Loading images...
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Animal House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Animal House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Momoh Kamara
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Abu S
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Abu S
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Landscape
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Latrine And Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Latrine And Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Mosque
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Rice Seeds Set Up To Dry
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Rice Seeds Set Up To Dry
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Woman Processing Rice
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Young Man Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Abu Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Yeamp Mamotta (Next to Dauda Kamara's House) -  Young Man Collecting Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  05/21/2022

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



The 114 community members of Yeamp Mamotta are up very early in the morning with the hope of getting the best water possible from the swamp. The water is less murky and dirty early in the morning.

As the water gets stirred up from others fetching, the water becomes milky and opaque with silt and dirt. However, fetching early doesn’t protect the community members from scooping up worms, tadpoles, fish, decaying swamp debris, or carcinogenic fertilizer from nearby farms. And no matter what time the people get water, it always smells like fish and mud.

Day after day, the children of Yeamp Mamotta drink the contaminated water, which contributes to this community’s high child mortality rate. More children die from waterborne illnesses in this small community than in bigger towns that have better access to clean water and hospitals.

Momoh Kamara, the village headman, explained to us what it’s been like living in Yeamp Mamotta. “I have relocated most of my children to the city with relatives. I have lived through the hardship of not having water in the village. I have also seen my older children drop out of school.”

Abu, a 17-year-old boy, told us that his least favorite part about the village’s water situation is having to fetch it. “There are so many dangers on the road to the swamp, every day at someone will definitely fall victim to one,” he said. “I have to wait until the sun is up, so I can see where I am going. Several times I had stepped on a group of ants that bit my entire body before I realized it. Those ants sting so bad that my whole day will be ruined.”

“Some of the trees that hang over the footpath are also the nests to some of the most powerful bees,” Abu said. “Within seconds, they will change the face of anyone. I will never wish it on any other person, young or old.”

But with the hope of a new, safe water point, Momoh has hope for his community for the first time in a while. “We will be the luckiest and most grateful group of people that your organization have ever helped with a safe source of water,” he said. “We did not know what to do, except pray for the people that are going to bless us with this goodness. No matter how bad things get, we always make room for worshipping the Almighty Allah. God is beginning to answer our prayers.”

What we can do:

New Well

Where we will be drilling is centrally located and will relieve many people of the long journey to fetch water and the challenge of accessing clean water.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

By drilling this borehole, TKKK and the surrounding community will be provided with plenty of accessible, clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep restrooms clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors