIV and AIDS.

For the members of the Lumpa Wallah community, the most memorable topic was dental hygiene. Some of the younger community members teased the elders whose teeth show signs of tobacco use. They vowed to remember how to clean their teeth properly so as to preserve their looks (whatever reason works to get them brushing, we guess!).

The second highlight of the training was the construction of a tippy tap handwashing station. The village headman was particularly excited by the prospect of being able to erect handwashing stations all over the community rather than saving up the community's funds to buy expensive veronica buckets. Some of the participants were so eager to construct their own tippy taps that they rushed to the table before the training facilitators had finished talking!

Fatmata Kamara, a local trader, expressed her thanks for having received the training. "With this training, I [have] now receive[d] good knowledge of proper hygiene. I now have a better understanding of handwashing and the importance of latrines. We are grateful for the hygiene knowledge you have [brought] to our community. You have help[ed] us in saving our lives is from disease."

Bangalie Kargbo, a 22-year-old farmer, explained to us why he thought the training was impactful. "This has helped to save my life from the virus (COVID-19) with the help of the preventive measures you have explain[ed] to me. Now that we have received this training, we are going to take all the hygiene and sanitation steps that you have taught us to do, especially handwashing."

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : mhsl21523-0-laughing


07/14/2021: Lumpa Wallah Village project underway

A severe clean water shortage in Lumpa Wallah Village drains people’s time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone20416-kid-collecting-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - StossWater