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The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Student Carrying Water
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Community Well
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Waiting To Use Latrine
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Outside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Outside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Sign
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Landscape
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Gate
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Latrine
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Isatu K
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Garbage
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Computer Lab
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Amidu Conteh Principal
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  Students Inside Classroom
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Notice Board
The Water Project: Munamakarr Secondary School -  School Landscape

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  03/31/2022

Project Features


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Munamakarr Secondary School was established by Ousman Koroma, who saw the need to address the overcrowded classrooms at some of the schools in the area. He noticed that much emphasis was not being placed on examination integrity and vowed that his school would become one of the best. The school is named after a Temne word meaning “You have been waited for.”

The secondary school began with an enrollment of 140 students, and in a few years, the population has more than tripled to the 600 students who attend today. The school’s construction was completed in 2011 with only junior secondary school students attending. In a short few years, the school was making headlines by producing the best external exam results.

Over the years since its founding, the school has increased both the number of students enrolled and the number of classrooms on campus. If the trend continues, there is a plan for further improvements to continue to put the school on the path of excellence. However, a lack of water points on the school grounds is holding it back.

“Some parents have refused to send their students to this school because there is no water source. I cannot blame them; I would also want the best of everything for my children. As a parent and Principal, I have to make sure I provide all facilities to qualify the school. A school without water is just a building and not fit to carry the name of a school,” said Principal Amidu Conteh.

The water challenges send the students across the street to another secondary school that is fortunate enough to have a hand-dug well with a hand pump. But the Munamakarr Secondary School students have to make sure they fetch their water before the other school’s administration decides to lock the gate. The Munamakarr Secondary School has tried before to have get a borehole well put into their school using local resources, but the plan never amounted to anything tangible.

“It is shameful for us students to go to another school to fetch water for use at the school compound, be it for drinking or other use, but it should not be like that. I have been praying silently for a solution to this problem because if it is not resolved, I will never return to this school,” said student Isatu K.

“I have spent some of my primary school education fetching water, and now that I am in secondary school, I still have to endure such treatments. No, it will not happen again.”

The school administration saw the need for a sustainable source of water that will serve the students and, if needed, the school across the road if and when their water well is nonfunctional.

“I have seen all the excuses in the world when students are trying to leave for the day. I am in no position to dispute what they claim. My goal and dream are to make sure water is going to be available for the students and staff all year round,” said Principal Conteh.

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling is centrally located and will relieve many people of the long journey to fetch water. This project will reduce the people here of their water challenges.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to open contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Munamakarr Secondary School will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep restrooms clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


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