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The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Young Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Young Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Young Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Young Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Woman Selling Palm Wine
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Woman Selling Food
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Latrine
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Latrine
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Landscape
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Landscape
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Inside Kitchen
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Household
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Household
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Household
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Gardening
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Gardening
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Garden
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Filling Up Container At Open Well
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Community Area
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Community Area
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Collecting Water At Open Well
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Waysaya Community, #1 Reverend Samuel Street -  Alternate Water Source

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 109 Served

Project Phase:  Under Construction
Estimated Install Date (?):  08/31/2021

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Wasaya is a newly formed community in Lungi, Sierra Leone. What used to be a forest has now been turned into an up-and-coming community with great development hopes. All large trees have been cut down to make room for the newly built homes by people looking to escape the more developed communities’ hustle and bustle. It is a well-known place for people to come to harvest palm fruit. All the large and thick bushes have been cut to reveal a stunning landscape.

Since the community is newly formed, it lacks the necessary access to adequate and safe water. The 109 people currently living here rely on water from the swamp for drinking as well as domestic uses. The water is unsafe for consumption. According to interviewees, the reported health consequences of using water from this source range from cholera, diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, and several stomach illnesses.

“The availability of safe and clean water is a determinant of the growth of any community. The quickest way for a community to develop is to have access to water facilities, schools within the community, and access to medical care,” said 70-year-old Bunting Samuels.

There is an open well, but it is not accessible for most community members since it is on private property. Additionally, since it is open, the well is just as prone to contamination as the swamp. So, most people use the swamp anyway because it is open for anyone to fetch water, and not restricted like the private well.

Family members spend a large portion of each day fetching water at the swamp to accommodate their families’ water needs. The swamp water is contaminated due to the repeated use of fertilizers on the fruits and vegetable gardens surrounding it. One of the convenient things about the swamp, however, is that the water is always available year-round, even if it is limited during the dry season. When the water reduces, people dig scoop holes into the swamp’s mud to access the water. It takes between 10 to 15 minutes round-trip to access any of the scoop holes. It isn’t easy to access clean water anywhere in the community.

The children and women make their way to the swamp each morning and afternoon to supply their families with the only available source of water. The best time to fetch water from the swamp is very early in the morning, community members say, before it is greatly disturbed by many people walking in it to fetch it. The quality of water fetched very early in the morning, according to them, is of better quality than the water fetched during the afternoon and evening hours. Morning water, therefore, is used strictly for drinking and cooking, while afternoon water is reserved for doing the laundry, bathing, and other domestic chores.

The proposed project will be the first of its kind in the Wasaya community, and it will help to serve an additional number of homes as development increases. Having access to safe water improves both a community’s overall health and the rate at which they are able to develop.

“We suffer to get clean water to drink,” said teenager Yeanoah K.

“Since it is my responsibility to make sure there is always clean water available, I am at a loss for words to describe the way that I felt when I heard the great news of getting a borehole in our community. The proposed location is less than a minute walk from my house.”

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling is centrally located and will relieve many people of the long journey to fetch water. This project will relieve the people here of their water challenges.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to open contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Wayasa Community will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep restrooms clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Project Updates


06/23/2021: Waysaya Community Well Project Underway!

A severe clean water shortage in Waysaya Community drains people’s time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone21529-young-woman-carrying-water-4


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Rogers Neeley Family Fund
Chaparral Elementary School
The Commonwealth Club of the Riviera
North Dunedin Baptist Church
United Way of the Capital Region
Lebrusan Studio
Bounce Treatment Services
Sandcastle Giving Fund
Totoket Valley Elementary School Northford, CT
Thriven Choice Dollars
Southside School
United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey
Mrs. Grossnickles 3rd Grade Class
84 individual donor(s)